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  • dose
  • Subjects will initiate study medication at an oral dose of 50 mg/day (25 mg/day for East Asians), which will be increased or decreased as clinically indicated to the lowest dose that maintains a stable platelet count 20,000/(micro)L above baseline while maximizing tolerability. (comparetrials.com)
  • The first advantage is that the whole-blood platelets, sometimes called "random" platelets, from a single donation are not numerous enough for a dose to give to an adult patient. (wikipedia.org)
  • levels
  • 8 , 9 Although antibodies against HPA-1a antigen may still be detected after several months at low temperature, attempts to keep platelet glycoprotein expression at normal levels during long-term storage remain problematic. (haematologica.org)
  • In adults, platelets are recommended in those who have levels less than 10,000/ul, less than 20,000/ul if a central venous catheter is being placed, or less than 50,000/ul if a lumbar puncture or major surgery is required. (wikipedia.org)
  • Library
  • Search methods We searched for randomised controlled trials (RCTs) in the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL) (Cochrane Library 2015, Issue 6, 23 July 2015), MEDLINE (from 1946), Embase (from 1974), CINAHL (from 1937), the Transfusion Evidence Library (from 1950), and ongoing trial databases to 23 July 2015. (ox.ac.uk)
  • major
  • Thus, in the field of platelet immunology, the availability of new standardized methods to detect human platelet antibodies, including anti-HPA-1a, remains a major issue. (haematologica.org)
  • demand for platelet
  • Unlike other blood components demand for platelet components appears to be increasing in several countries around the world ( 1 ). (isbtweb.org)
  • An ageing population, an increase in the incidence of haematological malignancies, and changes to the management of haematological malignancies are likely to be the major reasons for the rise in demand for platelet components. (isbtweb.org)
  • donor
  • A transfusion can include all or any one of the blood components, and may come from a donor or may have been harvested from the patient prior to therapy. (blausen.com)
  • Therefore, several units of donor blood plasma are needed to create one unit of platelets. (blausen.com)
  • A pooled platelet transfusion suspended in about 200 mL of plasma from the atopic donor was inferred to be the source of the passively transferred IgE. (cmaj.ca)
  • The term specifically refers to the method of collecting the platelets, which is performed by a device used in blood donation that separates the platelets and returns other portions of the blood to the donor. (wikipedia.org)
  • citation needed] Collecting the platelets from a single donor also simplifies human leukocyte antigen (HLA) matching, which improves the chance of a successful transfusion. (wikipedia.org)
  • Since it is time-consuming to find even a single compatible donor for HLA-matched transfusions, being able to collect a full dose from a single donor is much more practical than finding multiple compatible donors. (wikipedia.org)
  • Whole blood platelets also do not require any additional donor recruitment, as they can be made from blood donations that are also used for packed red blood cells and plasma components. (wikipedia.org)
  • An 'allogeneic' (also called 'homologous') donation is when a donor gives blood for storage at a blood bank for transfusion to an unknown recipient. (wikipedia.org)
  • While the first blood transfusions were made directly from donor to receiver before coagulation, it was discovered that by adding anticoagulant and refrigerating the blood it was possible to store it for some days, thus opening the way for the development of blood banks. (wikipedia.org)
  • glycoprotein
  • CD36 (cluster of differentiation 36), also known as platelet glycoprotein 4, fatty acid translocase (FAT), scavenger receptor class B member 3 (SCARB3), and glycoproteins 88 (GP88), IIIb (GPIIIB), or IV (GPIV) is a protein that in humans is encoded by the CD36 gene. (wikipedia.org)
  • typically
  • The term "blood bank" typically refers to a division of a hospital where the storage of blood product occurs and where proper testing is performed (to reduce the risk of transfusion related adverse events). (wikipedia.org)
  • cancers
  • An ageing population, an increase in the number of people with blood cancer, and changes to the management of these cancers are likely the major reasons for the rise in demand for platelets. (wikipedia.org)
  • 10,000
  • Therefore, in those with no bleeding or only "dry" bleeding, the threshold for transfusion should be between 5,000 and 10,000/µL. (wikipedia.org)
  • thrombocytes
  • and platelets, also called thrombocytes, which assist in the formation of blood clots. (blausen.com)
  • Plateletpheresis (more accurately called thrombocytapheresis or thrombapheresis, though these names are rarely used) is the process of collecting thrombocytes, more commonly called platelets, a component of blood involved in blood clotting. (wikipedia.org)
  • occurs
  • A blood donation occurs when a person voluntarily has blood drawn and used for transfusions and/or made into biopharmaceutical medications by a process called fractionation (separation of whole-blood components). (wikipedia.org)
  • plasma
  • The thawed plasma used in transfusions is called "fresh, frozen plasma" or FFP. (blausen.com)
  • PAS or plasma for storage of platelets? (springer.com)
  • The dilutional coagulopathy after neonatal CPB requires intense damage control resuscitation with massive transfusion of platelets, packed red blood cells (PRBC), cryoprecipitate, fresh frozen plasma (FFP) and supplemental factor concentrates. (clinicaltrials.gov)
  • The overall risk of hemolytic transfusion reactions (HTRs) from plasma (minor)-incompatible platelet (PLT) transfusions and the role of a critical anti-A or anti-B titer in predicting and preventing these reactions has not been clearly established. (nih.gov)
  • A total of 647 of 4288 AP transfusions (15.1%) were plasma incompatible. (nih.gov)
  • No HTRs were reported to any plasma-incompatible AP transfusion during the study period. (nih.gov)
  • Two plasma-incompatible AP transfusions were associated with fever and chills and positive DATs, of which one had a positive eluate. (nih.gov)
  • BSS platelets do not aggregate to ristocetin, and this defect is not corrected by the addition of normal plasma, distinguishing it from von Willebrand disease. (wikipedia.org)
  • The speed at which the sample coagulates depends on the activity of the plasma coagulation system, platelet function, fibrinolysis and other factors which can be affected by genetics, illness, environment and medications. (wikipedia.org)
  • fewer
  • Not only are there fewer platelets circulating, but individuals with XLT also have smaller platelets. (wikipedia.org)
  • Fewer and smaller platelets causes the efficacy of the clotting mechanism in the body to be seriously compromised, which can lead to bruising and bleeding. (wikipedia.org)
  • increases the risk
  • They must be pooled from several donors to create a single transfusion, and this complicates processing and increases the risk of diseases that can be spread in transfused blood, such as human immunodeficiency virus. (wikipedia.org)
  • disorder
  • A patient seen at this hospital recently raised the question once again of the dangers of platelet transfusions in this disorder. (annals.org)
  • 88.5% of people with the disorder have Paris-Trousseau syndrome which is a bleeding disorder and causes a lifelong risk of abnormal bleeding and bruising due to dysfunction in the platelets. (wikipedia.org)
  • BSS presents as a bleeding disorder due to the inability of platelets to bind and aggregate at sites of vascular endothelial injury. (wikipedia.org)
  • donors
  • In poorer countries, established supplies are limited and donors usually give blood when family or friends need a transfusion (directed donation). (wikipedia.org)
  • Vladimir Shamov and Sergei Yudin in the USSR pioneered the transfusion of cadaveric blood from recently deceased donors. (wikipedia.org)
  • function
  • 12 Even after active drug is cleared from the circulation, large numbers of platelets may be needed within the first 48 hours to restore platelet function because transfused platelets do not correct the hemostatic defect in platelets inhibited by ticagrelor. (ahajournals.org)
  • More common tests of blood coagulation include prothrombin time (PT,INR) and partial thromboplastin time (aPTT) which measure coagulation factor function, but TEG also can assess platelet function, clot strength, and fibrinolysis which these other tests cannot. (wikipedia.org)
  • clinical
  • This study aimed to evaluate the clinical, haematological and biochemical responses to autologous blood transfusion and the feasibility of this practice in sheep. (biomedcentral.com)
  • Autologous transfusion in sheep slightly altered the physiological, biochemical and haematological responses of sheep, indicating that the technique proposed is safe and can be applied in the clinical practice of this species. (biomedcentral.com)
  • Considering the lack of studies related to the use of autologous blood transfusions in sheep, as well as the possible clinical, haematological and biochemical changes caused by this therapeutic practice, coupled with the possible contribution of the technique in veterinary medicine surgical interventions, this study aimed to evaluate the clinical, haematological and biochemical responses of sheep undergoing autologous blood transfusions. (biomedcentral.com)
  • Prior to clinical use, amotosalen-treated platelets have been tested and found to be non-carcinogenic when using the established p53 knockout mouse model. (wikipedia.org)
  • mild
  • In most cases leukoagglutination results in mild dyspnea and pulmonary infiltrates within about 6 hours of transfusion, and spontaneously resolves. (wikipedia.org)
  • wound
  • It's thought that " growth factors released from activated platelets initiate and modulate wound healing in both soft and hard tissues , " according to research published in the journal Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery . (mercola.com)
  • Although
  • Although autologous transfusion has been practiced for more than 100 years, there has been an explosive growth of its use in human medicine in recent decades. (biomedcentral.com)
  • normal
  • A megakaryocyte (mega- + karyo- + -cyte, "large-nucleus cell") is a large bone marrow cell with a lobulated nucleus responsible for the production of blood thrombocytes (platelets), which are necessary for normal blood clotting. (wikipedia.org)
  • This test can detect if vWF shows a stronger than normal tendency to aggregate platelets, which can be seen in a subtype of vWD called vWDIIb. (wikipedia.org)
  • high
  • Essential thrombocytosis (ET-Also known as essential thrombocythemia) is a disorder characterized by extremely high numbers of circulating platelets. (wikipedia.org)
  • quality
  • In addition he studied methods of blood transfusions and the quality of available blood and concluded that the procedures were safe and effective. (wikipedia.org)
  • hosting the UK NEQAS external quality assessment scheme for Histocompatibility and Immunogenetics and the Welsh Assessment of Serological Proficiency scheme (WASPS), contribution to the maintenance of quality standards in the transfusion and transplantation community. (wikipedia.org)