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  • immunization
  • Until adequate supplies become available, it is important to continue the currently recommended practice of deferring the DTP vaccine doses for 18-month-old and 4- to 6-year-old children to assure that the initial three-dose immunization schedule for infants is met. (cdc.gov)
  • Superficial infections and minor acute illnesses such as a mild upper respiratory infection with or without low-grade fever do not contraindicate immunization, particularly if prompt administration of a vaccine is deemed necessary or beneficial. (drugs.com)
  • doses
  • A survey conducted by eight different state health departments of 583 physicians indicated approximately one-third had had difficulties in obtaining DTP vaccine, and approximately one-half were following the current recommendations to defer the DTP doses for 18-month-old and 4- to 6-year-old children. (cdc.gov)
  • Practitioners should not administer partial doses of DTP vaccine in an effort to make the vaccine go further, since the degree of protection afforded by such partial doses is not certain. (cdc.gov)
  • It is important for practitioners to establish recall systems to ensure that children whose doses are deferred are recalled for the DTP vaccine they need once supplies become available. (cdc.gov)
  • Because some children will have their 18-month or 'preschool dose' of DTP vaccine deferred this spring and summer, it may be necessary for day-care centers or school systems to allow provisional enrollment of such children until they can receive the needed doses. (cdc.gov)
  • For children born in 1998, we calculated pertussis reporting rates in both the preepidemic (1998-2008) and outbreak periods (2009-2011), by number and order of DTwP doses given before their first birthday. (jamanetwork.com)
  • Of 58 233 children born in 1998 identified in the QVR, 40 694 (69.9%) received at least 3 doses of any pertussis-containing vaccine during the first year from a Queensland vaccine service provider and were included in the analysis. (jamanetwork.com)
  • infection
  • However, a current or recent infection does not necessarily preclude the use of vaccines, depending on the severity of the patient's symptoms and their etiology. (drugs.com)