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  • world's
  • In this age of computer-guided rockets and Buck Rogers wonders of destruction, something terribly primitive remains fixed in the rivalry of the world's two nuclear superpowers. (washingtonpost.com)
  • The findings on the genetic blueprint of the dampwood termite, one of the world's most primitive social insects, highlight key differences and similarities with other social insects like ants, wasps and bees, and provide insight into how social insects evolved. (eurekalert.org)
  • racial
  • This book examines closely the racial differences in intelligence among the "primitive" peoples of Australia, Africa (Botswana, the Kalahari), and various Asian and Pacific islander peoples (Malay Peninsula, Japan, Borneo, and Philippine Islands). (google.com)
  • In my studies of these several racial stocks I find that it is not accident but accumulated wisdom regarding food that lies behind their physical excellence and freedom from our modern degenerative processes , and, further, that on various sides of our world the primitive people know many of the things that are essential for life-things that our modern civilizations apparently do not know . (mercola.com)
  • If this is not the explanation, it must be that these various primitive racial stocks have been able through a superior skill in interpreting cause and effect, to determine for themselves what foods in their environment are best for producing human bodies with a maximum of physical fitness and resistance to degeneration. (mercola.com)
  • origins
  • The term "primitive" (sometimes "primeval" or "primal") is close to "archaic," but should be distinguished from the latter in that "primitive" refers not to origins but rather to an anthropological or historical description of cultural phenomena (myths, religions, legends) or modes of thinking that remain unconscious in modern, civilized humans. (encyclopedia.com)
  • People
  • In Freud's hypothesis, as outlined in "On the Universal Tendency to Debasement in the Sphere of Love" (1912d), "primitive" people, although they too live in a civilization remote from archaic times, are the equivalent of the childhood of "civilized" people. (encyclopedia.com)
  • closely
  • In the two-part study, an extensive evaluation of skeletal structures provides evidence that plesiadapiforms, a group of archaic mammals once thought to be more closely related to flying lemurs, are the most primitive primates. (innovations-report.com)
  • form
  • One needs a more primitive form of self-consciousness in order to account for one's capacity to refer to oneself with the first-person pronoun in utterances expressing first-person beliefs. (uniroma3.it)
  • work
  • The formation of the primitive streak relies on a complex network of signaling pathways that work together to ensure that this process is highly regulated. (wikipedia.org)
  • Among salient examples of Freud's use of the term in his work are references to primitive religions and primitive sexual rites of worship (letter to Wilhelm Fliess dated January 24, 1897) and to primitive languages in which, as in dreams, there is no such thing as negation or contradiction (1900a), or in which a word is even systematically used with opposite meanings to express ambivalence (1910e). (encyclopedia.com)
  • Primitive savages never did any real work cheerfully or willingly. (urantiabook.org)
  • 69:2.4 Primitive man disliked hard work, and he would not hurry unless confronted by grave danger. (urantiabook.org)
  • results
  • In the chick, the absence of the hypoblast results in multiple streaks, suggesting that its presence is important for regulating the formation of a single primitive streak. (wikipedia.org)
  • Removal of the hypoblast in the chick results in correctly patterned ectopic streaks, suggesting that the hypoblast serves to inhibit formation of the primitive streak. (wikipedia.org)
  • itself
  • While the specific position of the fragment, gl_FragCoord will change, per the fragment's location, it would be more useful to know where one is relative to the point primitive itself. (khronos.org)
  • early
  • Freud's interest in the primitive was manifested as early as "A Project for a Scientific Psychology" (1950c ), where he cited Charles Darwin . (encyclopedia.com)
  • 69:2.2 Before the dawn of early frugality and primitive industry the lot of the average tribe was one of destitution and real suffering. (urantiabook.org)
  • comes
  • Given that the chicken embryo can be easily manipulated, most of our knowledge about the primitive streak comes from avian studies. (wikipedia.org)
  • source
  • The epiblast , a single epithelial layer blastodisc , is the source of all embryonic material in amniotes and some of its cells will give rise to the primitive streak. (wikipedia.org)
  • social
  • These sensory receptors may not be as important to being social as we previously believed, at least for these more primitive termites," Roe said. (eurekalert.org)
  • structure
  • Xing Xu and colleagues at the Chinese Academy of Sciences report the discovery of 120 million-year-old primitive fossil feathers , whose structure matches a prediction about the evolution of feathers made 10 years ago. (science20.com)
  • questions
  • Maybe the arrival point is just the opposite, and "Primitive Plus" leaves you free-falling without a landing or in an ocean of questions you have no answers for. (impact89fm.org)
  • modern
  • It can be tempting for us to simplify this observation into the easily digestible message that tooth decay and other degenerative diseases are simply a result of the transition to modern life and diet, but if we do this, we wind up missing the overwhelming emphasis that Price placed on what he called primitive wisdom. (mercola.com)