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  • higher porosity
  • for two similar sandy aquifers, the one with a higher porosity will typically have a higher hydraulic conductivity (more open area for the flow of water), but there are many complications to this relationship. (wikipedia.org)
  • Well sorted (grains of approximately all one size) materials have higher porosity than similarly sized poorly sorted materials (where smaller particles fill the gaps between larger particles). (wikipedia.org)
  • higher porosity decreases the sediment strength (thus increases the shear stress τB). (wikipedia.org)
  • Sedimentary
  • The porosity of a rock, or sedimentary layer, is an important consideration when attempting to evaluate the potential volume of water or hydrocarbons it may contain. (wikipedia.org)
  • Sedimentary porosity is a complicated function of many factors, including but not limited to: rate of burial, depth of burial, the nature of the connate fluids, the nature of overlying sediments (which may impede fluid expulsion). (wikipedia.org)
  • gases
  • Porosity in welding is a result of dissolved gases or gases released during the welding process, being trapped in the metal when there is insufficient time to escape prior to solidification. (ndt.net)
  • fraction
  • Porosity is a fraction between 0 and 1, typically ranging from less than 0.01 for solid granite to more than 0.5 for peat and clay. (wikipedia.org)
  • quantify
  • More recently some practitioners have returned to efforts to "quantify" aspects of porosity based on both amplitude and duration of signals. (ndt.net)
  • typically
  • For example: clays typically have very low hydraulic conductivity (due to their small pore throat radii) but also have very high porosities (due to the structured nature of clay minerals), which means clays can hold a large volume of water per volume of bulk material, but they do not release water rapidly and therefore have low hydraulic conductivity. (wikipedia.org)
  • Typically a B-scan display is used to detect and characterise porosity. (ndt.net)
  • Relevant storage capacity is considered to have evolved with thermal decomposition of organic matter during catagenesis, where we estimate that kerogen porosity does not typically exceed 3% of bulk rock volume. (mendeley.com)
  • defect
  • Recent fitness-for-purpose acceptance criteria such as API 1104 (2) and others permit treatment of porosity as a planar defect. (ndt.net)
  • bound water
  • This mode of porosity likely evolved with the thermal transformation of labile kerogen and probably neither depends nor interacts (except perhaps chemically) with previously assumed ‐œmatrix‐ or ‐œmineral‐ porosity that is dominated by bound water, and that may be largely irrelevant to hydrocarbon storage capacity in these rocks. (mendeley.com)
  • volume
  • If a core sample is dried in a normal dry oven (non-humidified atmosphere) the clay layers and quartz together form the grain volume, with all other components constituting core analysis "total porosity" (notwithstanding comments in (6) below). (wikipedia.org)
  • thermal
  • To address this newly recognized and important nonmatrix kerogen pore system, that is arguably the dominant hydrocarbon storage and mobility network in these rocks, we introduce a relatively simple kinetic model that describes porosity development within kerogen as a function of thermal maturation.Kerogen porosity development is estimated within the upper Albian Mowry Shale in the Powder River Basin of Wyoming to illustrate the approach. (mendeley.com)
  • Examples
  • Examples of materials that porosity is of importance include catalysts, construction materials, ceramics, pharmaceutical products, metal powders, membranes, active components in batteries and fuel cells, and oil and gas bearing reservoirs. (micromeritics.com)
  • characteristics
  • In spite of its relatively poor reflecting characteristics, porosity detection is not as challenging a task for ultrasonic testing as one might think. (ndt.net)
  • rock
  • The volumetric portion of bulk rock that is not occupied by grains, crystals, or natural cementing material is termed porosity. (britannica.com)
  • Evaluations of porosity relevant to hydrocarbon storage capacity in kerogen-rich mudrocks (i.e., source rocks) have thus far been plagued with ambiguity, in large part because conventional core and petrophysical techniques were not designed for this rock type. (mendeley.com)
  • material
  • A dual porosity PTFE tube including an inner surface of expanded PTFE material having a first porosity and an outer surface of expanded PTFE material having a porosity different from that of the inner surface. (google.es)
  • Porosity in finer material below the aggregating influence of pedogenesis can be expected to approximate this value. (wikipedia.org)
  • weld
  • The effect of porosity on the weld strength is a much-debated topic, but generally it is acknowledged to be over rated and its significance poorly reflected by the stringent workmanship requirements imposed on it. (ndt.net)