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  • Neurons
  • Single-cell RNAseq analysis confirmed CHX10 + cells within the differentiated population, which consisted primarily of neurons with some glial and neural progenitor cells. (pnas.org)
  • Writing in tomorrow's Science, they describe how they reprogrammed skin cells from elderly ALS patients, turning them into pluripotent stem cells that they then coaxed to form motor neurons, the very cells that degenerate in this disease. (alzforum.org)
  • Currently, there is no way of culturing motor neurons directly from humans, so studying these derived motor neurons in culture should give researchers an early glimpse into what makes these cells deteriorate and die. (alzforum.org)
  • Traditionally, HD cellular models consisted of either patient cells not affected by disease or rodent neurons expressing expanded polyQ repeats in HTT. (springer.com)
  • As these models can be limited in their disease manifestation or proper genetic context, respectively, human HD pluripotent stem cells (PSCs) are currently under investigation as a way to model disease in patient-derived neurons and other neural cell types. (springer.com)
  • Because they can propagate indefinitely, as well as give rise to every other cell type in the body (such as neurons, heart, pancreatic, and liver cells), they represent a single source of cells that could be used to replace those lost to damage or disease. (wikipedia.org)
  • tissue
  • As such it will be an invaluable source of information for all researchers in the stem cell and tissue regeneration field including bioengineers as well as for all clinicians interested in regenerative therapies, especially for ischemic cardiomyopathies. (springer.com)
  • The potential of iPS cells to help treat everything from damaged heart tissue to Parkinson's disease , has prompted intensive research that has looked into the use of skin fibroblast cells as an alternative to controversial embryonic stem cells. (scientificamerican.com)
  • Fat stem cells, however, seem especially primed for the job, as they are capable of turning into fat, heart, bone or muscle tissue. (scientificamerican.com)
  • Yet further treatments using stem cells could potentially be developed due to their ability to repair extensive tissue damage. (wikipedia.org)
  • Additionally, he co-founded Q Therapeutics, a stem-cell research firm and serves on USDA Cellular Tissue and Gene Therapies advisory committee and more. (wikipedia.org)
  • hPSCs
  • In a multicellular aggregate of hPSCs, intracellular apicosomes from multiple cells are trafficked to generate a common lumenal cavity. (rupress.org)
  • Firstly, an essential prerequisite for using hPSCs in clinical applications is the maintenance of large numbers of homogeneous, undifferentiated stem cells in culture. (springer.com)
  • However, the presence of genetic changes in hPSCs coupled with their increased growth rates is reminiscent of the defining features of cancer cells (Baker et al. (springer.com)
  • Cultures
  • Over time, CHX10 + cells expressed neuronal markers [neurofilament, NeuN, and vesicular glutamate transporter 2 (VGlut2)], and cultures exhibited increased action potential frequency. (pnas.org)
  • In contrast to monolayer cultures, however, the spheroid structures that are formed when ESCs aggregate enables the non-adherent culture of EBs in suspension, making EB cultures inherently scalable, which is useful for bioprocessing approaches, whereby large yields of cells can be produced for potential clinical applications. (wikipedia.org)
  • Such spontaneous formation is often accomplished in bulk suspension cultures whereby the dish is coated with non-adhesive materials, such as agar or hydrophilic polymers, to promote the preferential adhesion between single cells, rather than to the culture substrate. (wikipedia.org)
  • While this method enables control of EB size by altering the number of cells per drop, the formation of hanging drops is labor-intensive and not easily amenable to scalable cultures. (wikipedia.org)
  • organism
  • This cell - the fertilised egg that is totipotent - has the potential to create an entire organism. (explorestemcells.co.uk)
  • These pluripotent stem cells are therefore different than totipotent stem cells because they don't develop into a complete organism. (explorestemcells.co.uk)
  • For many decades, stem cells have played an important role in medical research, beginning in 1868 when Ernst Haeckel first used the phrase to describe the fertilized egg which eventually gestates into an organism. (wikipedia.org)
  • using electroporation (that is, introducing DNA from one organism into the cell of another by use of an electric pulse). (wikipedia.org)
  • State switching (a.k.a. phenotypic switching) is a fundamental physiological process in which a cell/organism undergoes spontaneous, and potentially reversible, transitions between different phenotypes. (wikipedia.org)
  • Skip
  • Being able to skip the mouse feeder cell step necessary with skin cells, along with the shortened culturing period, may make the new method more palatable to the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA), which must approve such treatments for human use and prefers methods that reduce opportunities for contamination. (scientificamerican.com)
  • hESCs
  • Alternatively, to avoid dissociation into single cells, EBs can be formed from hESCs by manual separation of adherent colonies (or regions of colonies) and subsequently cultured in suspension. (wikipedia.org)
  • Adaptation
  • Furthermore, the existence of variant cells creates an essential substrate for in vitro selection whereby mutations that endow cells with improved growth outcompete their normal counterparts and overtake the culture-a phenomenon termed culture adaptation (Baker et al. (springer.com)
  • fibroblast
  • Indeed, they were: According to the team's findings, adipose stem cells can be turned into iPS cells twice as quickly as fibroblast skin cells and with 20 times the efficiency. (scientificamerican.com)
  • Depletion of Mbd3, on the other hand, improves reprogramming efficiency only in fibroblast,[dubious - discuss] that results in deterministic and synchronized iPS cell reprogramming (near 100% efficiency within seven days from mouse and human cells). (wikipedia.org)
  • involves
  • However, since the generation of embryonic stem cells involves destruction (or at least manipulation) of the pre-implantation stage embryo, there has been much controversy surrounding their use. (wikipedia.org)
  • Research
  • The course would be applicable for those in industry aiming to work on stem research and bioprocessing. (ucl.ac.uk)
  • BD Biosciences: Diverse set of tools for stem cell research. (ucl.ac.uk)
  • Ludmila Ruban, Cell Therapy Research Facilitator and Training Coordinator and author of 'Human pluripotent stem cells in culture', recently published by Springer. (ucl.ac.uk)
  • There is hardly an area of research developing so quickly and raising so many promises as stem cell research. (springer.com)
  • Wu and Longaker's research thus far has taken a fairly broad swipe at reprogramming adipose fat stem cells, so the team hopes to refine the process to target only the most efficient candidates. (scientificamerican.com)
  • Whether you're performing basic or more advance characterization, verification is always critical in pluripotent stem cell (PSC) research. (thermofisher.com)
  • Please tell us more about your stem cell research goals so we can help guide you toward the products or services to meet your research needs. (thermofisher.com)
  • Which of the following workflows do you utilize within your stem cell research? (thermofisher.com)
  • Which of the following stem cell types do you use in your research? (thermofisher.com)
  • Drug research is another area that pluripotent stem cells may benefit. (explorestemcells.co.uk)
  • Another current challenge is that the cells used in research are rejected from a person's body due to their immune system. (explorestemcells.co.uk)
  • The positive uses of pluripotent stem cells are enormous but new research and ethical challenges must be taken into account before the public can reap the full benefits. (explorestemcells.co.uk)
  • Political leaders are debating how to regulate and fund research studies that involve the techniques used to remove the embryo cells. (wikipedia.org)
  • Shantanu Sengupta is an Indian cell biologist and a professor at the Institute of Genomics and Integrative Biology (IGIB) of the Council of Scientific and Industrial Research. (wikipedia.org)
  • Her interdisciplinary research interests focus on elucidating and exploiting the mechanisms of cell surface recognition processes, especially those involving protein-glycan interactions. (wikipedia.org)
  • Her research combines tools from organic synthesis, polymer chemistry, structural biology, and molecular and cell biology. (wikipedia.org)
  • Stem Cell Research & Therapy. (wikipedia.org)
  • plasticity
  • Thus, the ability to switch states/phenotypes (phenotypic plasticity) is a key feature of development and normal function of cells within most multicellular organisms that enables the cell to respond to various intrinsic and extrinsic cues and stimuli in a concerted fashion enabling them to 'make' appropriate cellular decisions. (wikipedia.org)
  • In contrast to normal cells, a striking characteristic of cancer cells is the remarkable degree of phenotypic plasticity they exhibit. (wikipedia.org)
  • Lineage
  • thus, they allow tracing the history from the root to individual branches of the cell lineage tree. (hindawi.com)
  • totipotent
  • In the initial hours and days following fertilisation, this single totipotent cell divides into more totipotent cells that are exact copies of the original. (explorestemcells.co.uk)
  • Approximately four days after fertilisation, the totipotent cells start to specialise and form a cluster of cells known as a blastocyst. (explorestemcells.co.uk)
  • Only cells from an embryo at the morula stage or earlier are truly totipotent, meaning that they are able to form all cell types including placental cells. (wikipedia.org)
  • Lines
  • The course is designed for life science and engineering graduates new to stem cell culture or for more experienced individuals new to working with iPSC or hES cell lines. (ucl.ac.uk)
  • Delegates will leave the module with practical knowledge to propagate, maintain and characterize feeder and feeder-free stem cell lines. (ucl.ac.uk)
  • Signaling pathways (retinoic acid, sonic hedgehog, and Notch) that pattern the neural tube were sequentially perturbed to identify an optimized combination of small molecules that yielded ∼25% CHX10 + cells in four hPSC lines. (pnas.org)
  • The predominant genetic changes found in hPSC lines involve changes in chromosome number and structure (particularly of chromosomes 1, 12, 17 and 20), reminiscent of the changes observed in cancer cells. (springer.com)
  • Much of the criticism has been a result of religious beliefs, and in the most high-profile case, US President George W Bush signed an executive order banning the use of federal funding for any cell lines other than those already in existence, stating at the time, "My position on these issues is shaped by deeply held beliefs," and "I also believe human life is a sacred gift from our creator. (wikipedia.org)
  • enables
  • Tang C, Lee AS, Volkmer JP, Sahoo D, Nag D, Mosley AR, Inlay MA, Ardehali R, Chavez SL, Pera RR et al (2011) An antibody against SSEA-5 glycan on human pluripotent stem cells enables removal of teratoma-forming cells. (springer.com)
  • In addition, technologies have also been developed to physically separate cells by forced aggregation of ESCs within individual wells or confined on adhesive substrates, which enables increased throughput, controlled formation of EBs. (wikipedia.org)
  • mice
  • The stem cells grew in culture and could form bone when implanted into mice. (howstuffworks.com)
  • She worked with a multi-institution group based at Boston University that was the first to generate thyroid cell progenitors and thyroid follicular organoids from pluripotent stem cells (PSCs) in mice, and thyroid cell progenitors from induced PSCs in humans. (wikipedia.org)
  • therapeutic
  • however, the lack of a robust source of human V2a interneurons limits the ability to molecularly profile these cells and examine their therapeutic potential to treat spinal cord injury (SCI). (pnas.org)
  • For example, cancer cells undergo epithelial to mesenchymal transition (EMT) that plays important roles in their survival, proliferation, and development of resistance to therapeutic treatments, or switch to a phenotype that mimics stem cell-like features - the so-called Cancer Stem Cells (CSCs) or Tumour-initiating Cells. (wikipedia.org)
  • mammalian
  • however, in mammalian cells, it has been shown that these boundary regions have comparatively high levels of CTCF binding. (wikipedia.org)
  • genetic
  • Every cell in the body has the same genetic instructions. (howstuffworks.com)
  • Li W et al (2009) Generation of rat and human induced pluripotent stem cells by combining genetic reprogramming and chemical inhibitors. (springer.com)
  • Other methods exploit natural forms of gene transfer, such as the ability of Agrobacterium to transfer genetic material to plants, or the ability of lentiviruses to transfer genes to animal cells. (wikipedia.org)