• Use the given confidence level and sample data to find a confidence interval for the population standard sigma. (jiskha.com)
  • Population studies is broadly defined as the scientific study of human populations. (encyclopedia.com)
  • The Population Association of America, established in 1930, is a scientific, professional organization established to promote the improvement, advancement, and progress through research of problems related to human populations. (encyclopedia.com)
  • This course surveys population genetics theory as applied to the study of micro-evolutionary changes, with particular applications for human populations. (washington.edu)
  • Much of the course is about formal (i.e. mathematical) models for changes in allele frequencies over time, which will then be used to understand human evolution on ecological and evolutionary time scales, examine the ways in which genetic variability has been used to study affinities among different groups, and reconstruct the past dynamics of human populations. (washington.edu)
  • 1) Atmospheric carbon, (CO2)atm, and human populations equilibrate at positive values. (repec.org)
  • If current trends continue, the population of the United States will rise to 438 million in 2050, from 296 million in 2005, and 82% of the increase will be due to immigrants arriving from 2005 to 2050 and their U.S.-born descendants, according to new projections developed by the Pew Research Center. (pewsocialtrends.org)
  • The Latino population, already the nation's largest minority group, will triple in size and will account for most of the nation's population growth from 2005 through 2050. (pewsocialtrends.org)
  • Hispanics will make up 29% of the U.S. population in 2050, compared with 14% in 2005. (pewsocialtrends.org)
  • The nation's elderly population will more than double in size from 2005 through 2050, as the baby boom generation enters the traditional retirement years. (pewsocialtrends.org)
  • It is projected that the combined senior and geriatric population will reach 2.1 billion by 2050. (wikipedia.org)
  • Among the countries currently classified by the United Nations as more developed (with a total population of 1.2 billion in 2005), the overall median age rose from 28 in 1950 to 40 in 2010, and is forecast to rise to 44 by 2050. (wikipedia.org)
  • Thereafter, India s population is projected to continue growing for several decades to 1.5 billion in 2030 and 1.7 billion in 2050, while the population of China was expected to remain fairly constant until the 2030s, after which it was expected to slightly decrease. (globalsecurity.org)
  • Their choices will determine how many people will be on the planet by 2050 and beyond," read the Population Fund display. (washingtonpost.com)
  • Even with fertility rates falling, the United Nations projects that by 2050, the world's population will be between 7.3 billion and 10.7 billion, with 8.9 billion the most likely figure. (washingtonpost.com)
  • In new forecasts released on Wednesday evening, UN demographers cut 400 million from their best estimate of the world's population in 2050. (newscientist.com)
  • Joseph Chamie, the head of the UN population division in New York, said he now expected 8.9 billion people on Earth in 2050, rather than the 9.3 billion that he forecast in 2002. (newscientist.com)
  • The new population projections stretch to the year 2050, but not beyond. (newscientist.com)
  • The detailed projections for individual countries show 33 countries with smaller populations in 2050 than today. (newscientist.com)
  • The US population is predicted to rise from 285 million now to 409 million in 2050. (newscientist.com)
  • However since the world population will pass 7 billion in 2011 and may hit 9 billion by 2050, it's message is still important and relevant to our time. (google.com)
  • The share of the population aged 60 and over is projected to increase in nearly every country in the world during 2005-2050. (nber.org)
  • Between 2007 and 2050, the UN projects that global populationwill increase by 2.5 billion (from 6.7 to 9.2 billion), while the global urban populationwill nearly double (from3.3 billion to 6.4 billion), absorbing all increased population growth aswell as inflows fromrural areas. (worldwatch.org)
  • While developing countries will continue to be predominantly rural for some years to come, they are already home to over 70 percent of the global urban population, a proportion that will increase in the coming decades to over 80 percent by 2050. (worldwatch.org)
  • In contrast, the urban population of the highly urbanized developed countries represents less than 30 percent of global total, and its share will drop to less than 20 percent by 2050. (worldwatch.org)
  • Current United Nations estimates of population stabilization at about 9 billion people by 2050 are questionable, mainly because of the very young age structure of the current world population and the momentum it fosters. (worldwatch.org)
  • For example, by the year 2050, China's older population-those over age 65-will likely swell to 330 million, or nearly three times as many as now. (mercer.com)
  • China's older population-those over age 65-will likely swell to 330 million by 2050. (mercer.com)
  • As the world population doubled from three to six billion, researchers in population studies have been examining shifts in population dynamics. (encyclopedia.com)
  • How do population dynamics affect greenhouse gases and climate change? (slideshare.net)
  • The ways in which population densities fluctuate - increasing, decreasing, or both over time - is the subject of population dynamics. (encyclopedia.com)
  • The first and most basic model of population dynamics assumes that an environment has unlimited resources and can support an unlimited number of individuals. (encyclopedia.com)
  • In the complex world of population dynamics, factors which can influence the population growth rate are said to be endogenous (affecting the population density and dependant on it) or exogenous (affecting the population density, but independent of it), resulting in population dynamics models typically described as stochastic , deterministic or a combination of both (Turchin, 2003). (optusnet.com.au)
  • To do that we have to go back to the first principle of population dynamics (Turchin, 2003) - the approximate exponential law first introduced by Malthus in 1798. (optusnet.com.au)
  • The Centre on Population Dynamics (CPD) is a community of scholars dedicated to creating and disseminating new knowledge on the transformative demographic and health changes occurring across the globe. (mcgill.ca)
  • The Population Dynamics Option (PDO) is a cross-disciplinary, cross-faculty graduate program offered as an option within 5 existing Master's and doctoral programs in the departments of Sociology, Economics, and Epidemiology, Biostatistics, and Occupational Health (EBOH) at McGill University. (mcgill.ca)
  • The Centre on Population Dynamics brings together leading population researchers from disciplines across social science and health fields, including demography, economics, epidemiology, and. (mcgill.ca)
  • The Global Ageing Survey, exploring attitudes, expectations and behaviours towards later life and retirement, directed by George Leeson, and covering 44,000 people aged 40-80 in 24 countries from across the globe has revealed that many people are now fully aware of the ageing of the world's population and the implications which this will have on their lives and the lives of their children and grandchildren. (wikipedia.org)
  • The Population Fund's Richard Leete said the aging of the world's population is raising questions for the 21st century: Should retirement ages be raised? (washingtonpost.com)
  • Since the Cairo conference, the world's population has grown from 5.7 billion to 7 billion people. (greenpeace.org)
  • The Western world's population grew rapidly over the 19th and 20th centuries, with a dip in 1918-19 because of World War I and the Spanish flu pandemic. (cato.org)
  • As production increased, prices fell , calorie consumption increased, and undernourishment fell even as the world's population grew. (cato.org)
  • The major role of immigration in national growth builds on the pattern of recent decades, during which immigrants and their U.S.-born children and grandchildren accounted for most population increase. (pewsocialtrends.org)
  • 41% of the population growth occurred from natural change (births minus deaths), 59% through net international migration and an increase of 2,700 people in the armed forces population based in the UK. (ons.gov.uk)
  • This is the lowest annual population growth since 2004 due to a fall in net migration, fewer births and more deaths than previously seen. (ons.gov.uk)
  • Population Geography is the study of spatial variations in distribution, density, composition and growth of human numbers on earth. (angelfire.com)
  • Population growth would outstrip food supply, and mass starvation would follow. (angelfire.com)
  • It is the study of the ways in which spatial variations in the distribution, composition, migration, and growth of populations are related to the nature of places. (wikipedia.org)
  • [1] Given the rapidly growing global population as well as the baby boom in affluent countries such as the United States, these geographers studied the relation between demographic growth, displacement, and access to resources at an international scale. (wikipedia.org)
  • However more recently, and especially in the 20th and 21st centuries, due to growth in technology, education, and medical care, the world population has increased rapidly, as many more people have survived to child-bearing age. (wikipedia.org)
  • Because of this increase, some countries have adopted policies to try to control population growth. (wikipedia.org)
  • A pyramid with a wider base and a smaller top, thus a triangle shape, shows rapid population growth, while a more rectangular shape shows a more stable population. (wikipedia.org)
  • Slow Down Population Growth. (wikipedia.org)
  • With a population officially over 1.3 billion and an estimated growth rate of 0.494%, China is very concerned about its population growth and has attempted with mixed results to implement a strict birth limitation policy. (globalsecurity.org)
  • A series of hemacytometer slides to allow students to practice counting populations and plotting their growth. (slideshare.net)
  • The first five years of the twenty-first century saw a decline in the overall volume of population growth, with the world ' s population increasing at a rate of about seventy-six million people per year as of 2005. (encyclopedia.com)
  • At the end of the eighteenth century, economist Thomas Malthus (1766 - 1834) concluded that, if unchecked, populations would be subject to exponential growth . (encyclopedia.com)
  • He feared that population growth would surpass growth in food production, leading to ever increasing famine and poverty. (encyclopedia.com)
  • Under these circumstances, the rate of growth of the population is constant and equal to the intrinsic rate of increase r . (encyclopedia.com)
  • What happens to population size over time under exponential growth ? (encyclopedia.com)
  • Exponential growth is also known as "J-shaped growth" because the shape of the curve of population size over time resembles the letter "J." Also, because the rate of growth of the population is constant, and does not depend on population density, exponential growth is also called "density-independent growth. (encyclopedia.com)
  • Survey of past and current trends in the growth of the population of the world and of selected regions. (princeton.edu)
  • As an alternative, BLM is seeking to develop a contraceptive to reduce population growth rates. (usgs.gov)
  • have to manage rapid population growth. (bbc.co.uk)
  • have to manage slow or negative growth and an ageing population. (bbc.co.uk)
  • Most LEDCs are experiencing rapid population growth. (bbc.co.uk)
  • LEDCs have a high population-growth rate which means that they have many young dependants. (bbc.co.uk)
  • Governments in LEDCs and international bodies and charities are working to reduce birth rates and slow down rates of population growth. (bbc.co.uk)
  • In the late 1970s, the Chinese government introduced a number of measures to reduce the country's birth rate and slow the population growth rate. (bbc.co.uk)
  • If this doesn't sound high, consider that a growth rate of only 3 per cent will cause the population of a country to double in less than 24 years! (bbc.co.uk)
  • But by the 1970s the government realised that current rates of population growth would soon become unsustainable. (bbc.co.uk)
  • The birth rate in China has fallen since 1979, and the rate of population growth is now 0.7 per cent. (bbc.co.uk)
  • A MAJOR United Nations meeting in New York this week is setting the scene for how the world handles population growth into the 21st century. (csmonitor.com)
  • Nafis Sadik, executive director of the UN Population Fund and secretary-general of the 170-nation Cairo conference, points out the importance of reducing growth rates that result in an additional 90 million people each year. (csmonitor.com)
  • Overall, there is a much broader understanding of how everything connects,'' says Susan Weber, executive director of the research and advocacy group Zero Population Growth. (csmonitor.com)
  • For forty years, since the first United Nations environment meeting in Stockholm in 1972, environmentalists have debated whether we should include human population growth among the urgent challenges of human consumption, industrial toxins, species loss, global warming, and so forth. (greenpeace.org)
  • The original strategy, adopted by 180 nations, cited women's rights, birth control, and economic development as keys to stabilizing population growth. (greenpeace.org)
  • Growth advocates claim that industrial development leads to lower population growth, but that is not always the case. (greenpeace.org)
  • If the government is not aware of the actual population growth rate, it cannot run the state for the welfare of the common person. (ipsnews.net)
  • Unfortunately, for the Pakistani government, all the development planning for the last 19 years has been done without knowledge about the actual growth or size of the population. (ipsnews.net)
  • A very early but hopelessly naive attempt at a population growth model is the Fibonnaci numbers . (optusnet.com.au)
  • Additionally, the Logistic Growth model features an inherent limit to growth, which acts as a feedback mechanism to cause the growth rate to decline as the population increases. (optusnet.com.au)
  • As you will see, it is argued that Couttsian Growth represents a universal law of population growth and is exponential in nature. (optusnet.com.au)
  • As you will see, this approach fundamentally challenges the usual assumptions built into population growth models around limits to growth and population density feedback mechanisms. (optusnet.com.au)
  • This is not to say that limits to growth and population density are not important - they are important. (optusnet.com.au)
  • But the first thing is find a single population growth model which applies to all populations of all species for all time. (optusnet.com.au)
  • Now for Population C plot points for a third line, but this time vary the growth rate for each year between 1% and 2% inclusive for as long as it takes you to double your original figure. (optusnet.com.au)
  • Analysis of the factors affecting human population growth and distribution, migration patterns, and the relationship between economic activity and population trends. (uvm.edu)
  • The steepest growth has come in Nevada, where employment and population increases have led the nation for five consecutive years. (csmonitor.com)
  • Paul Ehrlich, founder and first president of the Zero Population Growth organization, was born in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. (google.com)
  • In mid-1989 Bolivia had an estimated population of 6.6 million with a projected annual growth rate of 2.5 to 2.6 percent from 1980 to 2000. (countrystudies.us)
  • The estimated population growth rate in 1989 was 2.1 percent. (countrystudies.us)
  • Population growth followed access and feeder roads in the region and was concentrated at the middle elevations. (countrystudies.us)
  • The Population Division of the United Nations Economic and Social Commission for Asia and the Pacific (ESCAP) projected 896.5 million by mid-1993 with a 1.9 percent annual growth rate. (countrystudies.us)
  • The United States Bureau of the Census, assuming an annual population growth rate of 1.8 percent, put India's population in July 1995 at 936,545,814. (countrystudies.us)
  • The upward population spiral began in the 1920s and is reflected in intercensal growth increments. (countrystudies.us)
  • Population growth in the years between 1950 and 1970 centered on areas of new irrigation projects, areas subject to refugee resettlement, and regions of urban expansion. (countrystudies.us)
  • Japan's population, excluding resident foreigners, fell at the beginning of this year at its fastest pace since comparable figures were kept in 1968, highlighting the demographic challenge to economic growth. (voanews.com)
  • Population ageing will tend to lower both labor-force participation and savings rates, thereby raising concerns about a future slowing of economic growth. (nber.org)
  • These factors suggest that population ageing will not significantly impede the pace of economic growth in developing countries. (nber.org)
  • Implications of population ageing for economic growth, " Oxford Review of Economic Policy, Oxford University Press, vol. 26(4), pages 583-612, Winter. (nber.org)
  • These monumental agglomerations of people, buildings, factories, roads, and vehicles-along with their associated social systems-have manifold and powerful environmental impacts, as well as effects on fertility and population growth rates, that we are only beginning to understand. (worldwatch.org)
  • Please remember that you can also explore population growth, fertility rates, and the changing age make-up of the population using HumanProgress.org 's interactive maps and charts). (cato.org)
  • If the present growth rate of 1.3 percent per year persists, the population will double again within a mere 50 years. (worldwatch.org)
  • India, with nearly 1.1 billion people (living on approximately one-third the land of either of the United States or China), has a current population growth rate of 1.7 percent per year. (worldwatch.org)
  • The U.S. Bureau of the Census reported in 2003 that sustaining the current growth rate of about 1.1 percent per year will double the population to 600 million in less than 70 years. (worldwatch.org)
  • Population Growth and Technological Change: One Million B.C. to 1990 ," The Quarterly Journal of Economics , Oxford University Press, vol. 108(3), pages 681-716. (repec.org)
  • In an Op-Ed published in the Boston Globe, MacArthur President Jonathan Fanton calls on the international community to invest further in slowing population growth around the world. (macfound.org)
  • If this growth rate continues for the remainder of the year the population will increase by 0.2 percent in 2004. (cbs.nl)
  • The population growth of 12 thousand inhabitants in the first six months is less than half the 28 thousand counted in the first half of 2003. (cbs.nl)
  • If the growth rate does not recover in the second half of 2004 the population will grow by fewer than 30 thousand inhabitants this year. (cbs.nl)
  • These periods of low population growth coincided with periods of economic recession. (cbs.nl)
  • The relation between the economy and population growth is intensified as the birth rate also correlates to the economy. (cbs.nl)
  • This often involves factors such as where populations are found and how the size and composition of these populations is regulated by the demographic processes of fertility , mortality , and migration . (wikipedia.org)
  • The Oxford Institute of Population Ageing, however, concluded that population ageing has slowed considerably in Europe and will have the greatest future impact in Asia, especially as Asia is in stage five (very low birth rate and low death rate) of the demographic transition model.Shaban, Mostafa (2020). (wikipedia.org)
  • Population ageing arises from two (possibly related) demographic effects which are increasing longevity and declining fertility. (wikipedia.org)
  • In Oct 2015, China has decided to end its decades-long one-child policy to cope with looming demographic problems, in terms of low fertility, gender discrepancy and rapid ageing population. (springer.com)
  • Check out the key titles, chapters and freely accessible journal articles on recent demographic studies in China's population. (springer.com)
  • Most demographic data come from population censuses, vital registration systems, national registers, and surveys. (encyclopedia.com)
  • We used simulation modeling to examine the potential demographic and genetic consequences of applying a mare sterilant to wild horse populations. (usgs.gov)
  • A census counts the entire population and housing stock of a given country and collects information on its main characteristics (geographic, demographic, social and economic, plus household and family characteristics). (europa.eu)
  • Population increases in the Southwest have been the most outstanding demographic trend of the past 41 years," says Andy Grose, president of a demographic tracking firm, Westrends. (csmonitor.com)
  • The Department of Sociology's Certificate in Population Studies prepares undergraduate students for careers requiring demographic skills or for entering graduate programs in related areas. (umass.edu)
  • The African American community is active online as the demographic joins the wired population. (clickz.com)
  • Recent studies have pointed to gaps between the broadband population in the U.S., and the slower adoption rate among the specific demographic of the African American population. (clickz.com)
  • The course module Population Geographies deals with population trends, demographic behaviour and their inseparable link with place and culture. (rug.nl)
  • In addition to research articles, the journal also publishes Demographic Debates featuring invited contributions on topics related to the ongoing scientific debates in population research. (oeaw.ac.at)
  • Demography is the study of population characteristics. (angelfire.com)
  • Population geography involves demography in a geographical perspective. (wikipedia.org)
  • Demographics (or demography) is the study of population statistics, their variation and its causes. (wikipedia.org)
  • A major purpose of demography is to inform government and business planning of the resources that will be required as a result of population changes. (wikipedia.org)
  • She is in close working relationship with Chinese scholars studying demography and related topics, including population studies, migration, aging, family studies etc. (springer.com)
  • The CPD brings together leading population researchers from disciplines across social science and health fields, including demography, economics, epidemiology, and sociology as well as computer science, geography and social work. (mcgill.ca)
  • The Vienna Yearbook of Population Research has been published by the Vienna Institute of Demography of the Austrian Academy of Sciences since 2003. (oeaw.ac.at)
  • Populations of indigenous people in southern Africa carry a gene that causes lighter skin, and scientists have now identified the rapid evolution of this gene in recent human history. (phys.org)
  • In previous work , the researchers looked at pigmentation variation in two KhoeSan populations from South Africa by performing a genome-wide association analysis in about 450 individuals. (phys.org)
  • The population of South Africa and three neighbours is also expected to reduce, but as a result of the AIDS. (newscientist.com)
  • That's a difference of 660 million people, nearly equivalent to the current population of Africa. (csmonitor.com)
  • A 1992 study of India's population notes that India has more people than all of Africa and also more than North America and South America together. (countrystudies.us)
  • In Africa, despite the AIDS epidemic, the populations of most countries also are expanding. (worldwatch.org)
  • Both languages and genes experience descent with modification, and both are affected by evolutionary processes such as migration, population divergence, and drift. (pnas.org)
  • The two main contributors to population change are natural change (births minus deaths) and net migration (the difference between long-term moves into and out of the UK or local areas). (ons.gov.uk)
  • Further information can be found in the Quality and Methodology Information (QMI) reports for population estimates and for internal migration estimates , and in the Methodology Guide . (ons.gov.uk)
  • The change in total population over a period is equal to the number of births, minus the number of deaths, plus or minus the net amount of migration in a population. (wikipedia.org)
  • Nairobi is a prime example of that migration, with its population pushing upward and its boundaries pushing outward. (nasa.gov)
  • The US is expected to be one of a handful of developed nations whose population will continue to grow strongly, largely through an inward migration of more than a million people a year. (newscientist.com)
  • A 2016 study by the U.S. Geological Survey concluded that because of ongoing low population levels, there is an 11% to 57% risk that the eastern monarch migration could collapse within the next 20 years. (usatoday.com)
  • [2] As a whole, they make up 40.4% of the foreign population in Japan according to Japan's 2000 census. (google.com)
  • The current illegal immigrant population in Japan was estimated to be between 150,000 and 300,000 in the year 2000, in comparison to the legal foreign population of over 1.5 million. (google.com)
  • Populations PCT-4, PCT-7 and GPIRAT-10 were introduced in the second semester of 1996 and evaluated until early 2000, leading to the development of PIACuba-1 and PIACuba-2 (Pérez Polanco et al . (fao.org)
  • 2000). The first is a product of introducing four Cuban varieties into GPIRAT-10, and the second resulted when PCT-4 was used as a base population to introduce five varieties grown in the country. (fao.org)
  • The programme also ensured that, for each generation, a minimum of 200 male-sterile plants were harvested, as recommended by Geraldi and Souza (2000), to prevent changes in the populations allelic frequencies. (fao.org)
  • The largest ethnic group is the Han Chinese, who constitute about 91.5% of the total population (2000 census). (globalsecurity.org)
  • The overall goal of the one-child policy was to keep the total population within 1.2 billion through the year 2000. (globalsecurity.org)
  • Tuesday's announcement that India's population will be 1 billion on May 11, 2000 the anniversary of its multiple nuclear tests provided a stark reminder of the choice between feeding millions and becoming a nuclear power. (washingtonpost.com)
  • Rice is a major ingredient in the diet of urban and rural populations in Central America (CA) and the Caribbean, where it is considered as a staple grain. (fao.org)
  • The 400-million reduction equates to the current populations of the US, Canada and Mexico combined. (newscientist.com)
  • This enormous increase in the global urban population will be greater than the current populations of China, India, the United States, Indonesia, and Mexico combined. (worldwatch.org)
  • New evidence reveals a previously unrecorded indigenous population and poses a major challenge to existing theories about the earliest Americans. (newsweek.com)
  • Abortion's role in family planning, men's responsibilities in controlling family size and rearing children, the treatment of women by societies and spouses, the education gap between girls and boys in developing nations, sexually transmitted diseases, the growing disparity between rich and poor, immigration's role in affecting population trends, population growth's impact on food production and the environment, and rights of indigenous peoples. (csmonitor.com)
  • Responsible for rising food prices, biofuel plantations also represent a danger for indigenous populations as significant as climate change itself. (france24.com)
  • There are no official statistics from 100 years ago, before Taiwan's human population rapidly expanded, but Hwang says there are a large number of indigenous Taiwanese traditions relating to the bears that go back centuries. (cnn.com)
  • The database includes data from civil registration systems, population censuses, and sample surveys available as of August 2019 and covers the time period from 1950 to the present. (un.org)
  • China's 2002 Population and Family Planning Law and policy permit one child per family, with allowance for a second child under certain circumstances, especially in rural areas, and with guidelines looser for ethnic minorities with small populations. (globalsecurity.org)
  • PEKING - The world's most populous nation grew by 11.64 million people in 1985, bringing China's total population to 1.046 billion, the State Statistical Bureau said Friday. (latimes.com)
  • For example, China's present population of 1.4 billion, despite the governmental policy of permitting only one child per couple, is still growing at an annual rate of 0.6 percent. (worldwatch.org)
  • The Center's projections are based on detailed assumptions about births, deaths and immigration levels-the three key components of population change. (pewsocialtrends.org)
  • All population projections have inherent uncertainties, especially for years further in the future, because they can be affected by changes in behavior, by new immigration policies, or by other events. (pewsocialtrends.org)
  • The report also offers two alternative population projections, one based on lower immigration assumptions and one based on higher immigration assumptions. (pewsocialtrends.org)
  • The government's goal is to stabilize the population in the first half of the 21st century, and 2009 projections from the US Census Bureau are that the Chinese population will peak at around 1.4 billion by 2026. (globalsecurity.org)
  • see Population Projections, this ch. (countrystudies.us)
  • Population projections show that in about 10 years, Canada may have more people at the age where they can leave the labor force than at the age where they can begin working. (ibtimes.com)
  • Examples can be shown through population density maps. (wikipedia.org)
  • Because the resolution of the data from different nations varies, some small areas with high populations (such as Rio de Janeiro, Brazil) appear to have moderate population density spread over large areas. (nasa.gov)
  • Together, these population parameters, or characteristics, describe how the population density changes over time. (encyclopedia.com)
  • Population density measures the number of individuals per unit area, for example, the number of deer per square kilometer. (encyclopedia.com)
  • One way to measure population density is simply to count all the individuals. (encyclopedia.com)
  • Alternatively, good estimates of population density can often be obtained via the quadrat method. (encyclopedia.com)
  • For example, it has been used to determine the population density of soil species such as nematode worms. (encyclopedia.com)
  • It is also commonly used to measure the population density of plants. (encyclopedia.com)
  • Continuing with yesterday's post on population density in The Caves of Steel , consider the description of Trantor provided by the Encyclopedia Galactica excerpt that opens section three of "The Psychohistorians", where we learn that "Its urbanizattion, progressing steadily, had finally reached the ultimate. (theatlantic.com)
  • That'd put the population density of Trantor at a bit less than what you see in the present-day United Kingdom. (theatlantic.com)
  • Density of population does not of itself determine the ease with which infection spreads through a population. (britannica.com)
  • Population density has risen concomitantly with the massive increases in population. (countrystudies.us)
  • by 1991 there were 267 persons per square kilometer--up almost 25 percent from the 1981 population density (see table 4, Appendix). (countrystudies.us)
  • India's average population density is higher than that of any other nation of comparable size. (countrystudies.us)
  • Overpopulation occurs when the population of a living species exceeds the carrying capacity of its ecological niche. (encyclopedia.com)
  • A population describes a group of individuals of the same species occupying a specific area at a specific time. (encyclopedia.com)
  • Although this is straightforward in theory, determining population densities for many species can be challenging in practice. (encyclopedia.com)
  • The quadrat method is particularly suited to measuring the population densities of species that are fairly uniformly distributed over the habitat. (encyclopedia.com)
  • It has now been listed as Endangered due to its small population size, a fact not apparent when it was treated as the same species as the Greater Sage-Grouse. (usgs.gov)
  • Wild horse populations can increase rapidly, resulting in the need for removal of animals in order to protect the habitat that horses share with numerous other species. (usgs.gov)
  • We conducted a range-wide genetic survey of the species which included 46 populations and over 1000 individuals using both mitochondrial sequence data and data. (usgs.gov)
  • The species is naturally resistant to penicillins, and members of the population often carry acquired resistance to multiple antimicrobials. (nature.com)
  • The white-tailed deer population, for example, is ecologically excessive in 73 percent of its range in North America, and other deer species tip the scales in up to 41 percent of their range. (scientificamerican.com)
  • The team found that the more a bird species relied on the forest understory for nesting and food, the more it was adversely affected by a sizable deer population. (scientificamerican.com)
  • This is usually reflected in an increase in the population's mean and median ages, a decline in the proportion of the population composed of children, and a rise in the proportion of the population composed of elderly. (wikipedia.org)
  • More specifically, it is the large decline in the overall fertility rate over the last half century that is primarily responsible for the population ageing in the world's most developed countries. (wikipedia.org)
  • When fertility begins to decline from elevated levels, the population distribution by age changes. (un.org)
  • Fast-falling birth rates and rising AIDS deaths are stifling the population explosion - and could lead to a decline in global population in the second half of the 21st century. (newscientist.com)
  • The reasons for the population decline are complicated, but one thing is clear: The new farm bill isn't helping . (motherjones.com)
  • The population of the UK at 30 June 2017 exceeded 66 million people (66,040,229), an increase of 392,000 people since mid-2016. (ons.gov.uk)
  • These are the official population estimates for the UK as at 30 June 2017 and therefore reflect the size of the usually resident UK population a year on from the EU referendum (23 June 2016). (ons.gov.uk)
  • Chinese mainland's population has increased to 1.373 billion by Nov. 1, 2015, 33.77 million more than in 2010, when the sixth national census was conducted, the National Bureau of Statistics (NBS) said 20 April 2016. (globalsecurity.org)
  • The International Center for Reach on Women (ICRW) recently awarded Population Council's Eunice Muthengi with the 2016 Paula Kantor Award for Excellence in Field Research. (popcouncil.org)
  • The population has not grown as rapidly as he predicted. (angelfire.com)
  • The U.S. population-among the most heavily consuming in the world-is growing rapidly. (worldwatch.org)
  • Vienna, April 14 (IANS) The number of Muslims living in Austria has increased rapidly to almost 700,000 people, or 8 per cent of the total population, figures from the Interior Ministry revealed. (yahoo.com)
  • Individuals who carry two copies of the lighter pigmentation gene are 14 percent lighter-skinned than the population average, the researchers said. (phys.org)
  • The foundations for establishing the programme lay in training its researchers in the methodology, and introducing and evaluating populations available at CIAT, Colombia. (fao.org)
  • Researchers in population studies also focus on methodology. (encyclopedia.com)
  • The disease, which originated in livestock, could now threaten Mongolia's entire Saiga population, the researchers said. (rferl.org)
  • Restoring a native predator is helping the red squirrel population rebound after decades of competition with their grey cousins, researchers said. (rte.ie)
  • To obtain a solid comparison, the researchers studied islands with a range of deer history: two of the islands had no deer at all, two had deer populations for about 20 years and two had deer for more than 50 years. (scientificamerican.com)
  • Between late 1996 and 2001, we worked with different populations, both introduced and created in the country. (fao.org)
  • Desde la segunda mitad del año 1996 y hasta el 2001 se ha venido trabajando con las poblaciones introducidas y las creadas en el país. (fao.org)
  • India's population is likely to exceed the 1 billion mark before the 2001 census. (countrystudies.us)
  • The overall population rose to 31.6 million in 2006 from 30 million in 2001, a relatively small figure for the world's second-largest country. (ibtimes.com)
  • The last time such statistics were taken in 2001, the total was 346,000, meaning the Muslim population has since doubled, according to the data issued on Thursday. (yahoo.com)
  • Population ageing is an increasing median age in a population due to declining fertility rates and rising life expectancy. (wikipedia.org)
  • Most countries have rising life expectancy and an ageing population (trends that emerged first in developed countries, but which are now seen in virtually all developing countries). (wikipedia.org)
  • The UN predicts the rate of population ageing in the twenty-first century will exceed that of the previous century. (wikipedia.org)
  • Countries vary significantly in terms of the degree and pace of ageing, and the UN expects populations that began ageing later will have less time to adapt to its implications. (wikipedia.org)
  • Population ageing is a shift in the distribution of a country's population towards older ages. (wikipedia.org)
  • Population ageing is widespread across the world. (wikipedia.org)
  • Of these two forces, it is declining fertility that is the largest contributor to population ageing in the world today. (wikipedia.org)
  • Because many developing countries are going through faster fertility transitions, they will experience even faster population ageing than the currently developed countries in the future. (wikipedia.org)
  • Canada has the highest per capita immigration rate in the world, partly to counter population ageing. (wikipedia.org)
  • The C. D. Howe Institute, a conservative think tank, has suggested that immigration cannot be used as a viable means for countering population ageing. (wikipedia.org)
  • The Division produces World Population Ageing on a regular basis. (un.org)
  • Will urbanization and an ageing population help or hinder efforts to adapt to a warming world? (slideshare.net)
  • The next five decades are also set to see a massive ageing of the world population. (newscientist.com)
  • We also used this methodology to generate the synthetic population for Brussels, Belgium where the data availability was highly limited. (repec.org)
  • This study aims to describe the distribution of serum cholesterol in a community living population of older adults in Ireland and to examine the awareness, treatment and control of hypercholesterolaemia according to CVD risk status. (springer.com)
  • The aim of this study is to document the distribution of serum cholesterol in a community living population of older adults aged 50-79 years in Ireland and apply clinical guideline targets [ 9 ] to examine the awareness, treatment and control of hypercholesterolaemia in a subgroup aged 50-64 years according to their absolute risk of CVD. (springer.com)
  • One way to visualize population change is to examine population pyramids. (wikipedia.org)
  • We will examine the effects of mutation, selection, inbreeding, gene flow, and genetic drift on changes in allele frequency in populations. (washington.edu)
  • We will now examine a series of population models, each of which is applicable to different environmental circumstances. (encyclopedia.com)
  • China and India remain the two largest countries in the world, each with more than 1 billion people, representing 19 and 18 % of the world s population, respectively. (globalsecurity.org)
  • But by 2022, the population of India is expected to surpass that of China. (globalsecurity.org)
  • The population of China was approximately 1.38 billion in 2015, compared with 1.31 billion in India. (globalsecurity.org)
  • The 1991 final census count gave India a total population of 846,302,688. (countrystudies.us)
  • India accounts for some 2.4 percent of the world's landmass but is home to about 16 percent of the global population. (countrystudies.us)
  • The magnitude of the annual increase in population can be seen in the fact that India adds almost the total population of Australia or Sri Lanka every year. (countrystudies.us)
  • Clearly, the future configuration of India's population (indeed the future of India itself) depends on what happens to the birth rate (see fig. 8). (countrystudies.us)
  • In India urban agglomerations with a population of 1 million or more--there were twenty-four in 1991--are referred to as metropolitan areas. (countrystudies.us)
  • Taken together, the populations of China and India constitute more than one-third of the total world population. (worldwatch.org)
  • It is campaigning to fulfill the goal of the 1994 U.N. population conference to provide basic education for all children, especially girls, by 2015, since research shows that educated women have fewer children. (washingtonpost.com)
  • Earlier international population conferences were held in 1974 and 1984, but the 1994 International Conference on Population and Development to convene in Cairo this September is far more ambitious - and, therefore, more controversial - in the scope of problems to be addressed. (csmonitor.com)
  • If there is a major philosophical difference in the 1994 version of the once-a-decade international conference on population, it is the shift from ``population control'' to ``women's empowerment'' - especially in areas of reproductive health, education, and economic opportunities, which planners of the UN conference see as closely linked to fertility rates. (csmonitor.com)
  • The technical assistance component of Maine's quality improvement programs began in 1994, prompted by the closure of a nursing facility whose population was made up primarily of residents with major psychiatric diagnoses and problem behaviors. (hhs.gov)
  • The Conference was organized within the framework of the global ICPD beyond 2014 review on implementation of the Programme of Action agreed upon at the International Conference on Population and Development in Cairo in 1994 (ICPD PoA). (unece.org)
  • Develop a health determinants platform that will surface population health risks from patient variables, such as gender, age, and personal or family health history. (sas.com)
  • that is, demographers study population determinants and consequences including size, composition, how populations change over time, and the processes influencing those changes. (encyclopedia.com)
  • Unless climate policies take people into account, they will fail to mitigate climate change or to shield vulnerable populations from the potentially disastrous impacts. (slideshare.net)
  • Course examines bridging of "individual-centered" epidemiology and "macro-epidemiology" to recognize social, economic and cultural context, assess impacts on populations, and provide inputs for public health and health policy. (princeton.edu)
  • Population models can incorporate genetic data to assess potential impacts of different management strategies on connectivity, effective population size, and genetic diversity. (usgs.gov)
  • And by monitoring the understory and keeping tabs on bird populations, biologists will have a better means for regulating deer numbers. (scientificamerican.com)
  • UNITED NATIONS A population clock at U.N. headquarters hit 6 billion Tuesday and started racing toward 7 billion as an anxious world pondered what the new millennium holds for an increasingly crowded planet. (washingtonpost.com)
  • Next year, in September 2014, the United Nations will convene a special session on human population . (greenpeace.org)
  • According to the Population Division of the United Nations Department of International Economic and Social Affairs, the population had already reached 866 million in 1991. (countrystudies.us)
  • Nearly 12 million UK residents were aged 65 years and over in mid-2017, or 18.2% of the population, with the large 1947-born cohort now being aged 70 years. (ons.gov.uk)
  • This release combines the first release of national and subnational population estimates for England and Wales for mid-2017 with those of Scotland, and Northern Ireland to provide a picture of the UK. (ons.gov.uk)
  • TED-Ed (2014-05-05), Population pyramids: Powerful predictors of the future - Kim Preshoff, retrieved 2017-04-05 Explaining population change, from the European statistics. (wikipedia.org)
  • Dec 7 2017 (Dawn, Pakistan) - There is no doubt that conducting a population census is an important planning and development tool for a country's policymakers. (ipsnews.net)
  • We also present some preliminary results of strategies for population improvement and line development, and indicate prospects and future work plans of the Cuban rice genetic improvement programme. (fao.org)
  • The rice genetic improvement programme (RGIP) of the Cuban Rice Research Institute began working in the area of population management at the same time as did other countries in Latin America, that is, in 1996. (fao.org)
  • The first stage in managing these germplasm materials was to select, within the populations, those genes that would help increase the potential for yield and, at the same time, improve the grain quality of the materials being used by Cuba s conventional genetic improvement programme. (fao.org)
  • Within the framework of a new research project, CIAT and CIRAD began, in April 2002, an upland rice PPB programme, using population improvement methods. (fao.org)
  • The gene that causes lighter skin pigmentation, SLC24A5, was introduced from eastern African to southern African populations just 2,000 years ago. (phys.org)
  • The community's two residents, Mike and Mary Finnegan, organized a family reunion with the help of Ancestry.com that swelled the town's population by more than 2,000 percent. (newsweek.com)
  • The Population Division monitors levels and trends in the population age distribution and analyses their socio-economic implications, including for the living arrangements of older persons. (un.org)
  • This requires providers to understand the financial implications of population health management and work together with other providers across the continuum of care. (constantcontact.com)
  • The study has implications for understanding bird populations in such regions and for managing deer abundance. (scientificamerican.com)
  • however, few countries know whether their older population are living the extra years of life in good or poor health. (wikipedia.org)
  • The Partnership for Health in Aging (PHA) was formed by the American Geriatrics Society to "to prepare America's formal and informal caregiving workforce to provide quality care for America's aging population, and to ensure the financial feasibility of providing that care. (asha.org)
  • The Population Health Research Network (PHRN) has been established to build a nationwide data linkage infrastructure capable of securely and safely managing health information from around Australia. (youtube.com)
  • With the establishment of the PHRN, data linkage units and managing nodes now operate across every state and territory in Australia, allowing population health research to be carried out more thoroughly and more effectively. (youtube.com)
  • Why SAS ® for population health? (sas.com)
  • How is a landmark population health study helping the state of Nevada address some of its most complex health problems? (sas.com)
  • Analyze population health outcomes and their correlations to participant genetic information and varying environmental factors such as air and water quality. (sas.com)
  • With long-term efficacy of contraception, however, comes increased concern about the genetic health of populations and about the potential for local extirpation. (usgs.gov)
  • Provides an international platform for discussions of population, health and development issues. (springer.com)
  • Clearly, human population figures have an impact on the health of natural ecosystems. (greenpeace.org)
  • The population attributable fraction (PAF) is an epidemiologic measure widely used to assess the public health impact of exposures in populations. (bmj.com)
  • For providers, this means having a deep understanding of population health management and their specific role in the continuum of care. (constantcontact.com)
  • We can conduct a population health assessment to benchmark current characteristics of performance and identify steps in a strategic plan to position your organization to become a strong partner in a clinically integrated network. (constantcontact.com)
  • Population health addresses the health status and health issues of the aggregate population. (himss.org)
  • It brings significant health concerns into focus and addresses ways in which communities, healthcare providers, and public health organizations can allocate resources to overcome the problems that drive poor health conditions in the population, e.g. diabetes, obesity, autism, heart disease, etc. (himss.org)
  • Information technology is a part of the core infrastructure on which population health can be assessed and addressed. (himss.org)
  • In this section, articles will describe population health in more depth and will explain the role of information technology in improving population health. (himss.org)
  • Under the Affordable Care Act's expansion of Medicaid, 25 states and the District of Columbia have broaden their health coverage for low-income individuals and the uninsured-the population the law was originally intended to help. (foxbusiness.com)
  • It's a way of connecting the population within the health-care system. (foxbusiness.com)
  • Generally, information from these surveys has been used to look at the effect of nutrition, particularly micronutrients, on the health status of the population, or subgroups within the population. (scienceblogs.com)
  • This course allows the student, under faculty guidance, to engage in a limited research project unrelated to his or her thesis or dissertation, but concerned with their area of study (Population Health Sciences, Clinical Sciences, Rehabilitation Sciences, or Public Health). (utmb.edu)
  • A deeper understanding of K. pneumoniae population structure and diversity will be important for the proper design and interpretation of experimental studies, for interpreting clinical and public health surveillance data and for the design and implementation of novel control strategies against this important pathogen. (nature.com)
  • Genomic analysis of diversity, population structure, virulence, and antimicrobial resistance in Klebsiella pneumoniae , an urgent threat to public health. (nature.com)
  • It is also necessary for the effective delivery of health care, both to individuals and to populations. (hhs.gov)
  • The field of population health changes constantly, presenting new challenges and allowing you to work at the cutting edge of the nation's public health issues to make a real difference. (edu.au)
  • The Population Health major will give you a strong foundation in health science with skills in scientific investigation, critical thinking and problem solving. (edu.au)
  • Knowledge and skills in population health, leadership, research, health promotion, epidemiology and disease prevention are coupled with personal and professional development. (edu.au)
  • Population Health major graduates are highly employable, however if you wish to undertake further study there are several pathways to consider. (edu.au)
  • In Honours in Population Health you will complete a research project under supervision and undertake relevant research training units. (edu.au)
  • Honours in Population Health prepares you for careers in the health industry that require superior research skills and advanced problem solving and communication skills. (edu.au)
  • You can also undertake a coursework Graduate Certificate in Population Health Studies , Master of Public Health or Master of Health Science . (edu.au)
  • The Population Health major offers an excellent foundation for the Doctor of Medicine , Doctor of Dental Medicine and Doctor of Podiatric Medicine courses. (edu.au)
  • Earlier this year, East Hampton officials issued a draft deer management plan stating that "the uncontrolled explosion in the deer population has reached an emergency level" and represents a threat to public health and safety, personal property and the environment. (newsday.com)
  • Seventy-two percent of African American Internet users seek out health content, compared to 53 percent of the general online population. (clickz.com)
  • MacArthur has announced four grants totaling nearly $2 million in support of international policy work related to its population and reproductive health priorities. (macfound.org)
  • The aging population raises the critical questions of continued workforce participation, retirement sufficiency and health care for this growing group. (mercer.com)
  • Because of the use of taxation data to infer population size, detailed data for numerous Ottoman urban centers - towns with more than 5,000 inhabitants - is accurate. (wikipedia.org)
  • Many university-based population studies centers are located throughout the United States , such as the University of Michigan ' s Population Studies Center and the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill ' s Carolina Population Center. (encyclopedia.com)
  • Demographers further assess the distribution of populations by region, country, province or state, urban or rural area, and by neighborhood. (encyclopedia.com)
  • This goal of this study is to develop a spatially explicit habitat-population modeling framework to assess the viability of Gunnison Sage-grouse and each of the seven populations (Gunnison Basin and six satellite populations). (usgs.gov)
  • The goal of this report was to assess telemedicine services that substitute for face-to-face medical diagnosis and treatment and that may apply to the Medicare population. (nih.gov)
  • The course is intended for graduate students in Sociology and the Office of Population Research. (princeton.edu)
  • Specifically, the displacement of thousands of residents of the former Palestine and the wholesale destruction of over 500 Arab villages created a refugee population that is, today, the world's largest (over 4 million) and longest-lasting, including over two generations. (wikipedia.org)
  • Refugee populations are some of the world's poorest, most insecure, most fragile, and most dependent communities. (wikipedia.org)
  • They are based on the census and are updated annually to account for population change during the period from 1 July to 30 June. (ons.gov.uk)
  • A 20th-century Turkish professor, İbrahim Hakkı Akyol , also considers the 1844 as an underestimation of the total Ottoman population because the taxes to be set for each vilayet and kaza would be based on the census result, and the population wanted to avoid them. (wikipedia.org)
  • Thus, census records of the Armenian population became important. (wikipedia.org)
  • Population and housing census (short 'census') data are a rich source of statistical information, ranging from the lowest geographical divisions, covering small areas, to the national and international levels. (europa.eu)
  • The recent census places the gender ratio in the population at 105, which implies there are 95 women for 100 males in the population. (ipsnews.net)
  • The real population from Swiss census is used to compare the performance of simulation based synthesis with the standard IPF. (repec.org)
  • National and subnational mid-year population estimates for the UK and its constituent countries by administrative area, age, sex and components of population change. (ons.gov.uk)
  • Components of population change are births and deaths, immigrants and emigrants. (angelfire.com)
  • Finally, contributions on Data & Trends map long-term developments as well as recent trends in various components of population change in Austria and in Europe. (oeaw.ac.at)
  • Mortality is the number of deaths in a defined population. (angelfire.com)
  • The number of deaths can be projected as the sum of the numbers of each age and sex in the population multiplied by their respective mortality rates. (wikipedia.org)
  • For many centuries, the overall population of the world changed relatively slowly: very broadly, the numbers of births were balanced by numbers of deaths (including high rates of infant immortality). (wikipedia.org)
  • They recorded births and deaths periodically and compared lists indicating the population in each district. (wikipedia.org)
  • the mortality rate is the number of deaths in some population, scaled to the size of that population, per unit of time. (encyclopedia.com)
  • Attributable deaths and disability-adjusted life-years caused by infections with antibiotic-resistant bacteria in the EU and the European Economic Area in 2015: a population-level modelling analysis. (nature.com)
  • Between 1911 and 1920, the birth and death rates were virtually equal--about forty-eight births and forty-eight deaths per 1,000 population. (countrystudies.us)
  • Pioneered by Glenn Trewartha, Wilbur Zelinsky, William A. V. Clark, and others in the United States, as well as Jacqueline Beujeau-Garnier and Pierre George in France, it focused on the systematic study of the distribution of population as a whole and the spatial variation in population characteristics such as fertility and mortality. (wikipedia.org)
  • The death rate, also called mortality rate, describes the number of individuals who die in a population per unit time. (encyclopedia.com)
  • The U.N. General Assembly finally intends to implement a population stabilization plan devised twenty years ago at the U.N. population conference in Cairo. (greenpeace.org)
  • The social and economic consequences of population change. (princeton.edu)
  • However, behavioral responses (including greater female labor force participation) and policy reforms (including an increase in the legal age of retirement) can mitigate the economic consequences of an older population. (nber.org)
  • BDA China estimates that since the end of February, the country has surpassed the US in total internet population. (theregister.co.uk)
  • For more recent population estimates, see Facts about Bolivia . (countrystudies.us)
  • However, estimates of India's population vary widely. (countrystudies.us)
  • Including the metropolitan areas, there were 299 urban agglomerations with more than 100,000 population in 1991. (countrystudies.us)
  • Between 1961 and 1971, the country's population increased by 24.8 percent. (countrystudies.us)
  • Fertility is the number of live births in a defined population. (angelfire.com)
  • In a letter to a national meeting Tuesday on population controls, he said the strict limit on family size saved the world 300 million births. (washingtonpost.com)
  • U.N. demographers had determined that the population would hit 6 billion on Tuesday, a doubling of the Earth's inhabitants in less than 40 years. (washingtonpost.com)
  • With more than 1 billion people 15 to 24 just entering their reproductive years, the next population milestone will depend on the decisions they make about family size. (washingtonpost.com)
  • A population growing at 1% doubles in 70 years, and a population growing at 2% doubles in 35 years (or doubles twice in 70 years). (optusnet.com.au)
  • A death rate of 13 per 1,000 inhabitants and a life expectancy of fifty-two years for males and fifty-six years for females in 1989 contributed to a population that was predominantly young. (countrystudies.us)
  • People have been moving from the countryside to the city for at least 9,000 years, but this key population trend has now become one of the most visible and profound forces on Earth: 2008 is the first year in which more than half of us have become city dwellers. (worldwatch.org)
  • Global population has doubled during the last 45 years. (worldwatch.org)
  • The populations of Chad and Ethiopia, for example, are projected to double in 21 and 23 years, respectively. (worldwatch.org)
  • Even if all the people in the world adopted a policy of only two children per couple, it would take approximately 70 years before the world population would finally stabilize at about 12 billion, twice the current level. (worldwatch.org)
  • There's been a population explosion since World War 2. (angelfire.com)
  • This is according to the UN "2015 Revision of World Population Prospects", released 29 July 2015. (globalsecurity.org)
  • Find the answers in the State of World Population 2009. (slideshare.net)
  • UNFPA's State of World Population 2009 is about the human dimension of climate change, going beyond technology as the problem or the solution. (slideshare.net)
  • World population today is 5.7 billion,'' she says. (csmonitor.com)
  • This year's UN population conference is unique in the heavy role of nongovernmental organizations (NGOs) from around the world. (csmonitor.com)
  • World governments, the public, and the UN now recognize that the human population number matters in achieving ecological sustainability for human communities. (greenpeace.org)
  • Virtually every nation in the world seeks more commodities for its citizens, and a growing population multiplies the effect of this growing per-capita resource consumption. (greenpeace.org)
  • Almost half of the global population living in every region of the world now has below-replacement fertility. (umass.edu)
  • In 1960, when the world population numbered only 3 billion, approximately 0.5 hectare of cropland per capita was available, the minimum area considered essential for the production of a diverse, healthy, nutritious diet of plant and animal products like that enjoyed widely in the United States and Europe. (worldwatch.org)
  • Despite a substantial reduction in population mean TC from a high of 6.0 mmol/L in the 1980s to 5.1 mmol/L, this study reports a failure to control hypercholesterolaemia to recommended risk-stratified targets in the Irish adult population. (springer.com)
  • The development of farming and introduction of livestock during the Neolithic Revolution was an opportunity for the African wolf and boosted populations, suggests study. (newsweek.com)
  • the geographic analysis of population phenomena (the inter-relations among real differences in population with those in all or certain other elements within the geographic study area). (wikipedia.org)
  • I say, "appear to be," because no good, population-based study had been carried out to date. (scienceblogs.com)
  • We excluded articles that did not study the Medicare population (e.g., children and pregnant adults) or used a service that historically required face-to-face encounters (e.g., not radiology or pathology diagnosis). (nih.gov)
  • [a] It focuses on the characteristics of population distributions that change in a spatial context. (wikipedia.org)
  • The earliest and most enduring form of population geography emerged in the 1950s, as part of spatial science . (wikipedia.org)
  • A few types of maps that show the spatial layout of population are choropleth , isoline , and dot maps. (wikipedia.org)
  • The concept is equivalent to the "range" in central place theory and retailing, which delineates the market area of a central place for a particular good or service, and is dependent on the spatial distribution of population and the willingness of consumers to travel a given distance to purchase particular goods or services. (wikipedia.org)
  • If r is negative, the population declines quickly to extinction. (encyclopedia.com)
  • 3) The human population goes extinct and atmospheric carbon declines to 0. (repec.org)
  • We analyze, jointly and in parallel, phoneme inventories from 2,082 worldwide languages and microsatellite polymorphisms from 246 worldwide populations. (pnas.org)
  • Of the 117 million people added to the population during this period due to the effect of new immigration, 67 million will be the immigrants themselves and 50 million will be their U.S.-born children or grandchildren. (pewsocialtrends.org)
  • In microeconomics, a threshold population is the minimum number of people needed for a service to be worthwhile. (wikipedia.org)
  • In geography, a threshold population is the minimum number of people necessary before a particular good or service can be provided in an area. (wikipedia.org)
  • Population change is simply the change in the number of people in a specified area during a specific time period. (wikipedia.org)
  • These display graphically how many people of each gender there are in each age bracket in a given population. (wikipedia.org)
  • An increase in longevity raises the average age of the population by increasing the numbers of surviving older people. (wikipedia.org)
  • The clock was inside a display set up by the U.N. Population Fund, which has advocated the right of people to determine the size of their families. (washingtonpost.com)
  • The morbidity rate refers to the number of people who have a disease compared to the total number of people in a population. (encyclopedia.com)
  • UCL research into the BRCA gene mutation in the Jewish population show that only assessing family history misses half of the people with the mutation. (ucl.ac.uk)
  • Prison advocates say the move is beneficial for all parties, as states have long grappled with how to continue treatment for people once they leave the prison population. (foxbusiness.com)
  • Extrapolating to the U.S. population, that means that almost 90 million people are colonized with this pathogen. (scienceblogs.com)
  • Canada's population is aging so quickly that in a decade, there could be more people leaving the work force than entering it, a factor which will pose major challenges for employers, Statistics Canada said on Tuesday. (ibtimes.com)
  • People aged 65 or older accounted for 27.2 percent of the total population, the highest ratio on record, while the ratio of those aged 14 or younger fell to a record low of 12.7 percent, the data showed. (voanews.com)
  • In most non-OECD countries, declining fertility rates will cause labor-force-to-population ratios to rise as the shrinking share of young people will more than offset the skewing of adults toward the older ages. (nber.org)
  • According to the Population Reference Bureau, each day almost a quarter-million people are added to the roughly 6.4 billion who already exist. (worldwatch.org)
  • 11. Recognize the capabilities that people trained as population geographers have for the labour market. (rug.nl)
  • Of the 8.77 million people living in the country, the vast majority are still Roman Catholics, numbering at 5.16 million or 59 per cent of the total population. (yahoo.com)
  • Linguistic data are often combined with genetic data to frame inferences about human population history. (pnas.org)
  • Reliable population based data are required in order to monitor the management of hypercholesterolaemia, provide evidence for policy and evaluate cardiovascular disease programmes at a national level. (springer.com)
  • If you're looking for a different kind of population data, a guide to what else may be of interest is available in the Related statistics section. (ons.gov.uk)
  • The data were derived from population records based on political divisions such as states, provinces, and counties. (nasa.gov)
  • The official data derived from extending the taxation values to the total population. (wikipedia.org)
  • We will also consider how closely population data from laboratory experiments and from studies of natural populations in the wild fit these models. (encyclopedia.com)
  • and uses of model life tables and stable population analysis and other techniques of estimation when faced with inaccurate or incomplete data are studied. (princeton.edu)
  • As an example of the latter approach, the authors of a recent BMJ paper 8 calculated the population attributable fraction (PAF) of concurrent benzodiazepine/opioid use for the risk of opioid overdose in a retrospective analysis of claim data. (bmj.com)
  • Data from four NHANES cycles (encompassing 2007 through 2014) were aggregated and re-weighted to match known population totals for Los Angeles County - California. (cdc.gov)
  • The Estimation of Population Microdata by Using Data from Small Area Statistics and Samples of Anonymised Records ," Environment and Planning A , , vol. 30(5), pages 785-816, May. (repec.org)
  • The overall population, which combines both Japanese and resident foreigners, fell 0.1 percent from a year ago to 127,907,086, the data showed. (voanews.com)
  • Sixty-percent of African American Web users, and 40 percent of the general online population, visit financial content including account information, stocks, and new financial accounts. (clickz.com)
  • The number of working-age Americans and children will grow more slowly than the elderly population, and will shrink as a share of the total population. (pewsocialtrends.org)
  • Males accounted for 51.22 percent of the total population, while females made up 48.78 percent, the report said. (globalsecurity.org)
  • The population living in urban areas totaled 767.5 million, or 55.88 percent of the total, up by 6.2 percentage points from the 2010 figure, while the population categorized as rural fell to 605.99 million. (globalsecurity.org)
  • These records were not a total count of population. (wikipedia.org)
  • Abdolonyme Ubicini , a French historian and journalist, was one of the first to publish the 1844 figure by adding that he considers it an underestimation of the total Ottoman Armenian population. (wikipedia.org)
  • The total population size may be estimated by looking at the proportion of individuals in the second capture set that are marked. (encyclopedia.com)
  • A total of 455 telemedicine programs were identified, representing 30 medical specialties and serving many diverse populations. (nih.gov)
  • Though genetics of skin pigmentation has shown recent advancements in the last decade, studies involving populations of South Asia, one of the major hot spots of pigmentation diversity, is still in its infancy. (phys.org)
  • South Asia's population increased roughly 5 percent between 1901 and 1911 and actually declined slightly in the next decade. (countrystudies.us)
  • The continent's urban population has skyrocketed. (nasa.gov)
  • Microsimulation of urban systems evolution requires synthetic population as a key input. (repec.org)
  • Initial studies sought to actively maintain the three introduced populations and understand their performance under Cuban conditions. (fao.org)
  • The most comprehensive and authoritative representative of the trend and achievement of Chinese population and development studies. (springer.com)
  • The journal, hosted by China Population and Development Research Center, draws on the energetic and resourceful Chinese research community as well as in close contact with the Asian research community in the area, features the Asian perspective on the field of population studies. (springer.com)
  • This journal publishes original research papers including empirical studies, theoretical and methodological analysis, policy reviews, and survey reports in population and development related fields. (springer.com)
  • As previous studies have shown that those who are colonized are at a higher risk of subsequent MRSA disease, this puts a significant amount of our population--and particularly, our children--at risk of developing serious disease due to this bacterium, which is extremely difficult to treat. (scienceblogs.com)
  • Find specifics on the career application of population studies. (umass.edu)
  • To receive the Certificate in Population Studies, a minimum 2.0 GPA must be maintained across courses applied to certificate requirements. (umass.edu)
  • He became a member of the faculty at Stanford University in 1959 and was named Bing Professor of Population Studies in 1976. (google.com)
  • But according to biologist Sylvain Allombert of the Center for Functional Evolution and Biology in Montpellier, France, and colleagues, few studies have considered the overabundance of deer, whose populations are reaching historic peaks. (scientificamerican.com)
  • These trends, when put together with results from this and previous studies, underline the potential role of deer abundance as a factor explaining negative population trends in forest songbirds, a role probably still under-estimated," the authors write. (scientificamerican.com)
  • BIO A 482: Human Population Genetics. (washington.edu)
  • The first is John H. Relethford, Human Population Genetics, 1st ed. 2012 (Wiley-Blackwell). (washington.edu)
  • A short research paper on a topic in human (or primate) population genetics is required. (washington.edu)
  • The goal, of course, is for you to immerse yourself in recent literature in human population genetics. (washington.edu)
  • Furthermore, although geographically isolated populations lose genetic diversity via genetic drift, phonemes are not subject to drift in the same way: within a given geographic radius, languages that are relatively isolated exhibit more variance in number of phonemes than languages with many neighbors. (pnas.org)
  • An expert in population biology, ecology, evolution, and behavior, Ehrlich has published more than 600 articles and scientific papers. (google.com)
  • However, knowledge of K. pneumoniae ecology, population structure or pathogenicity is relatively limited. (nature.com)
  • If r is exactly zero, then the population size is stable and does not change. (encyclopedia.com)
  • Different countries face varying problems when attempting to manage population change. (bbc.co.uk)
  • A measure of population change over time which tracks birth and death rates. (bbc.co.uk)
  • The recent history of population management policies in China illustrates population-change management problems. (bbc.co.uk)
  • In 1950 the rate of population change in China was 1.9 per cent each year. (bbc.co.uk)
  • On a global scale, both genetic distance and phonemic distance between populations are significantly correlated with geographic distance. (pnas.org)
  • The WSJ article recognizes problems associated with declining working-age populations-especially when it comes to unsustainable social security commitments those countries have made to their elderly. (cato.org)
  • As the population ages, the spending trend threaten to reach unsustainable levels absent reforms. (imf.org)
  • We show that the initial peopling followed a southward expansion facilitated by the coast, with sequential population splits and little gene flow after divergence, especially in South America. (nih.gov)
  • The most recent volume ( 2020, Volume 18 ) of the Vienna Yearbook of Population Research has been published online first in summer 2020. (oeaw.ac.at)
  • Generally speaking, to avoid burdening the reasoning with the usual baggage of assumptions, the Exponentialist approach is not to focus primarily on why populations grow and shrink. (optusnet.com.au)
  • The Exponentialist framework used to explore the secondary issue of why populations grow and shrink can be summed up by the familiar theory of Natural Selection (and associated Artificial Selection ), which in turn leads to Exponentialist theory of Malthusian Selection (which includes a number of exogenous factors such as seasons). (optusnet.com.au)
  • Instead, the Exponentialist focus is on how populations grow and shrink. (optusnet.com.au)
  • As of 1986 the policy for minority nationalities was two children per couple, three in special circumstances, and no limit for ethnic groups with very small populations. (globalsecurity.org)
  • Examples of population pyramids by year can be found. (wikipedia.org)
  • Population PIACuba-1 was obtained in the 1999 dry season, and PIACuba-2 in the rainy season of the same year, after determining the performance of the introduced populations and choosing those that had the most potential for the country. (fao.org)
  • Monarch butterfly population dwindled for second straight year in Mexico Monarch populations are measured by the number of acres of trees occupied by clustering butterflies that spend the winter in Mexico. (usatoday.com)