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  • abilities
  • In a majority of these studies, fluid replacement beverages were administered orally after a dehydration challenge and the rehydration abilities of specific replacement beverages were assessed using biomarkers, physical performance evaluations and subjective questionnaires. (biomedcentral.com)
  • He is given a magical suit of armor that bestows many abilities, complementing Uno's peak human mental and physical abilities. (wikipedia.org)
  • He wears an ancient helmet and armor (powered by a "four-dimensional mirror"), from which he derives flight, infrared and X-Ray vision, invisibility, intangibility, bodyheat camouflage, entrapment nets, plasma beams and density manipulation, as well as augmenting his peak physical abilities to superhuman levels. (wikipedia.org)
  • Exercise
  • Background Physical exercise is seen as a promising intervention to prevent or delay cognitive decline in individuals aged 50 years and older, yet the evidence from reviews is not conclusive. (bmj.com)
  • Objectives To determine if physical exercise is effective in improving cognitive function in this population. (bmj.com)
  • Eligibility criteria Randomised controlled trials of physical exercise interventions in community-dwelling adults older than 50 years, with an outcome measure of cognitive function. (bmj.com)
  • Conclusions Physical exercise improved cognitive function in the over 50s, regardless of the cognitive status of participants. (bmj.com)
  • Physical exercise shows promise as a modifiable risk factor to reduce the risk of dementia and related neurodegenerative diseases. (bmj.com)
  • 4 It is hypothesised that the neural and vascular adaptations to physical exercise improve cognitive function through promotion of neurogenesis, angiogenesis, synaptic plasticity, decreased proinflammatory processes and reduced cellular damage due to oxidative stress. (bmj.com)
  • 5 While lifelong participation in physical exercise may be preferable, the adoption of exercise at any age to delay or reverse cognitive decline is worthwhile given the prevalence of physical inactivity and the increasing proportion of older adults in the population. (bmj.com)
  • This study evaluates the effect to a muscle stretching program combined with physical exercise versus a physical exercise program in patients with fibromyalgia. (bioportfolio.com)
  • Researchers believe that exercise is a good countermeasure for the bone and muscle density loss that occurs when humans live for a long time without gravity. (wikipedia.org)
  • He was long an advocate for exercise as a countermeasure for conditions such as bone loss in space. (wikipedia.org)
  • excessive
  • The condition of a structure or part thereof characterized by holes, breaks, rot, crumbling, cracking, peeling, rusting or other evidence of physical decay or neglect, lack of maintenance or excessive use. (ecode360.com)
  • In committee hearings carried between the passage of the 1832 Reform Act through the Commons and Parliament's subsequent dissolution Sadler had elicited testimony from factory workers (current and former), concerned medical men and other bystanders on bad working conditions and excessive working hours to which children were subjected, highlighting the risks to tired children and the brutality to which they might be subjected. (wikipedia.org)
  • live
  • Created by Mike Friedrich, Neal Adams, and Dick Dillin, the character made his first appearance in Justice League of America #94 (1971) John Barrowman and his sister Carole have written a digital comic called Arrow: The Dark Archer, now released as a physical paperback, which focuses on Malcolm Merlyn, the character that John plays on The CW's live-action television series Arrow. (wikipedia.org)
  • space
  • A familiar stranger is an individual who is recognized by another from regularly sharing a common physical space such as a street or bus stop, but with whom one does not interact. (wikipedia.org)
  • The most common problem experienced by humans in the initial hours of weightlessness is known as space adaptation syndrome or SAS, commonly referred to as space sickness. (wikipedia.org)
  • Since then, roughly some 45%[citation needed] to 75% of all people who have flown in space have suffered from this condition. (wikipedia.org)
  • probably
  • It was Carl O. Sauer, a human geographer, who was probably the most influential in promoting and developing the idea of cultural landscapes. (wikipedia.org)
  • At death, the heads of the dogs had been carefully separated from their bodies by humans, probably for ceremonial reasons. (wikipedia.org)
  • natural
  • It is a geographical area - including natural and cultural resources - associated to historical evolution, which gives way to a recognizable landscape for a particular human group, up to the point of being identifiable as such by others. (wikipedia.org)
  • animals
  • Humans are essentially a part of the animal kingdom, so it should have a taxobox like the other animals here om Wikipedia. (wikipedia.org)
  • Dog breeds are dogs that have relatively uniform physical characteristics developed under controlled conditions by humans, with breeding animals selected for phenotypic traits such as size, coat color, structure, and behavior. (wikipedia.org)
  • believe
  • Marx & Engels did not believe that human history featured a continuous growth of the productive forces. (wikipedia.org)
  • maintenance
  • As a member of the Astronaut Office Operations Missions Development group, Thornton was responsible for developing crew procedures and techniques for deployable payloads, and for maintenance of crew conditions in flight. (wikipedia.org)
  • nature
  • First of all: insofar as it views cosmos, humans, and nature as being reigned over and guided by powers and forces from beyond, astrology is religion. (msu.edu)
  • systems
  • A conventional assumption is that there are physiological illusions that occur naturally and cognitive illusions that can be demonstrated by specific visual tricks that say something more basic about how human perceptual systems work. (wikipedia.org)
  • society
  • Known for her work in statistical thermodynamics, solid state NMR and chemical education, she is a fellow of the American Physical Society, the American Association for the Advancement of Science, and the Massachusetts Academy of Sciences. (wikipedia.org)
  • free
  • The Act was not effectively enforced, and did not address the working conditions of 'free children' (children working in mills who were not apprentices) who rapidly came to heavily outnumber the apprentices. (wikipedia.org)
  • The enclosed conditions (to reduce the frequency of thread breakage, cotton mills were usually very warm and as draught-free as possible) and close contact within mills and factories allowed contagious diseases such as typhus and smallpox to spread rapidly. (wikipedia.org)
  • areas
  • In short, audio illusions highlight areas where the human ear and brain, as organic, makeshift tools, differ from perfect audio receptors (for better or for worse). (wikipedia.org)
  • either
  • If either of these two conditions are not met, the employment is disallowed and the inmate will be sent out on public service work assignments until approved employment is obtained. (wikipedia.org)
  • people
  • Indeed, Marx sees the essence of what he calls "the capital relation" as being summarised by the circumstance that "capital buys labour", i.e. the power of property ownership to command human energy and labour-time, and thus of inanimate "things" to exert an autonomous power over people. (wikipedia.org)
  • often
  • Typhoid (like cholera, which did not reach Europe until after the Napoleonic wars) is spread not by poor working conditions but by poor sanitation, but sanitation in mills and the settlements round them often was poor. (wikipedia.org)