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  • Cholera
  • This issue covers the period from 28 April-4 May 2019 and includes updates on Middle East respiratory syndrome coronavirus (MERS-CoV), cholera, dengue, Ebola virus disease, influenza, anthrax, rabies and Shiga-toxigenic Escherichia coli O26. (europa.eu)
  • 2017
  • There were 75,935 notifications to the National Notifiable Diseases Surveillance System (NNDSS) between 1 April to 30 June 2017 (Table 2). (health.gov.au)
  • The A/Singapore and B/Colorado strains were not contained in the 2017/18 season vaccine. (bccdc.ca)
  • strains
  • If a protein based vaccine could be produced that can protect against all strains of the pneumococcus, this would be of tremendous value and our discovery that NLRP3 is needed for protection will point us in the right direction in terms of how to develop such vaccines. (medindia.net)
  • Candidate Salmonella vaccine strains synthesizing pneumococcal surface protein A (PspA) were also confirmed to possess nearly complete lipid A 1-dephosphorylation. (jimmunol.org)
  • Each year there is a new vaccine to protect against the influenza virus strains that are expected in the coming influenza season. (bccdc.ca)
  • dengue
  • This issue covers the period from 19-25 May 2019 and includes updates on rat hepatitis B, dengue, Ebola virus disease, influenza, Legionnaires' disease and P. vivax malaria. (europa.eu)
  • This issue of the ECDC Communicable Disease Threats Report (CDTR) covers the period from 17-23 February 2019 and includes updates on Middle East respiratory syndrome coronavirus (MERS-CoV), chikungunya virus disease and dengue, Ebola virus disease, influenza, Neisseria gonorrhoeae, Salmonella Poona and influenza A(H9N2). (europa.eu)
  • infection
  • Her research has focussed on how the body defends itself against infections with HPV, how to develop vaccines that prevent HPV infection as well as those that might treat HPV infection. (europeanvaccinesdiagnostics.com)
  • Intravascular infections (e.g. thrombus infection, aneurysm ), infective endocarditis (heart valve infections), and systemic bacterial infections (e.g. typhoid) are examples of persistent bacteremia. (medindia.net)
  • The discovery will lead to a dramatic shift in our understanding of how the body's immune system responds to infection caused by Streptococcus pneumoniae and pave the way for more effective vaccines. (medindia.net)
  • With biventricular failure or apnea can occur secondary to dis-sections or underlying lung disease, is a falsepositive, while diet therapy produces an unsightly scar and is more likely to be enhanced by a syndrome of hiv infection. (nrha.org)
  • These slogans are part a toolkit which aims to support infection prevention in schools, with a focus on gastrointestinal diseases, by assisting EU/EEA countries in their communication initiatives for disease prevention in school settings. (europa.eu)
  • Individuals born on or after January 1, 1957 need documentation of one valid dose of a rubella-containing vaccine OR either laboratory evidence of rubella immunity or laboratory confirmed acute rubella infection. (bccdc.ca)
  • protein
  • Matrivax Research and Development Corporation is developing a protein capsular matrix vaccine (PCMV) technology that simplifies synthesis of polysaccharide vaccines with fewer process steps than are required by typical conjugation vaccine processes. (bioprocessintl.com)
  • communicable diseases
  • This page contains an index by subject of articles that were published in Communicable Diseases Intelligence during 2000. (health.gov.au)
  • The prevention, management and control of communicable diseases requires the active participation and cooperation of all health-care professionals and practitioners. (gov.mb.ca)
  • While this manual is intended to act as a guide to the management and control of communicable diseases within the Province of Manitoba, professional judgment will still be required by those charged with providing health care services. (gov.mb.ca)
  • Protocols for specific communicable diseases contain epidemiologic information with reference to provincial and national trends. (gov.mb.ca)
  • The risk for EU/EEA citizens to become infected with communicable diseases during the 2019 hajj is considered low, thanks to the vaccination requirements for travelling to Makkah (Mecca) and the Saudi Arabian preparedness plans that address the management of health hazards during and after hajj. (europa.eu)
  • Immunology
  • Lavelle, who is Lecturer in Immunology in the School of Biochemistry and Immunology, Trinity College Dublin, said: "This is a very exciting finding and supports the development of inflammasome activating vaccines to prevent pneumococcal diseases including pneumonia and septicaemia. (medindia.net)
  • rabies
  • Since children may come in contact with animals infected with rabies without their parents' knowledge, they may be recommended to take the rabies vaccine when travelling to an endemic area. (fhi.no)
  • There is no lower age limit for the rabies vaccine. (fhi.no)
  • immune
  • The researchers state that this new knowledge of how the toxin interacts with the immune system will mean that new vaccines can be developed and targeted more effectively. (medindia.net)
  • Recombinant attenuated Salmonella vaccines (RASVs) can deliver Ags from a variety of pathogens, generating a range of immune responses, including serum Abs, mucosal IgA, and a panoply of cell-mediated immune responses, at local and distal sites ( 1 - 4 ). (jimmunol.org)
  • Despite evidence of direct protection from the group B meningococcal vaccine introduced into the infant immunisation schedule in 2015, no herd immune effect has been observed from this program. (ox.ac.uk)
  • These vaccines contain tiny amounts of material that make your immune system produce certain substances called antibodies. (bccdc.ca)
  • prevention
  • Biological E licensed the technology from Centre for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) in 2012 and the vaccine is being developed at the company's facility in Nantes. (biologicale.com)
  • On 28 January, Public Health England (PHE) launched a new multilingual survey, funded by the European Centre for Disease Prevention and Control (ECDC), which aims to gain an understanding of European healthcare workers' knowledge and attitudes about antibiotics and antibiotic resistance. (europa.eu)
  • whooping cough
  • Sometimes a booster vaccine is needed, such as for whooping cough or tetanus protection. (vic.gov.au)
  • The three-in-one dTpa (reduced antigen) vaccine against diphtheria, tetanus and whooping cough is recommended to be given to women between 28 and 32 weeks gestation in every pregnancy, regardless of the interval between pregnancies, to protect both the mother and the newborn baby from whooping cough. (vic.gov.au)
  • booster
  • You should have a booster if you did not have any vaccine within 10 years and if you are going to travel extensively in Africa, Nepal, India, Cambodia, Viet Nam, Bangladesh, Burma, Pakistan, Russia and former USSR countries. (canadaspastmatters.ca)
  • The vaccine is very long lasting and you would only need a booster if bitten by a rabid dog. (canadaspastmatters.ca)
  • immunity
  • Remember to keep your immunisations up to date, not all the vaccines recommended for people in higher risk occupations provide lifelong immunity. (vic.gov.au)
  • Immunity to rubella is determined by either disease or vaccination history. (bccdc.ca)
  • children
  • In Victoria, a number of vaccine combinations for children are provided for free under the National Immunisation Program. (vic.gov.au)
  • Today it is considered key to protect children from life threatening diseases and conditions and the most cost effective intervention for child survival. (taxguru.in)
  • A study evaluating pneumococcal carriage in 2400 children is underway, and comparisons of data generated by this new survey with historical data will inform optimisation of infant pneumococcal immunisation schedule. (ox.ac.uk)