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  • multiple myeloma
  • BMT is used to treat other cancers such as neuroblastoma (cancer that arises in immature nerve cells and affects mostly infants and children) and multiple myeloma. (brightkite.com)
  • Similar to other plasma cell dyscrasias that, for example, lead to multiple myeloma, WM is commonly preceded by two clinically asymptomatic but progressively more pre-malignant phases, IgM monoclonal gammopathy of undetermined significance (i.e. (wikipedia.org)
  • It is, however, often associated with other blood disorders, such as multiple myeloma and Waldenström's macroglobulinemia. (wikipedia.org)
  • embryonic stem
  • Stem-cell therapy has become controversial following developments such as the ability of scientists to isolate and culture embryonic stem cells , to create stem cells using somatic cell nuclear transfer and their use of techniques to create induced pluripotent stem cells . (wikipedia.org)
  • In mammals, there are two broad types of stem cells: embryonic stem cells, which are isolated from the inner cell mass of blastocysts, and adult stem cells, which are found in various tissues. (wikipedia.org)
  • Embryonic cell lines and autologous embryonic stem cells generated through somatic cell nuclear transfer or dedifferentiation have also been proposed as promising candidates for future therapies. (wikipedia.org)
  • Research into human embryonic stem cells is controversial, and regulation varies from country to country, with some countries banning it outright. (wikipedia.org)
  • Also known as somatic stem cells (from Greek Σωματικóς, meaning of the body), they can be found in juvenile as well as adult animals and humans, unlike embryonic stem cells. (wikipedia.org)
  • Unlike for embryonic stem cells, the use of human adult stem cells in research and therapy is not considered to be controversial, as they are derived from adult tissue samples rather than human embryos designated for scientific research. (wikipedia.org)
  • tissue
  • Bone marrow is the spongy tissue inside some of your bones, such as your hip and thigh bones. (brightkite.com)
  • Malignant disorder affecting the blood and tissue of the bone marrow, lymph system, and spleen. (brainscape.com)
  • Graft versus Host Disease (GVHD) is a frequent complication of allogeneic bone marrow transplant in which the engrafted donor cells attacks the patient's organs and tissue. (clinicaltrials.gov)
  • Decisions about the most appropriate source of stem cells - which must be matched by tissue type to some degree with the recipient - must be made by each patient in consultation with his or her physician based on available options. (aabb.org)
  • A niche is a subgroup of tissue cells and extracellular substrates that can indefinitely harbor one or more stem cells and control their self-renewal and progeny in vivo [ 3 ]. (hindawi.com)
  • Adipose tissue (lipid cells), which requires extraction by liposuction. (wikipedia.org)
  • In practice, stem cells are identified by whether they can regenerate tissue. (wikipedia.org)
  • The hematopoietic tissue contains cells with long-term and short-term regeneration capacities and committed multipotent, oligopotent, and unipotent progenitors. (wikipedia.org)
  • HSCs constitute 1:10.000 of cells in myeloid tissue. (wikipedia.org)
  • In 1980-82 his group first identified (and provided an in vitro assay for) the human mesenchymal stem cell - the precursor of bone, cartilage, adipose tissue and smooth muscle. (wikipedia.org)
  • The patient's own stored stem cells are then transfused into his/her bloodstream, where they replace destroyed tissue and resume the patient's normal blood cell production. (wikipedia.org)
  • They reside in the connective tissue of nearly every organ, bone marrow and peripheral blood. (wikipedia.org)
  • Replenish new functional cells through spontaneous differentiation into tissue-compatible cells. (wikipedia.org)
  • Muse cells are shown to home into the damage site and spontaneously differentiate into tissue-compatible cells according to the microenvironment to contribute to tissue regeneration when infused into the blood stream. (wikipedia.org)
  • These cells then integrate into the site of injury, replacing damaged tissue, and thus facilitate improved function of the organ or tissue. (wikipedia.org)
  • This drives efforts to develop ways of using a person's own cells to grow, or re-grow cartilage tissue to replace missing or damaged cartilage. (wikipedia.org)
  • These cells are held in place by a small piece of soft tissue from the tibia, called a periosteal flap, which is sutured over the area to serve as a watertight lid. (wikipedia.org)
  • The cells grow in self-organized spheroid matrices which are implanted via injected fluid or inserted tissue matrix. (wikipedia.org)
  • Since they are derived from the mesoderm, they have been shown to differentiate into bone, cartilage, muscle, and adipose tissue. (wikipedia.org)
  • Once these MSCs are ready for re-implanation, they are usually transferred with growth factors to allow for continued cell growth and engraftment to the damaged tissue. (wikipedia.org)
  • At some point, a signal is introduced (either in culture or after transplant to the damaged tissue) for the cells to differentiate into the end tissue (in this discussion, cartilage). (wikipedia.org)
  • radiation
  • More recently non-myeloablative, "mini transplant(microtransplantation)," procedures have been developed that require smaller doses of preparative chemo and radiation. (wikipedia.org)
  • differentiate
  • Stem cells are undifferentiated biological cells that can differentiate into specialized cells and can divide (through mitosis) to produce more stem cells. (wikipedia.org)
  • In a developing embryo, stem cells can differentiate into all the specialized cells-ectoderm, endoderm and mesoderm (see induced pluripotent stem cells)-but also maintain the normal turnover of regenerative organs, such as blood, skin, or intestinal tissues. (wikipedia.org)
  • Potency: the capacity to differentiate into specialized cell types. (wikipedia.org)
  • Potency specifies the differentiation potential (the potential to differentiate into different cell types) of the stem cell. (wikipedia.org)
  • Totipotent (a.k.a. omnipotent) stem cells can differentiate into embryonic and extraembryonic cell types. (wikipedia.org)
  • Pluripotent stem cells are the descendants of totipotent cells and can differentiate into nearly all cells, i.e. cells derived from any of the three germ layers. (wikipedia.org)
  • Oligopotent stem cells can differentiate into only a few cell types, such as lymphoid or myeloid stem cells. (wikipedia.org)
  • Properties of stem cells can be illustrated in vitro, using methods such as clonogenic assays, in which single cells are assessed for their ability to differentiate and self-renew. (wikipedia.org)
  • Stem cells from the bone marrow, which is derived from mesoderm, can differentiate into liver, lung, GI tract and skin, which are derived from endoderm and mesoderm. (wikipedia.org)
  • Most of these cells are CD34+ heme progenitors (destined to differentiate into blood components), while very few are actually MSC's capable of differentiating into bone, cartilage, or muscle. (wikipedia.org)
  • Melphalan
  • A combination of melphalan and dexamethasone has been found effective in those who are ineligible for stem cell transplantation, and a combination of bortezomib and dexamethasone is now in widespread clinical use. (wikipedia.org)
  • immune system
  • Graft failure occurs if your immune system rejects the new stem cells. (brightkite.com)
  • More recent advances have resulted in the use of HSC transplants in the treatment of cancers and other immune system disorders. (wikipedia.org)
  • Possible mechanisms of the successful avoidance of GVHD include donor cell microchimerism, less-toxic cells processed prior to transplantation, and the preservation of host immune system that is capable of resisting the GVH alloresponse. (wikipedia.org)
  • In his early career Dr Moore discovered that all stem cells of the blood and lymphoid system developed in the yolk sac at an early stage of embryo development and migrated via the blood stream to colonize the bone marrow and immune system. (wikipedia.org)
  • acute
  • Giving treosulfan and fludarabine together with a donor bone marrow transplant or a peripheral stem cell transplant may be an effective treatment for acute myeloid leukemia, acute lymphoblastic leukemia, or myelodysplastic syndrome. (clinicaltrials.gov)
  • The study is designed as a Phase III, multi-center randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial investigating the use of etanercept for the treatment of acute, non-infectious pulmonary dysfunction (IPS) occurring after allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplantation (HCT). (clinicaltrials.gov)
  • Study subjects will be offered treatment involving the use of the CliniMACS® Reagent System (Miltenyi Biotec), a CD34+ selection device to remove T-cells from a peripheral blood stem cell transplant in order to decrease the risk of acute and chronic GVHD. (clinicaltrials.gov)
  • The most reliable way to prevent acute and chronic GVHD is to remove T cells from the graft. (clinicaltrials.gov)
  • Another stem-cell therapy called Prochymal , was conditionally approved in Canada in 2012 for the management of acute graft-vs-host disease in children who are unresponsive to steroids. (wikipedia.org)
  • Liver transplantation nowadays is a well accepted treatment option for end-stage liver disease and acute liver failure. (wikipedia.org)
  • Due to a combination of acute stress and chronic fatigue, osteoarthritis directly manifests itself in a wearing away of the articular surface and, in extreme cases, bone can be exposed in the joint. (wikipedia.org)
  • Historically, they have been most commonly divided by the stage of maturation at which the clonal (neoplastic) lymphoid population stopped maturing: Acute lymphoblastic leukemia Chronic lymphocytic leukemia However, the influential WHO Classification (published in 2001) emphasized a greater emphasis on cell lineage. (wikipedia.org)
  • Other types include (with ICD-O code): 9826/3 - Acute lymphoblastic leukemia, mature B-cell type 9833/3 - B-cell prolymphocytic leukemia 9940/3 - Hairy cell leukemia T-cell leukemia describes several different types of lymphoid leukemias which affect T cells. (wikipedia.org)
  • Lymphoid
  • HSCs give rise to both the myeloid and lymphoid lineages of blood cells. (wikipedia.org)
  • Lymphoid cells include T cells, B cells, and natural killer cells. (wikipedia.org)
  • Using the ratio ρ = L / M {\displaystyle \rho =L/M} of lymphoid (L) to myeloid (M) cells in blood as a quantitative marker, the stem cell compartment can be split into three categories of HSC. (wikipedia.org)
  • Balanced (Bala) HSCs repopulate peripheral white blood cells in the same ratio of myeloid to lymphoid cells as seen in unmanipulated mice (on average about 15% myeloid and 85% lymphoid cells, or 3 ≤ ρ ≤ 10). (wikipedia.org)
  • Lymphoid leukemias - also called lymphocytic, lymphogenous, or lymphoblastic leukemias - are a group of leukemias affecting circulating lymphocytes, a type of white blood cells. (wikipedia.org)
  • Most lymphoid leukemias involve a particular subtype of lymphocytes, the B cells. (wikipedia.org)
  • To this end, lymphoid leukemias can also be divided by the type of cells affected: B-cell leukemia T-cell leukemia NK-cell leukemia The most common type of lymphoid leukemia is B-cell chronic lymphocytic leukemia. (wikipedia.org)
  • B-cell leukemia describes several different types of lymphoid leukemia which affect B cells. (wikipedia.org)
  • Aggressive NK-cell leukemia (ANKL) is a lymphoid leukemia that is a deficiency NK cells. (wikipedia.org)
  • Natural killer (NK) cell therapy is used in pediatrics for children with relapsed lymphoid leukemia. (wikipedia.org)
  • One problem when using NK cells in order to fight off lymphoid leukemia is the fact that it is hard to amount enough of them to be effective. (wikipedia.org)