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  • seeds
  • Canadian canola seeds sold to Europe by Advanta Canada are discovered to be contaminated with a small percentage of genetically modified (GM) seeds. (historycommons.org)
  • The feral GM plants found most likely originated from imported transgenic seeds that were spilled during transport to oilseed processing facilities. (greenmedinfo.com)
  • The authors of the study propose the feral GT73 OSR "probably originated from spillage of conventional OSR seeds or other seed imports that were contaminated with GM seeds. (greenmedinfo.com)
  • The great Russian botanist Nikolai Vavilov traveled the world collecting and categorizing plants and seeds. (greens.org)
  • Plants created using mutagenesis are sometimes called mutagenic plants or mutagenic seeds. (wikipedia.org)
  • field trials
  • ALLSCHWIL, SWITZERLAND-- In a blow to Swiss biotechnology, the government has rejected a high-profile application to conduct field trials of genetically modified (GM) wheat. (sciencemag.org)
  • The first field trials occurred in France and the USA in 1986, when tobacco plants were engineered for herbicide resistance. (wikipedia.org)
  • This has been present since its early use, the first field trials were destroyed by anti-GM activists. (wikipedia.org)
  • wheat
  • It had previously been planted with barley, wheat, and peas. (historycommons.org)
  • For example, a worthless-looking primordial wheat plant from Turkey is the primitive progenitor in all breeding programs for US wheat. (greens.org)
  • A GM Melon engineered for delayed senescence was approved in 1999 and a herbicide tolerant GM wheat was approved in 2004. (wikipedia.org)
  • The first evidence of plant domestication comes from emmer and einkorn wheat found in pre-Pottery Neolithic A villages in Southwest Asia dated about 10,500 to 10,100 BC. (wikipedia.org)
  • tobacco
  • Researchers find that a new strain of tobacco plant can make antibodies to toxic pond scum that affects humans, livestock and wildlife. (sgul.ac.uk)
  • soybean
  • A genetically modified soybean is a soybean (Glycine max) that has had DNA introduced into it using genetic engineering techniques. (wikipedia.org)
  • First, manufacturers only wanted to use transgenics to be able to grow more soy at a minimal cost to meet this demand, and to fix any problems in the growing process, but they eventually found they could modify the soybean to contain healthier components, or even focus on one aspect of the soybean to produce in larger quantities. (wikipedia.org)
  • Eleven countries grew modified soybean, with the USA, Brazil and Argentina accounting for 90% of the total hectarage. (wikipedia.org)
  • Of the 111 hectares of soybean grown worldwide in 2014, 82% was genetically modified in some way. (wikipedia.org)
  • produce
  • Plants which are exposed to glyphosate are unable to produce aromatic amino acids and in turn die. (wikipedia.org)
  • Plant breeding is the art and science of changing the traits of plants in order to produce desired characteristics. (wikipedia.org)
  • The classical plant breeder may also make use of a number of in vitro techniques such as protoplast fusion, embryo rescue or mutagenesis (see below) to generate diversity and produce hybrid plants that would not exist in nature. (wikipedia.org)
  • One of the ideas was to bombard plants with radiation and produce lots of mutations, some of which, it was hoped, would lead to plants that bore more heavily or were disease or cold-resistant or just had unusual colors. (wikipedia.org)
  • address the world's food needs
  • Critics have objected to GM fish on several grounds, including ecological concerns, animal welfare concerns and with respect to whether using them as food is safe and whether GM fish are needed to help address the world's food needs. (wikipedia.org)
  • crop to be approved
  • For a GM crop to be approved for release in the US, it must be assessed by the Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service (APHIS) agency within the US Department of Agriculture (USDA) and may also be assessed by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) and the Environmental protection agency (EPA), depending on the intended use. (wikipedia.org)
  • foods
  • Foods from GE plants were introduced into our food supply in the 1990s. (fda.gov)
  • Are foods from GE plants safe to eat? (fda.gov)
  • Are Foods from GE plants regulated? (fda.gov)
  • To help ensure that firms are meeting their obligation to market only safe and lawful foods, FDA encourages developers of GE plants to consult with the agency before marketing their products. (fda.gov)
  • The RFC asks for data and information in response to questions about the safety of foods from genome edited plants, such as whether categories of genome edited plants present food safety risks different from other plants produced through traditional plant breeding. (fda.gov)
  • Read more on Foods Derived From Plants Produced Using Genome Editing . (fda.gov)
  • Opinions vary regarding the adequacy of the assessment, but there is no documented proof of an adverse effect resulting from foods produced from GM plants. (springer.com)
  • Because there is no global approval and registration process for foods derived from GM organisms, approvals are country specific, and testing requirements sometimes differ. (springer.com)
  • In Canada, the largest producer of GM canola, GM crops are regulated by Health Canada, under the Food and Drugs Act, and the Canadian Food Inspection Agency are responsible for evaluating the safety and nutritional value of genetically modified foods. (wikipedia.org)
  • Genetically modified foods or GM foods, also known as genetically engineered foods or bioengineered foods, are foods produced from organisms that have had changes introduced into their DNA using the methods of genetic engineering. (wikipedia.org)
  • Genetically modified foods, GM foods or genetically engineered foods, are foods produced from organisms that have had changes introduced into their DNA using the methods of genetic engineering as opposed to traditional cross breeding. (wikipedia.org)
  • Foods produced from or using GM organisms are often referred to as GM foods. (wikipedia.org)
  • These phases became known as the first and second generation of genetically modified (GM) foods. (wikipedia.org)
  • As Peter Celec describes, "benefits of the first generation of GM foods were oriented towards the production process and companies, the second generation of GM foods offers, on contrary, various advantages and added value for the consumer", including "improved nutritional composition or even therapeutic effects. (wikipedia.org)
  • Some countries have approved but not actually cultivated GM crops, due to public uncertainty or further government restrictions, while at the same time, they may import GM foods for consumption. (wikipedia.org)