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  • somatic
  • Somatic polyploidy promotes cell function under stress and energy depletion: evidence from tissue-specific mammal transcriptome. (nih.gov)
  • Thus, somatic polyploidy may be an ingenious evolutionary instrument for fast adaptation to stress and new environments allowing trade-offs between high functional demand, stress, and energy depletion. (nih.gov)
  • For the 2019 meeting, which will take place at the beautiful city of Ghent, we are trying to put together an exciting program focusing on many different aspects of polyploidy, such as the short- and long-term ecological and evolutionary consequence of polyploidy for plant and animal systems, but also polyploidy in somatic cells and clonal populations will be discussed. (vibconferences.be)
  • Genes
  • Adams KL, Cronn R, Percifield R, Wendel JF (2003) Genes duplicated by polyploidy show unequal contributions to the transcriptome and organ-specific reciprocal silencing. (springer.com)
  • To shed light on this paradox and to find out how polyploidy contributes to organ functions, we review here the ploidy-associated shifts in activity of narrowly expressed (tissue specific) genes in human and mouse heart and liver, which have the reciprocal pattern of polyploidization. (nih.gov)
  • The duplication of all genes in a genome is the most obvious consequence of polyploidy. (plantcell.org)
  • mitosis
  • Endoreduplication (also referred to as endoreplication or endocycling) is replication of the nuclear genome in the absence of mitosis, which leads to elevated nuclear gene content and polyploidy. (wikipedia.org)
  • colchicine
  • The present study aimed at exploring an effective way to produce polyploidy using seeds or buds from three herbaceous peony cultivars ('Fen Yu Nu', 'Zhu Sha Pan' and 'Zhong Sheng Fen') by colchicine treatment. (ishs.org)
  • genetic
  • Since evolutionists need an increase in information in the genome in order to go from molecules to man, polyploidy is postulated to be a mechanism to increase genetic information available to a population. (answersingenesis.org)
  • spontaneous
  • Polyploidy was first discovered by Winkler in 1916 during his observations of a spontaneous autopolyploid induced by mechanically damaged tissue (Grant, 1971). (ualberta.ca)
  • genus
  • It is not unreasonable to suppose that such extraordinary polyploidy has contributed to the separation of this genus from its related genera within the family-all from the one original created kind. (wordpress.com)
  • liver
  • And that might be important for, say, liver regeneration or liver diseases, where it's thought that polyploidy in liver cells may be important for liver function, either for liver detoxification or other aspects of liver biology. (bioquicknews.com)
  • mainly
  • The first studies of polyploidy in Pteris focused mainly on ploidy differences and apogamy of P. cretica [ 22 ]. (hindawi.com)
  • In both organs, polyploidy protects vitality (mainly due to the activation of sirtuin-mediated pathways), triggers the reserve adenosine-5'-triphosphate (ATP) production, and sustains tissue-specific functions by switching them to energy saving mode. (nih.gov)
  • recent
  • Polyploidy is more prevalent at high altitudes, high latitudes and in areas of recent glaciation. (ualberta.ca)
  • It has been argued for decades that polyploidy is relatively uncommon in animals, though this has been challenged in recent years. (answersingenesis.org)
  • Although the two members of each gene pair must originally have had identical transcription profiles, less than half of the pairs formed by the most recent polyploidy event still retain significantly correlated profiles. (plantcell.org)
  • known
  • He pointed out that many cells of fruit flies (Drosophila), for example, enter a specialized cell cycle known as the endocycle, which results in polyploidy. (bioquicknews.com)