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  • Farmers
  • Pesticides are chemical or biological substances that are used by farmers to kill undesirable organisms. (umweltbundesamt.de)
  • Farmers will no longer be allowed to use certain pesticides in areas near schools and daycares thanks to new rules that were announced this week. (naturalnews.com)
  • Farmers can employ a buffer zone around their crop, consisting of empty land or non-crop plants such as evergreen trees to serve as windbreaks and absorb the pesticides, preventing drift into other areas. (wikipedia.org)
  • Pesticides are the agents most frequently used by farmers and students in India to commit suicide. (wikipedia.org)
  • This is sometimes referred to as pesticide trap, or a pesticide treadmill, since farmers progressively pay more for less benefit. (wikipedia.org)
  • least one pesticide
  • Between 2006 and 2008, 4.6 per cent of the more than 13,000 near-surface groundwater measurement points exceeded the limit value for at least one pesticide substance, compared to 5.3 per cent for the previous measurement period (2001-2005). (umweltbundesamt.de)
  • 1996
  • In California, the No. 1 farm state and the one with the best records, there were 590 pesticide-related illnesses at schools from 1996 to 2005, according to figures given to the AP by the state. (commondreams.org)
  • limits
  • While in the U.S. tolerance levels are set that determine upper allowable limits for individual pesticides, there is no legal limit on the number of different pesticides allowed on food. (mercola.com)
  • According to the European Food Safety Authority, around 45% of the food we consume contains pesticide residues, with 1.6% exceeding legal limits. (slowfood.com)
  • The New Zealand Food Safety Authority publishes the maximum limits of pesticide residues for foods produced in New Zealand. (wikipedia.org)
  • Limits that the EPA sets on pesticides before approving them includes a determination of how often the pesticide should be used and how it should be used, in order to protect the public and the environment. (wikipedia.org)
  • common pesticides
  • Research on pregnant women exposed to common pesticides has suggested higher rates of premature birth, and poor neurological development and smaller head circumferences among their babies. (commondreams.org)
  • Some scientists believe that certain common pesticides already exist at levels capable of killing amphibians in California. (wikipedia.org)
  • Ecological
  • This reflects the lag time of ecological processes that has been observed in other domains as well, and is a good reason for the application of strict pesticide approval criteria in Germany. (umweltbundesamt.de)
  • First, it voted in favour of the resolution against the ban of pesticides in ecological focus areas (EFAs), going beyond the very purpose of the EFAs, which are areas dedicated to ecologically beneficial elements. (slowfood.com)
  • Many nations in Africa, Asia, and South America are lacking pesticide standard values for the major human and ecological exposure pathways such as soil, sediment, and water. (wikipedia.org)
  • widespread
  • The widespread use of pesticides, their release into the environment, and the potential for adverse public health effects due to exposure may raise public concern. (wikipedia.org)
  • However, in 1946, people started to resist to the widespread use of pesticides, especially DDT since it harms non-target plants and animals. (wikipedia.org)
  • drift
  • More than a third of those were due to pesticide drift, the figures show. (commondreams.org)
  • The study found that 40 percent of all children sickened by pesticides at school were victims of drift - pesticide carried on the breeze. (commondreams.org)
  • Pesticide drift occurs when pesticides suspended in the air as particles are carried by wind to other areas, potentially contaminating them. (wikipedia.org)
  • Ground spraying produces less pesticide drift than aerial spraying does. (wikipedia.org)
  • Direct contact of sprays of some pesticides (either by drift from nearby applications or accidental or deliberate sprays) may be highly lethal to amphibians. (wikipedia.org)
  • With placement (localised) spraying of broad spectrum pesticides, wind drift must be minimized, and considerable efforts have been made to quantify and control spray drift from hydraulic nozzles. (wikipedia.org)
  • Environmental justice advocates in California, for instance, consider moving up the scale of the discourse on pesticide drift by categorizing it as air pollution in order to receive attention from state environmental protection. (wikipedia.org)
  • conventional
  • One of the most common forms of pesticide application, especially in conventional agriculture, is the use of mechanical sprayers. (wikipedia.org)
  • Pre-emergent pesticide application, in conventional agriculture, attempts to reduce competitive pressure on newly germinated plants by removing undesirable organisms and maximizing the amount of water, soil nutrients, and sunlight available for the crop. (wikipedia.org)
  • California
  • The family of at least one California teenager suspects pesticides caused her death. (commondreams.org)
  • There are no federal laws specifically against spraying near schools, and advocates say California and the seven other states that have laws or policies creating buffer zones around schools to protect them from pesticides don't do enough to enforce them. (commondreams.org)
  • Natural News) Many parents are breathing a sigh of relief as California has now taken a definitive step in protecting their children from pesticides. (naturalnews.com)
  • Researchers in California found that similar deformities in frogs in the U.S. and Canada may have been caused by breakdown products from pesticides whose use is categorized as not posing a threat. (wikipedia.org)
  • Fertilizer
  • 56 percent of the households who have a lawn or a garden utilize fertilizer or pesticide. (wikipedia.org)
  • Sprayers convert a pesticide formulation, often containing a mixture of water (or another liquid chemical carrier, such as fertilizer) and chemical, into droplets, which can be large rain-type drops or tiny almost-invisible particles. (wikipedia.org)
  • illnesses
  • Surveillance of pesticide-related injuries and illnesses is recommended by the American Medical Association, the Council of State and Territorial Epidemiologists (CSTE), the Pew Environmental Health Commission, and the Government Accountability Office. (wikipedia.org)
  • malathion
  • Very occasionally, some pesticides (e.g. malathion) may be sold as technical material (TC - which is mostly AI, but also contains small quantities of, usually non-active, by-products of the manufacturing process). (wikipedia.org)
  • Biopesticides
  • Biopesticides include microbial pesticides and biochemical pesticides. (wikipedia.org)
  • Kluwer Academic, London Formulation Codes from dropdata.org, run by iparc.org.uk, The International Pesticide Application Research Consortium (IPARC), Department of Biology, Imperial College, London Burges, H.D. (ed.) (1998) Formulation of Microbial Biopesticides, beneficial microorganisms, nematodes and seed treatments. (wikipedia.org)
  • applicators
  • According to researchers from the National Institutes of Health (NIH), licensed pesticide applicators who used chlorinated pesticides on more than 100 days in their lifetime were at greater risk of diabetes. (wikipedia.org)
  • Food
  • The "worst" list below is based on data compiled by the U.K.'s Expert Committee on Pesticide Residues in Food (Prif). (mercola.com)
  • Numerous scientific studies have shown that pesticides entering the food chain are one of the main causes of biodiversity loss for avian species such as skylarks, yellowhammers and partridges. (umweltbundesamt.de)
  • A coalition of civil society organizations, including Slow Food, have released an open letter tackling the failure of the EU's pesticide approval system. (slowfood.com)
  • Using a U.S. government database listing average pesticide residues on food, the researchers estimated each participant's pesticide exposure based on their food questionnaires. (mercola.com)
  • People can be exposed to pesticides by a number of different routes including: occupation, in the home, at school and in their food. (wikipedia.org)
  • The third type of poisoning is a long-term low-level exposure, which individuals are exposed to from sources such as pesticide residues in food as well as contact with pesticide residues in the air, water, soil, sediment, food materials, plants and animals. (wikipedia.org)
  • As mentioned before, long-term low-level exposure affects individuals from sources such as pesticide residues in food as well as contact with pesticide residues in the air, water, soil, sediment, food materials, plants and animals. (wikipedia.org)
  • The Pesticide Data Program, a program started by the United States Department of Agriculture is the largest tester of pesticide residues on food sold in the United States. (wikipedia.org)
  • It began in 1991, and since then, has tested more than 60 different types of food for more than 400 different types of pesticides - with samples collected close to the point of consumption. (wikipedia.org)
  • Exposure of the general population to these residues most commonly occurs through consumption of treated food sources, or being in close contact to areas treated with pesticides such as farms or lawns. (wikipedia.org)
  • In Japan, pesticide residues are regulated by the Food Safety Act. (wikipedia.org)