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  • successful phage
  • Isolated from Western advances in antibiotic production in the 1940s, Russian scientists continued to develop already successful phage therapy to treat the wounds of soldiers in field hospitals. (wikipedia.org)
  • Together, the group sought funding from HHMI in its 2010 Science Education Grant application for extending the successful phage lab concept into a year-long, upper-level undergraduate proteomics lab. (wm.edu)
  • membrane
  • The phages are secreted as they are assembled, and once the DNA-V complex is formed all further assembly and secretion steps take place in or at a membrane. (wikipedia.org)
  • These findings reveal that membrane fusion is integral to the most common prokaryotic cell fate, phage lysis, and constitutes an unprecedented topological mechanism for the removal of the last barrier to viral release. (pnas.org)
  • Moreover, membrane fusion in this context appears to be mediated entirely by the phage-encoded spanins in a compartment devoid of ATP. (pnas.org)
  • Thus, the mechanism of membrane fusion can be addressed in a very simple system accessible to the power of phage genetics. (pnas.org)
  • Recently, we have shown that in Gram-negative hosts, phage lysis also requires the disruption of the outer membrane (OM). (pnas.org)
  • capsid
  • The phage particle consists of a head (also known as a capsid), a tail, and tail fibers (see image of virus below). (wikipedia.org)
  • The virus has complex structural symmetry, with a capsid of the phage that is icosahedral with an inner diameter of 55 nm and a tail 19 nm in diameter and 28.5 nm long attached to the capsid. (wikipedia.org)
  • lysis
  • In general, phages cause lysis of the bacterial host to effect release of the progeny virions. (pnas.org)
  • Because endolysin function requires the formation of μm-scale holes by the phage holin, the lysis pathway is seen to require dramatic dynamics on the part of the OM and IM, as well as destruction of the PG. (pnas.org)
  • pathogenic
  • With microbial resistance to antibiotics growing into a major global health crisis, researchers at University of California San Diego School of Medicine, in collaboration with national research institutions and private industry, are leveraging hard-won expertise to exploit a natural viral enemy of pathogenic bacteria, creating North America's first Center for Innovative Phage Applications and Therapeutics (IPATH). (ucsd.edu)
  • antibiotics
  • Phages tend to be more successful than antibiotics where there is a biofilm covered by a polysaccharide layer, which antibiotics typically cannot penetrate. (wikipedia.org)
  • dubious - discuss][verification needed] Phages are currently being used therapeutically to treat bacterial infections that do not respond to conventional antibiotics, particularly in Russia and Georgia. (wikipedia.org)
  • IPATH builds upon what we've learned and will apply rigorous principles that span from bench to bedside to better understand the potential role for phage therapeutics in the treatment of patients with infections that cannot successfully be treated with currently available antibiotics," said Strathdee. (ucsd.edu)
  • There's a lot of exciting work that has to be done to look into the efficacy of phage as a replacement of antibiotics. (thefreedictionary.com)
  • organisms
  • Though from the start there was some sense, especially by Fėlix d'Hėrelle, that phage consisted of individual "organisms", in fact it wasn't until the late 1930s through the 1940s that phage were studied, with rigor, as individuals, e.g., by electron microscopy and single-step growth experiments. (wikipedia.org)
  • Phages comprise the majority of organisms on the planet, and through the recycling of carbon in the oceans may be responsible for up to a quarter of the planet's energy turnover. (psc.edu)
  • infections
  • Phage therapy was immediately recognized by many to be a key way forward for the eradication of bacterial infections. (wikipedia.org)
  • As a result of the development of antibiotic resistance since the 1950s and an advancement of scientific knowledge, there has been renewed interest worldwide in the ability of phage therapy to eradicate bacterial infections and chronic polymicrobial biofilm (including in industrial situations). (wikipedia.org)
  • In the two years since, physicians at UC San Diego Health have treated five other patients with phages for bacterial infections under emergency investigational new drug approval from the Food and Drug Administration (FDA). (ucsd.edu)
  • degradation
  • Moreover, data are provided indicating that spanin-mediated fusion is regulated by the meshwork of the PG, thus coupling fusion to murein degradation by the phage endolysin. (pnas.org)
  • bacterial cell
  • 96). What he discovered was that when, after UV irradiation, two or more "dead" phage entered the same bacterial cell, they often became alive again and produced normal live progeny. (wikipedia.org)
  • The P1 phage has gained research interest because it can be used to transfer DNA from one bacterial cell to another in a process known as transduction. (wikipedia.org)
  • host
  • This phage does not lyse its host, but can secrete many copies of itself throughout the life of the host cell. (wikipedia.org)
  • The SP6 phage in particular attracts attention because of its host. (psc.edu)
  • viral
  • Research in phages is also part of the effort to defeat human viral disease. (psc.edu)
  • therapies
  • In the West, no therapies are currently authorized for use on humans, although phages for killing food poisoning bacteria (Listeria) are now in use. (wikipedia.org)
  • 3 There are worldwide efforts to develop credible phage therapies to control S. (thefreedictionary.com)
  • molecular
  • Phage "organismal" ecology is the most closely aligned of phage ecology disciplines with the classical molecular and molecular genetic analyses of bacteriophage. (wikipedia.org)
  • This somewhat whole-organismal view of phage biology saw its heyday during the 1940s and 1950s, before giving way to much more biochemical, molecular genetic, and molecular biological analyses of phage, as seen during the 1960s and onward. (wikipedia.org)
  • drops
  • With phages, the sheer numbers are almost scary - 10 million populate a milliliter of seawater, about 50 drops. (psc.edu)