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  • potatoes
  • The potato was originally believed to have been domesticated independently in multiple locations, but later genetic testing of the wide variety of cultivars and wild species traced a single origin for potatoes. (wikipedia.org)
  • The name spud for a small potato comes from the digging of soil (or a hole) prior to the planting of potatoes. (wikipedia.org)
  • chimeras made by grafting a tomato plant onto a potato plant, which can produce both edible tomatoes and potatoes. (mcgill.ca)
  • Nutritionally, potatoes are best known for their carbohydrate content (approximately 26 grams in a medium potato. (mcgill.ca)
  • From: mworkman@vm.cc.purdue.edu (Maggie Workman) GNOCCHIs (Potato(e) Cavatelli) ============================== Ingredients: ------------ 6 cups flour 3 boiled potato(e)s 2 tblsp olive oil or shortening 1 egg (optional) Instructions: ------------- Peel and mash the potatoes and pass through a sieve. (cmu.edu)
  • This means that using the same line of potato for production of seed potatoes for several consecutive generations will lead to a progressive increase in viral load and subsequent loss of crop. (wikipedia.org)
  • The potato blight was released upon the land, killing millions of potatoes in one fell swoop, and starving the human population of its main food supply. (everything2.com)
  • I'd like to see more sales by variety," agreed Mel Henninger, a potato specialist with the Rutgers School of Environmental and Biological Sciences in New Brunswick, who expects to evaluate 350 types of potatoes this year. (nj.com)
  • Potato dishes vary with the season, and much depends on whether the potatoes are waxy and new, or the last season's crop and hence drier and more floury," wrote Anne Willan, founder and director of La Varenne cooking school, in "The Country Cooking of France" (Chronicle Books, 2007). (nj.com)
  • Potato croquettes, potato pancakes, and mashed potatoes also appear regularly on his menus. (nj.com)
  • tubers
  • Normal potato tubers that have been grown and stored properly produce glycoalkaloids in amounts small enough to be negligible to human health, but if green sections of the plant (namely sprouts and skins) are exposed to light, the tuber can accumulate a high enough concentration of glycoalkaloids to affect human health. (wikipedia.org)
  • Any potato variety can also be propagated vegetatively by planting pieces of existing tubers, cut to include at least one eye. (mcgill.ca)
  • Infected seeed tubers, infected soil, machinery and implements used in infested potato fields and potato cultivation, footwear, and manure from animals that have fed on infested tubers can spread this disease. (usda.gov)
  • Try growing and comparing potato plants both from tubers and true seeds. (garden.org)
  • Fortunately, there are people working to maintain seeds and tubers for a diversity of potato varieties. (garden.org)
  • methane
  • The International Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) and treaties such as the Kyoto Protocol assume methane to be, tonne-for-tonne, 25 times more potent than carbon dioxide at warming the planet. (scientificamerican.com)
  • North America
  • This may be one of the reasons why Europeans are, according to the UN's Food and Agriculture Organization (FAO), "the heartiest potato eaters," consuming just over 96 kilograms per capita in 2005, compared to almost 58 kilograms in North America, almost 26 kilograms in Asia/Oceania, almost 24 kilograms in Latin America, and about 14 kilograms in Africa. (nj.com)
  • crop
  • Emphasizing the potential of the world's fourth most important food crop (after corn, wheat and rice) to nourish populations in under-developed regions of the world, the General Assembly of the United Nations has proclaimed 2008 as -- drum roll, please -- the International Year of the Potato. (nj.com)
  • variety
  • Marcy is a late maturing white potato variety. (wikipedia.org)
  • PVY infection of potato plants results in a variety of symptoms depending on the viral strain. (wikipedia.org)
  • We contend that LIMD2 is a marker that could help physicians profile tumors, and a potential drug target that could yield a potent therapy for a variety of advanced cancers, perhaps in combination with existing or emerging therapies," Rauscher said. (redorbit.com)
  • Stateside, where famine is an unlikely threat, potato promoters are hoping that consumers who grew up with the snack food slogan "You can't eat just one" to realize that they don't have to buy just one -- fresh potato variety, that is. (nj.com)
  • Often known as the Idaho potato because it is widely grown in that state, the earthy looking Russet remains the nation's most popular variety. (nj.com)
  • It's a challenge for distributors and retailers to sort every different type of potato by variety, he added. (nj.com)
  • But growing plants from seed is the only way to get a new potato variety. (garden.org)
  • vegetable
  • The potato is a cool-season vegetable -- however, it freezes when the temperature drops below 0 degrees Celcius and must be covered whenever there is the threat of frost . (everything2.com)
  • Mashed, baked, fried or zapped -- not to mention chipped and dipped -- the potato is America's favorite vegetable. (nj.com)
  • poisonous
  • Of course, since the fruits are poisonous (containing atropine ), it took a while for the potato to become established in the Swedish household. (everything2.com)
  • salad
  • Carlin finds the jumbo size of the Idaho Burbank Russet ideal for making his popular Idaho fries and spicy barbecue chips, while the vivid hue of Purple Peruvians enhances the eye-appeal of the potato salad he serves with lobster omelets and grilled striped bass. (nj.com)
  • A very tasty change from traditional potato salad. (bhg.com)
  • nutrients
  • 50%) of the nutrients are found within the potato itself The cooking method used can significantly impact the nutrient availability of the potato. (mcgill.ca)
  • Most of the starch will have been removed from the potato piece to provide nutrients for the young plant. (garden.org)
  • necrosis
  • Marcy has few external defects but is susceptible to internal heat necrosis and hollow heart (hollowed center of potato). (wikipedia.org)
  • known
  • PVYC, originally known as Potato Virus C, was the first to be recognized and was identified in the 1930s. (wikipedia.org)
  • A team of Vanderbilt University researchers has worked out the molecular details that explain how one of the most potent bacterial toxins known--yatakemycin--kills cells by preventing their DNA from replicating. (nsf.gov)
  • widely
  • However, the potato was not widely consumed in Europe, remaining instead a curiosity rather than a food source. (everything2.com)
  • plants
  • Flowers are mostly cross-pollinated by other potato plants, including by insects, but a substantial amount of self-fertilizing occurs. (mcgill.ca)
  • PVY may be transmitted to potato plants through grafting, plant sap inoculation and through aphid transmission. (wikipedia.org)
  • The most common manner of PVY infection of plant material in the field is through the aphid and although aphids on their own can directly damage potato plants it is their role as viral vectors which has the greatest economic impact. (wikipedia.org)
  • Conduct an investigation to discover the smallest piece of potato that, when planted will produce a new potato plant (It's rumored that poor farmers have started new plants from mere potato peelings containing eyes! (garden.org)
  • content
  • Moreover, the fiber content of a potato with skin (2 grams) equals that of many whole grain breads, pastas, and cereals. (mcgill.ca)
  • tomatoes
  • Being a nightshade similar to tomatoes , the vegetative and fruiting parts of the potato contain the toxin solanine and are not fit for human consumption. (wikipedia.org)
  • medium
  • A medium potato (5.3 oz) with the skin provides 27 mg vitamin C (45% of the Daily Value (DV)), 620 mg of potassium (18% of DV), 0.2 mg vitamin B6 (10% of DV) and trace amounts of thiamin, riboflavin, folate, niacin, magnesium, phosphorous, iron, and zinc. (mcgill.ca)
  • group
  • The origin of the word "spud" has erroneously been attributed to an 18th-century activist group dedicated to keeping the potato out of Britain, calling itself The Society for the Prevention of Unwholesome Diet (S.P.U.D.) . It was Mario Pei 's 1949 The Story of Language that can be blamed for the word's false origin . (wikipedia.org)
  • source
  • The importance in effective and stringent monitoring of aphid populations is stressed in a review by Radcliffe and Ragsdale (2002) as PVY virions are introduced to potato fields almost solely by winged aphids from a virus source outside these fields. (wikipedia.org)
  • made
  • When he was growing up in South Orange, he recalled, "My mom always made me a baked potato when I was home sick. (nj.com)
  • world
  • When the potato was introduced to Europe from the New World, royal cooks routinely trashed it as fodder for the lowly. (nj.com)