• If you work in an industry that uses phenol, please read chemical labels and the accompanying Safety Data Sheet for hazard information. (cdc.gov)
  • A recent in silico comparison of the gas phase acidities of the vinylogues of phenol and cyclohexanol in conformations that allow for or exclude resonance stabilization leads to the inference that about ​ 1 ⁄ 3 of the increased acidity of phenol is attributable to inductive effects, with resonance accounting for the remaining difference. (wikipedia.org)
  • Many people date the beginning of the modern plastics industry to 1907, when Leo Hendrik Baekeland , a Belgian-born American chemist, applied for a patent on a phenol-formaldehyde thermoset that eventually became known by the trademarked name Bakelite . (britannica.com)
  • In support of the second explanation, the p K a of the enol of acetone in water is 10.9, making it only slightly less acidic than phenol (p K a 10.0). (wikipedia.org)
  • In 1872 the German chemist Adolf von Baeyer condensed trifunctional phenol and difunctional formaldehyde, and in subsequent decades Baeyer's student Werner Kleeberg and other chemists investigated the products, but they failed to pursue the reaction because they were unable to crystallize and characterize the amorphous resinous products. (britannica.com)
  • Two methods are used to make phenol-formaldehyde polymers. (britannica.com)
  • In one, an excess of formaldehyde is reacted with phenol in the presence of a base catalyst in water solution to yield the resole, which is a low-molecular-weight prepolymer with CH 2 OH groups attached to the phenol rings. (britannica.com)
  • The other method involves reacting formaldehyde with an excess of phenol using an acid catalyst to produce prepolymers called novolacs. (britannica.com)
  • Phenol-formaldehyde polymers make excellent wood adhesives for plywood and particleboard because they form chemical bonds with the phenollike lignin component of wood. (britannica.com)
  • Phenol is the active ingredient in some treatments for sore throats, and is found in several lozenges and throat sprays. (angelo.edu)
  • In the United States, Phenol may be used as an active ingredient in OTC drug products. (ewg.org)
  • When used as an active drug ingredient, the established name is Phenol. (ewg.org)
  • It is a measure of the bactericidal activity of a chemical compound in relation to phenol. (wikipedia.org)
  • To calculate phenol coefficient, the concentration of phenol at which the compound kills the test organism in 10 minutes, but not in 5 minutes, is divided by the concentration of the test compound that kills the organism under the same conditions (or, probably more common, dividing the dilution factor at which the tested substance shows activity by the dilution factor at which phenol shows comparable activity). (wikipedia.org)
  • Phenol is an organic compound appreciably soluble in water, with about 84.2 g dissolving in 1000 mL (0.895 M ). Homogeneous mixtures of phenol and water at phenol to water mass ratios of ~2.6 and higher are possible. (wikipedia.org)
  • You may be exposed to phenol if you undergo "chemical peels" to remove skin lesions with phenol-containing products or are treated for chronic pain or spasticity with injections of phenol. (cdc.gov)
  • Injections of phenol have occasionally been used as a means of rapid execution . (newworldencyclopedia.org)
  • Phenol injections were given to thousands of people in concentration camps, especially at Auschwitz-Birkenau. (newworldencyclopedia.org)
  • Ingestion of concentrated phenol can produce internal burns. (cdc.gov)
  • People who had skin exposure to high amounts of phenol had skin burns, liver damage, dark urine, irregular heart beat, and some died. (cdc.gov)
  • Ingestion of high concentrations of phenol has resulted in internal burns and death. (cdc.gov)
  • NIOSHTIC-2 search results on phenol - A searchable database of worker safety and health publications, documents, grant reports, and journal articles supported in whole or in part by NIOSH. (cdc.gov)
  • Some phenols occur naturally in the essential oils of plants. (dictionary.com)
  • Exposure to high concentrations of phenol in the air for several weeks caused paralysis and severe injury to the heart, liver, kidneys, and lungs, and in some cases, death. (cdc.gov)
  • Phenol has caused minor birth defects and low birth weight in animals generally at exposure levels that also were toxic to the pregnant mothers. (cdc.gov)
  • Some phenols are germicidal and are used in formulating disinfectants. (wikipedia.org)
  • The Chick-Martin test was then widely used until replaced by more suitable tests not reliant on phenol and reflecting the conditions in which modern disinfectants are used. (wikipedia.org)
  • The International Agency for Research on Cancer (IARC) and the EPA have determined that phenol is not classifiable as to its carcinogenicity to humans. (cdc.gov)
  • Biomonitoring of urinary environmental phenols and parabens is used to determine their prevalence in humans and the relevance of human exposure in public health. (cdc.gov)