Loading...
  • species
  • The 1000 plants (oneKP or 1KP) initiative is an international multi-disciplinary consortium that has generated large-scale gene sequencing data for over 1000 species of plants. (google.com)
  • For reference, here is a complete table of plant species/samples sequenced. (google.com)
  • Not all plants are endangered, the Endangered Species Act. (fed.us)
  • Species descriptions of rare plants found on the national forests and grasslands. (fed.us)
  • Some important plant families containing psychoactive species are listed below. (wikipedia.org)
  • Historical observations of the carnivorous syndrome in plant species have been restricted to the more obvious examples of carnivory, such as the active trapping mechanisms of Drosera and Dionaea , though authors have often noted speculation about other species that may not be so obviously carnivorous. (wikipedia.org)
  • Adding to the small but growing list, Francis Lloyd provided his own list of species suspected of carnivory in his 1942 book on carnivorous plants, though these species and their potential were only mentioned in the introduction. (wikipedia.org)
  • The broader definition differs mainly in including plants that do not produce their own digestive enzymes but rely on internal food webs or microbes to digest prey, such as Darlingtonia and some species of Heliamphora . (wikipedia.org)
  • This page is an index of articles on plant species (or higher taxonomic groups) with the same common name ( vernacular name). (wikipedia.org)
  • For instance, a 60 000-year-old Neanderthal burial site, " Shanidar IV ", in northern Iraq has yielded large amounts of pollen from 8 plant species, 7 of which are used now as herbal remedies. (wikipedia.org)
  • ferns
  • The Plantae includes all land plants: mosses, ferns , conifers, flowering plants , and so on an amazing range of diverse forms. (berkeley.edu)
  • The International Plant Names Index (IPNI) is a database of the names and associated basic bibliographical details of seed plants, ferns and lycophytes. (ipni.org)
  • cannabis
  • So we thought we'd take a look at the common questions raised about the evidence and research into cannabis, cannabinoids (the active chemicals found in the plant and elsewhere) and cancer, and address some of the wider issues that crop up in this debate. (cancerresearchuk.org)
  • Humans have been using cannabis plants for medicinal and recreational purposes for thousands of years, but cannabinoids themselves were first purified from cannabis plants in the 1940s. (cancerresearchuk.org)
  • The structure of the main active ingredient of cannabis plants - delta-9 tetrahydrocannabinol (THC) - was discovered in the 60s. (cancerresearchuk.org)
  • Some important examples of psychoactive plants include Coffea arabica ( coffee ), Camellia sinensis ( tea ), Nicotiana tabacum ( tobacco ), and Cannabis (including hashish ). (wikipedia.org)
  • Psychoactive plants have been used ritually ( e.g. , peyote as an entheogen ), medicinally ( e.g. , opium as an analgesic ), and therapeutically ( e.g. , cannabis as a drug ) for thousands of years. (wikipedia.org)
  • Examples of psychoactive compounds of plant origin that do not contain nitrogen are tetrahydrocannabinol (a phytocannabinoid from Cannabis sativa ) and salvinorin A (a diterpenoid from Salvia divinorum ). (wikipedia.org)
  • The ancient Egyptian Ebers Papyrus lists over 800 plant medicines such as aloe , cannabis , castor bean , garlic , juniper , and mandrake . (wikipedia.org)
  • symbiotic
  • Native plants have formed symbiotic relationships with native wildlife over thousands of years, and therefore offer the most sustainable habitat. (nwf.org)
  • adaptations
  • Further research into these plants' carnivorous adaptations may reveal that a few protocarnivorous plants do meet the more rigid definition of a carnivorous plant. (wikipedia.org)
  • The reduced female gametophyte, like the reduced male gametophyte, may be an adaptation allowing for more rapid seed set, eventually leading to such flowering plant adaptations as annual herbaceous life-cycles, allowing the flowering plants to fill even more niches. (wikipedia.org)
  • 1000
  • Dioscorides 's 1st century De materia medica , seen here in a c. 1334 copy in Arabic, describes some 1000 drug recipes based on over 600 plants. (wikipedia.org)
  • medicinal
  • Medicinal plants , also called medicinal herbs , have been discovered and used in traditional medicine practices since prehistoric times. (wikipedia.org)
  • Further, the phytochemical content and pharmacological actions, if any, of many plants having medicinal potential remain unassessed by rigorous scientific research to define efficacy and safety. (wikipedia.org)
  • The earliest historical records of herbs are found from the Sumerian civilisation, where hundreds of medicinal plants including opium are listed on clay tablets. (wikipedia.org)
  • Medicinal plants are widely used in non-industrialized societies, mainly because they are readily available and cheaper than modern medicines. (wikipedia.org)
  • The annual global export value of 50,000 to 70,000 types of plants with suspected medicinal properties was estimated to be US$2.2 billion in 2012, and in 2017, the potential global market for botanical extracts and medicines was estimated at several hundred billion dollars. (wikipedia.org)
  • Medicinal plants face both general threats, such as climate change and habitat destruction , and the specific threat of over-collection to meet market demand. (wikipedia.org)
  • In ancient Sumeria , hundreds of medicinal plants including myrrh and opium are listed on clay tablets. (wikipedia.org)
  • pest
  • For customers in England and Wales, call the Plant Health Helpline on 01904 405 138 to report suspicion of a quarantine plant pest or disease, or for advice and guidance on plant health regulations. (www.gov.uk)
  • alkaloids
  • The active constituents of the majority of psychoactive plants fall within the alkaloids ( e.g. , nicotine , morphine , cocaine , mescaline , caffeine , ephedrine ), a class of nitrogen-containing natural products . (wikipedia.org)
  • attract
  • Enter your zip code to discover the best native plants, attract butterflies and moths, and support birds and other fauna. (nwf.org)
  • nutrients
  • A protocarnivorous plant (sometimes also paracarnivorous , subcarnivorous , or borderline carnivore ), according to some definitions, traps and kills insects or other animals but lacks the ability to either directly digest or absorb nutrients from its prey like a carnivorous plant . (wikipedia.org)
  • 1984), required a plant to exhibit an adaptation of some trait specifically for the attraction, capture, or digestion of prey while gaining a fitness advantage through the absorption of nutrients derived from said prey. (wikipedia.org)
  • Both the strict and broad definitions require absorption of the digested nutrients stipulates that the plant must receive some benefit from the carnivorous syndrome. (wikipedia.org)
  • found
  • Epipremnum aureum - a tropical vining plant, in the Araceae , found in Northern Australia through Malaysia , Singapore and Indochina into China , Japan , Bangladesh , India and Pakistan . (wikipedia.org)
  • Running Bamboo - Information on this plant can be found on the Connecticut Invasive Plant Working Group (CIPWG) website. (ct.gov)
  • roots
  • This virus can be transmitted mechanically, by seed, and by nematodes of the family Trichoridae when they feed on roots of susceptible plants. (umn.edu)
  • Roots and rhizoids function to anchor the plant and acquire minerals in the soil. (wikipedia.org)
  • Organization
  • The operation of these facilities, or the department of an organization which does so, is called "plant operations" or facility management . (wikipedia.org)
  • rely
  • There would still be mushrooms and algae, but there would be no fruits, vegetables, grains, or any animals (which ultimately rely on plants for their food too! (berkeley.edu)
  • refers
  • Physical plant , mechanical plant or industrial plant (and where context is given, often just plant ) refers to the necessary infrastructure used in operation and maintenance of a given facility. (wikipedia.org)
  • commercially
  • Pachira aquatica - a tropical wetland tree of the mallow family Malvaceae , native to Central and South America , known by a variety of common names including Malabar chestnut, French Peanut and provision tree, and is commercially sold under the names money tree and money plant. (wikipedia.org)
  • soil
  • In most plants stems are located above the soil surface but some plants have underground stems . (wikipedia.org)
  • Native plants also assist in managing rain water runoff and maintain healthy soil as their root systems are deep and keep soil from being compacted. (nwf.org)
  • produce
  • Nuclear power plants use the heat generated from nuclear fission in a contained environment to convert water to steam, which powers generators to produce electricity. (ready.gov)
  • Nuclear power plants operate in most states in the country and produce about 20 percent of the nation's power. (ready.gov)
  • Plant embryogenesis is a process that occurs after the fertilization of an ovule to produce a fully developed plant embryo . (wikipedia.org)
  • Monoecious plants produce both egg and sperm in one individual. (earthlink.net)
  • Humans
  • Exotic plants that evolved in other parts of the world or were cultivated by humans into forms that don't exist in nature do not support wildlife as well as native plants. (nwf.org)
  • place
  • Think of a place without plants. (berkeley.edu)
  • Plant or Plante itself may be a metonym (gardener), as with Plantebene (a grower of beans, 1199) and Planterose (a grower of roses, 1221), a metaphor meaning a branch of a family, or a toponym, as with de la Plaunt (1273) and de Plantes (1275, 1282), from a place in France such as le Plantis ( Orne ), or from a planted place such as a vineyard or orchard. (wikipedia.org)
  • The stems keep the leaves in the light and provide a place for the plant to keep its flowers and fruits. (wikipedia.org)
  • Discovering the native plants where you live can also define a unique sense of place and heritage for your garden habitat while preserving the natural history of the flora and fauna of your region. (nwf.org)
  • Physical
  • In broadcast engineering , the term transmitter plant is the part of the physical plant associated with the transmitter and its controls and inputs, the studio/transmitter link (if the radio studio is off-site), the radio antenna and radomes , feedline and desiccation / nitrogen system, broadcast tower and building , tower lighting, generator , and air conditioning. (wikipedia.org)
  • leaf
  • Apparently the monocot lineage was founded by aquatic plants ( Science mag news story , original paper ) and some obscure monocot leaf structure features can be explained by that aquatic origin. (physicsforums.com)
  • Node - a point of attachment of a leaf or a twig on the stem in seed plants. (wikipedia.org)
  • habitat
  • A plant is considered native if it has occurred naturally in a particular region, ecosystem, or habitat without human introduction. (nwf.org)
  • Health
  • An accident could result in dangerous levels of radiation that could affect the health and safety of the public living near the nuclear power plant. (ready.gov)
  • nitrogen
  • The chemical elements of which plants are constructed-principally carbon , oxygen , hydrogen , nitrogen , phosphorus , sulfur , etc.-are the same as for all other life forms animals, fungi, bacteria and even viruses . (wikipedia.org)
  • help
  • BP has applied to the Energy Department to help finance a proposed 32 megawatt solar-power generation plant on Long Island, N.Y., on land belonging to the Energy Department's Brookhaven National Laboratory. (washingtonpost.com)
  • How can I help rare plants? (fed.us)
  • include
  • Donald Schnell, author of the book Carnivorous Plants of the United States and Canada , prefers the term "paracarnivorous" for a less rigid definition of carnivory that can include many of the possible carnivorous plants. (wikipedia.org)
  • primary
  • Its goal is to eliminate the need for repeated reference to primary sources for basic bibliographic information about plant names. (ipni.org)
  • Examples
  • In the table below, a few examples of significant psychoactive plants and their effects are shown. (wikipedia.org)
  • For further examples, see List of psychoactive plants . (wikipedia.org)
  • There are many examples of psychoactive fungi , but fungi are not part of the plant kingdom. (wikipedia.org)
  • Many examples of protocarnivorous plants exist, some of which are counted among the ranks of true carnivorous plants as a matter of historical preference. (wikipedia.org)
  • lead
  • The factors that lead to a plant becoming rare. (fed.us)
  • Robert Plant , lead singer of Led Zeppelin . (wikipedia.org)
  • Plant cells have a number of features that distinguish them from cells of animals , and which lead to major differences in the way that plant life behaves and responds differently from animal life. (wikipedia.org)
  • Group
  • A plant epithet is a name used to label a person or group, by association with some perceived quality of a plant . (wikipedia.org)
  • It is given this name in eudicots because most plants from this group have two cotyledons, giving the embryo a heart shaped appearance. (wikipedia.org)
  • term
  • Some authors prefer the term "protocarnivorous" because it implies that these plants are on the evolutionary path to true carnivory, whereas others oppose the term for the same reason. (wikipedia.org)
  • known
  • On Feb. 15, U.K.-based Kent Renewable Energy Ltd. released an update of commissioning activities at the facility, known as the Kent Renewable Energy CHP plant. (biomassmagazine.com)
  • The ancestors of flowering plants diverged from gymnosperms in the Triassic Period , 245 to 202 million years ago ( mya ), and the first flowering plants are known from 160 mya. (wikipedia.org)
  • power plant
  • Nearly 3 million Americans live within 10 miles of an operating nuclear power plant. (ready.gov)
  • Obtain public emergency information materials from the power company that operates your local nuclear power plant or your local emergency services office. (ready.gov)
  • If you live within 10 miles of the power plant, you should receive the materials yearly from the power company or your state or local government. (ready.gov)
  • If an accident at a nuclear power plant were to release radiation in your area, local authorities would activate warning sirens or another approved alert method. (ready.gov)
  • This month's steam blows are part of the commissioning process, where the power plant will be tested far beyond its normal operating parameters," said Colin Dobson, general manager at the plant. (biomassmagazine.com)