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  • outbreaks
  • In addition, vaccine-derived polioviruses (VDPVs) can emerge in areas with low OPV coverage to cause polio outbreaks and can replicate for years in persons who have primary, B-cell immunodeficiencies. (cdc.gov)
  • anti-poliovirus
  • By injecting the virus directly into the mouse tumors, the researchers demonstrated that it was possible to reach their target and still avoid interacting with the anti-poliovirus antibodies generated by the vaccine. (rxpgnews.com)
  • vaccination
  • Due to threats from militant extremists, it has not been possible for vaccination teams to properly cover this area, and surveillance for polioviruses has also been inefficient. (virology.ws)
  • repeat doses are unnecessary in those with protective titers against all 3 poliovirus types, but complete the age-appropriate IPV vaccination schedule. (drugs.com)
  • To date the vaccination has been considered a highly effective weapon for containing the polioviruses that cause the disease. (infectioncontroltoday.com)
  • According to the researchers, any viral particles that make it to the bloodstream would be destroyed by antibodies created through poliovirus vaccination. (rxpgnews.com)
  • Continuing to endorse the approach of the GPEI to regard Pakistan and Afghanistan as one epidemiological block with poliovirus corridors that span the two countries, the IMB emphasized on continuing action by the governments of the two countries to work cooperatively to secure strong cross-border arrangements for polio vaccination. (thefreedictionary.com)
  • receptor
  • Poliovirus infection begins with the virus binds to the receptor CD155 on the host cell surface. (news-medical.net)
  • CD155 is an immunoglobulin-like receptor also known as poliovirus receptor. (news-medical.net)
  • These findings indicate that the ability of the Lansing strain of poliovirus to infect mice is likely due to recognition by the viral capsid of a receptor in the mouse central nervous system. (virology.ws)
  • Serves as a receptor for poliovirus attachment to target cells. (abcam.com)
  • To test the virusâ ability to destroy neuroblastoma the researchers constructed a transgenic mouse model that allows growth of neuroblastoma cells and carries the human gene for CD155, which codes for the receptor that allows poliovirus to enter cells. (rxpgnews.com)
  • 1988
  • The global withdrawal of the Sabin type 2 poliovirus vaccine is a test of the feasibility of the plan, declared by the World Health Assembly in 1988, to eradicate all polioviruses. (virology.ws)
  • Subsequently, the Global Polio Eradication Initiative reduced the global incidence of polio associated with wild polioviruses (WPVs) from an estimated 350,000 cases in 1988 to 1,997 reported cases in 2006 and reduced the number of countries that have never succeeded in interrupting WPV transmission from 125 to four (Afghanistan, India, Nigeria, and Pakistan) ( 1 -- 4 ). (cdc.gov)
  • antibodies
  • When rabbits were inoculated with the recombinant poliovirus (the authors called it a chimeric virus), antibodies were made which could block infection with HIV-1. (virology.ws)
  • cVDPV
  • From January 2013 through July 2018, stool samples from 495,035 children with acute flaccid paralysis in 118 countries, and 8528 sewage samples from four countries at high risk for poliovirus transmission were examined for the presence of type 2 OPV or type 2 cVDPV. (virology.ws)
  • Recombinant
  • One described the engineering of a recombinant poliovirus bearing on its surface an antigen from HIV-1. (virology.ws)
  • They wanted me to comment on a report that had just been released by the journal Nature, describing the production of a recombinant poliovirus bearing an antigen from HIV-1. (virology.ws)
  • paralysis
  • It is important that all countries, in particular those with frequent travel and contacts with poliovirus-affected countries and areas, strengthen surveillance for cases of acute flaccid paralysis (AFP) in order to rapidly detect any new virus importations and to facilitate a rapid response. (who.int)
  • Will The Poliovirus Eradication Program Rid the World of Childhood Paralysis? (whale.to)
  • When the US Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) examined these cases, another mystery was revealed: Only about one-third of the paralysis cases were associated with poliovirus. (whale.to)
  • Most acute flaccid paralysis diagnosed around the world today is NOT associated with poliovirus. (whale.to)
  • Is it correct to assume that poliovirus causes most cases of paralysis? (whale.to)
  • As a consequence, the vaccine recipient excretes polioviruses that can cause paralysis. (virology.ws)
  • strain
  • Before we produced transgenic mice susceptible to poliovirus , we had studied the Lansing strain of type 2 poliovirus because it had the unusual ability to infect wild type mice (polioviruses normally only infect certain primates). (virology.ws)
  • The Stony Brook researchers took advantage of this viral property by injecting a stable, attenuated strain of poliovirus directly into neuroblastoma tumors transplanted into 12 mice engineered to contract polio. (rxpgnews.com)
  • sewage
  • Recently 5 of 27 sewage samples taken from different parts of the province of Balochistan in Pakistan have tested positive for poliovirus. (virology.ws)
  • Full-scale field tests on the chlorination of poliovirus in sewage were conducted using the effluent at a small trickling filter plant. (asce.org)
  • mice
  • Surprisingly, the researchers also discovered that the poliovirus treatment effectively protected the mice against new tumor growth, a significant factor when fighting a disease like neuroblastoma, which is known to reoccur following chemotherapy. (rxpgnews.com)
  • The mice were then vaccinated against poliovirus. (rxpgnews.com)
  • The lab-built poliovirus, described online this week by Science , killed mice and was almost indistinguishable from the original. (sciencemag.org)
  • transmission
  • Programmatic strategies implemented in 2007 included expanded use of type 1 monovalent oral poliovirus vaccine (OPV) (mOPV1) to eliminate type 1 WPV (WPV1) transmission before type 3 WPV (WPV3)* ( 6 ) and targeted use of type 3 monovalent OPV (mOPV3) in selected areas ( 1 -- 4 ). (cdc.gov)
  • 2002
  • Toyoda and his colleagues work in the laboratory of Stony Brook professor Eckard Wimmer, Ph.D., who in 2002 synthesized poliovirus from its basic chemical components. (rxpgnews.com)
  • viral
  • â A tamed poliovirus represents a significant step in finding viral treatments that can kill tumors without harming patients,â said Hidemi Toyoda, M.D., Ph.D., a pediatrician and postdoctoral research fellow in Stony Brookâ s Department of Molecular Genetics and Microbiology. (rxpgnews.com)
  • Based on the properties of the synthetic poliovirus, Wimmer created the highly attenuated virus used in this study by substituting a single nucleotide, located in a functionally important portion of the viral RNA genome called a â spacer regionâ , with an essential regulatory gene removed from elsewhere in the viral genome. (rxpgnews.com)
  • Based on the properties of the synthetic poliovirus, Wimmer created the highly attenuated virus used in this study by substituting a single nucleotide, located in a functionally important portion of the viral RNA genome called a "spacer region", with an essential regulatory gene removed from elsewhere in the viral genome. (emaxhealth.com)
  • exposure
  • Use of the minimum age and minimum intervals (4 weeks) during the first 6 months of life should only be done when the vaccine recipient is at risk for imminent exposure to circulating poliovirus (shorter intervals and earlier start dates may lead to lower seroconversion) (CDC/ACIP 2009). (drugs.com)
  • 1 9 105 166 200 However, IPV is recommended in unvaccinated adults at increased risk of exposure to poliovirus. (drugs.com)
  • laboratory
  • I cannot let September pass without noting that 34 years ago this month, I arrived at Columbia University to start my laboratory to do research on poliovirus (pictured). (virology.ws)
  • I have worked on poliovirus for over thirty-six years, first as a posdoctoral fellow with David Baltimore in 1979, and then in my laboratory at Columbia University. (virology.ws)