• PD™ C&B Zinc Phosphate cement is designed for the final cementation of crown and bridge restorations and is refined to provide enhanced physical properties. (pd-dental.com)
  • A soil test can help determine the amount of phosphate in your existing soil. (ehow.com)
  • Yes or No, The amount of phosphate needed or available for a purpose, including estimates of phosphate in and phosphate out, and the phosphate form, determine the phosphate budget for a cell or an entire organism. (wikiversity.org)
  • Through tests it appears that the manganese phosphate coating is the most effective application, the reason being the number of larger pits formed by manganese phosphate and the greater amount of phosphate retained in these pits. (sae.org)
  • The amount of phosphate in animal manure was 7 percent lower in 2003 than in the preceding year. (cbs.nl)
  • The amount of phosphate fell by nearly 40 percent in the same period, from 259 to 159 million kilograms. (cbs.nl)
  • d ) Corollary to the foregoing, it is necessary (1) to establish an accurately reproducible method for determining the amount of phosphate on a zinc surface, and (2) to correlate the amount (weight) of phosphate coating with differences in the above properties. (astm.org)
  • Glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PD) deficiency is a condition in which red blood cells break down when the body is exposed to certain drugs or the stress of infection. (medlineplus.gov)
  • G6PD deficiency occurs when a person is missing or does not have enough of an enzyme called glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase. (medlineplus.gov)
  • Nkhoma ET, Poole C, Vannappagari V, Hall SA, Beutler E. The global prevalence of glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase deficiency: a systematic review and meta-analysis. (medscape.com)
  • African glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase alleles associated with protection from severe malaria in heterozygous females in Tanzania. (medscape.com)
  • Beutler E. Glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase deficiency: a historical perspective. (medscape.com)
  • Glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase deficiency and malaria: cytochemical detection of heterozygous G6PD deficiency in women. (medscape.com)
  • Beutler E, Westwood B, Prchal JT, Vaca G, Bartsocas CS, Baronciani L. New glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase mutations from various ethnic groups. (medscape.com)
  • Isa HM, Mohamed MS, Mohamed AM, Abdulla A, Abdulla F. Neonatal indirect hyperbilirubinemia and glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase deficiency. (medscape.com)
  • Luzzatto L, Nannelli C, Notaro R. Glucose-6-Phosphate Dehydrogenase Deficiency. (medscape.com)
  • Comparison of detection of glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase deficiency using fluorescent spot test, enzyme assay and molecular method for prediction of severe neonatal hyperbilirubinaemia. (medscape.com)
  • Yang Y, Li Z, Nan P, Zhang X. Drug-induced glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase deficiency-related hemolysis risk assessment. (medscape.com)
  • Manganelli G, Masullo U, Passarelli S, Filosa S. Glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase deficiency: disadvantages and possible benefits. (medscape.com)
  • Kaplan M, Hammerman C, Vreman HJ, Stevenson DK, Beutler E. Acute hemolysis and severe neonatal hyperbilirubinemia in glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase-deficient heterozygotes. (medscape.com)
  • Anaesthetic management in patients with glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase deficiency undergoing neurosurgical procedures. (medscape.com)
  • Kaplan M, Hammerman C. Glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase deficiency: a hidden risk for kernicterus. (medscape.com)
  • Glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase deficiency and risk of diabetes: a systematic review and meta-analysis. (medscape.com)
  • Valaes T, Drummond GS, Kappas A. Control of hyperbilirubinemia in glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase-deficient newborns using an inhibitor of bilirubin production, Sn-mesoporphyrin. (medscape.com)
  • Ozbay Hosnut F, Ozcay F, Selda Bayrakci U, Avci Z, Ozbek N. Etiology of hemolysis in two patients with hepatitis A infection: glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase deficiency or autoimmune hemolytic anemia. (medscape.com)
  • The benefits provided by phosphate coatings in reducing wear are ascribed to the controlled etching of the surface subjected to wear. (sae.org)
  • Chemical reactions involved in the production of these coatings are reviewed together with a comparison of the reactions involved in some of the common phosphate coating baths. (sae.org)
  • Cavanagh, W., "How Do Phosphate Coatings Reduce Wear on Moving Parts," SAE Technical Paper 670041, 1967, https://doi.org/10.4271/670041 . (sae.org)
  • Section E, on phosphate treatments, of Subcommittee V of ASTM Committee B-8, on Electrodeposited Metallic Coatings was organized for "the general purpose of studying phosphate coatings on zinc plate and suggesting means of evaluation. (astm.org)
  • discovered (1936) the activated intermediate, glucose 1-phosphate (phosphate bound to a specific carbon atom on the glucose molecule), known as the "Cori ester. (britannica.com)
  • This fact sheet answers the most frequently asked health questions (FAQs) about phosphate ester flame retardants. (cdc.gov)
  • The general population is primarily exposed to phosphate ester flame retardants by eating contaminated food. (cdc.gov)
  • What are phosphate ester flame retardants? (cdc.gov)
  • Phosphate ester flame retardants are human-made chemicals that are typically liquids at room temperature, although some are solids. (cdc.gov)
  • What happens to phosphate ester flame retardants when they enter the environment? (cdc.gov)
  • How might I be exposed to phosphate ester flame retardants? (cdc.gov)
  • How can phosphate ester flame retardants affect my health? (cdc.gov)
  • How likely are phosphate ester flame retardants to cause cancer? (cdc.gov)
  • There is not enough information available to determine with certainty whether or not phosphate ester flame retardants produce cancer in humans. (cdc.gov)
  • No studies have been conducted to examine the toxicity of phosphate ester flame retardants in children. (cdc.gov)
  • Avoid food that is high in phosphate ester content. (cdc.gov)
  • Is there a medical test to show whether I've been exposed to phosphate ester flame retardants? (cdc.gov)
  • Phosphate ester flame retardants can be measured in blood and urine. (cdc.gov)
  • Phosphate ester flame retardants are human-made chemicals added to consumer and industrial products for the purpose of reducing flammability. (cdc.gov)
  • Phosphate ester flame retardants are composed of a group of chemicals with similar properties but slightly different structures. (cdc.gov)
  • Phosphate ester flame retardants are released to the environment from industrial sources and disposal of consumer products containing flame retardants. (cdc.gov)
  • Phosphate ester flame retardants can change chemical composition in the environment. (cdc.gov)
  • Most foods have been found to contain trace amounts of phosphate ester flame retardants due to their wide use in plastics and presence in the environment. (cdc.gov)
  • Indoor air can contain phosphate ester flame retardants from certain plastics, adhesives, foams, or electronics. (cdc.gov)
  • Young children may be at a higher risk of exposure since they are more likely to put phosphate ester flame retardant treated materials in their mouths. (cdc.gov)
  • Currently, we do not know much about phosphate ester flame retardants and the body. (cdc.gov)
  • There is no information on how these chemicals leave your body, but based on studies in animals, phosphate ester flame retardants may be broken down in the body and the breakdown product may be eliminated in the urine. (cdc.gov)
  • Neither phosphate ester flame retardants nor their breakdown products seemed to accumulate in the body based on studies in animals. (cdc.gov)
  • Avoid installation or use of materials that are known to contain phosphate esters-based flame retardants in indoor environments to minimize exposure via air. (cdc.gov)
  • Phosphate esters are added to consumer and industrial products in order to reduce flammability. (cdc.gov)
  • Some phosphate esters will deposit on wet and dry surfaces and others will be broken down by water. (cdc.gov)
  • Most foods contain small amounts of phosphate esters and you may be exposed by eating contaminated food. (cdc.gov)
  • Drinking water may contain phosphate esters due to leakage from plastics or industrial waste water discharge. (cdc.gov)
  • The Department of Health and Human Services (DHHS) and the EPA have not classified the carcinogenic potential of the phosphate esters. (cdc.gov)
  • Generally, most phosphate esters are poorly soluble in water and adsorb strongly to soils. (cdc.gov)
  • Ingesting food contaminated with phosphate esters is the primary source of exposure. (cdc.gov)
  • Hydraulic fluid is the primary source of phosphate esters in outdoor air. (cdc.gov)
  • Drinking water contaminated with phosphate esters due to leaching from plastics or industrial waste water discharge is another potential exposure route. (cdc.gov)
  • Hydraulic fluid spills or industrial waste water used for agriculture can result in the presence of phosphate esters in soil. (cdc.gov)
  • BEIJING -(MarketWatch)- Sinofert Holdings Ltd. (0297.HK) is looking for potash and phosphate mining assets in and outside China, China Daily said in a report. (marketwatch.com)
  • It's the fourth-largest phosphate producer in North America. (yahoo.com)
  • The global hydroxypropyl distarch phosphate market is divided into seven regions, namely North America, Latin America, Asia Pacific excluding Japan (APEJ), Western Europe, Eastern Europe, Japan and the Middle East and Africa (MEA). (openpr.com)
  • Europe followed by North America is estimated to hold a relatively major share of hydroxypropyl distarch phosphate market. (openpr.com)
  • The mitochondrial enzyme encoded by this gene catalyzes synthesis of carbamoyl phosphate from ammonia and bicarbonate. (nih.gov)
  • Ammonia is another key input for phosphate production. (yahoo.com)
  • and adrenal and ovarian lesions caused by tricresyl phosphate (TCP). (cdc.gov)
  • INTERNATIONAL PROGRAMME ON CHEMICAL SAFETY ENVIRONMENTAL HEALTH CRITERIA 110 TRICRESYL PHOSPHATE This report contains the collective views of an international group of experts and does not necessarily represent the decisions or the stated policy of the United Nations Environment Programme, the International Labour Organisation, or the World Health Organization. (inchem.org)
  • WHO Library Cataloguing in Publication Data Tricresyl phosphate. (inchem.org)
  • ENVIRONMENTAL HEALTH CRITERIA FOR TRICRESYL PHOSPHATE A WHO Task Group meeting on Environmental Health Criteria for Tricresyl Phosphate was held at the British Industrial Biological Research Association (BIBRA), Carshalton, United Kingdom, from 9 to 13 October 1989. (inchem.org)
  • The Task Group reviewed and revised the draft criteria document and made an evaluation of the risks for human health and the environment from exposure to tricresyl phosphate. (inchem.org)
  • Foods high in phosphate include dairy products, whole grain cereals, nuts, and certain meats. (medlineplus.gov)
  • Herold, A., Walker, D.A. (1979) Transport across chloroplast envelopes - the role of phosphate. (springer.com)
  • We began these studies to determine the role of phosphate transporters in signaling phosphate starvation. (genetics.org)
  • About half the reduction in the amounts of nitrogen and phosphate was the consequence of the fowl pest outbreak in 2003. (cbs.nl)
  • Because of the fowl pest, no figures are yet available on regional nitrogen and phosphate production in 2003. (cbs.nl)
  • Figures for 2002 show that compared with 2001, the nitrogen and phosphate production dropped most sharply (by 10 percent) in North Brabant and Limburg, provinces with a lot of intensive livestock farming. (cbs.nl)
  • Arginine and glycine form guanidinoacetate in the kidneys, whereas creatine phosphate synthesis is completed in the liver by the addition of S-adenosylmethionine. (reference.com)
  • The kidneys of patients with CKD cannot efficiently get rid of wastes such as excess phosphate in the blood. (eurekalert.org)
  • As a result, the kidneys become overloaded with phosphate. (eurekalert.org)
  • Carmine Zoccali, MD (CNR-IBIM, Clinical Epidemiology and Physiopathology of Renal Diseases and Hypertension of Reggio Calabria, Italy) and his colleagues wondered how this phosphate overload affects the kidneys of patients with CKD. (eurekalert.org)
  • Minerals availability commodity directory on phosphate. (cdc.gov)
  • This Bureau of Mines Information Circular on phosphate is one of a series of minerals availability commodity directories. (cdc.gov)
  • The field of this invention is preparation of calcium phosphate minerals for physiological applications. (google.com)
  • Pyridoxal 5'-phosphate-dependent epilepsy is caused by changes or mutations in the PNPO gene and is inherited in an autosomal recessive manner. (nih.gov)
  • Some plants, especially grassy species, tend to develop reddish leaves when soils develop severe phosphate deficiencies. (ehow.com)
  • By 12 weeks, FGF23 levels were further increased with moderate phosphate restriction, while severe phosphate restriction led to severe bone mineralization defects and decreased FGF23 production in bone. (mendeley.com)
  • Severe phosphate restriction increased 1,25(OH)(2)D levels in CKD mice by 8 weeks and lowered renal Cyp24α1 gene expression despite persistently elevated serum FGF23. (mendeley.com)
  • Renal klotho gene expression declined in CKD mice on a control diet, but improved with severe phosphate restriction. (mendeley.com)
  • The agents bind to dietary phosphate in the gastrointestinal tract. (medscape.com)
  • When it is taken with meals, dietary phosphate is adsorbed in the gastrointestinal tract and eliminated in the feces. (medscape.com)
  • The main crystallographic data for monophosphate-diphosphates are presented in Table 5.1, and those for mixed-anion phosphates containing anions with higher degrees of condensation are given in Table 5.2. (springer.com)
  • On May 1 the government of the Saharawi Arab Democratic Republic (the SADR) and the Saharawi national liberation movement, the Polisario Front, obtained a civil court order to detain a cargo of phosphate mineral rock transiting through South Africa, illegally exported from occupied Western Sahara in April. (scoop.co.nz)
  • Yes or No, Triplite is a rare fluoro-hydroxide phosphate mineral that forms in phosphate rich granitic pegmatites and high temperature hydrothermal veins. (wikiversity.org)
  • North Brabant remained the province with the highest mineral production per hectare: 314 kg of nitrogen and 159 kg of phosphate. (cbs.nl)
  • CPG, which employs more than 30,000 people, produced 4.15 million tonnes of phosphate last year versus 3.3 million tonnes in 2016, its data showed. (reuters.com)
  • Other triaryl phosphates have been known to enter aquatic environments through volatilization and leaching from plastics, through hydraulic fluid leakages, and, to a lesser degree, through manufacturing processes. (wikipedia.org)