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  • Grains
  • Rather than growing for only one season before harvest, like most grains and annual crops, perennial grains grow year after year. (wikipedia.org)
  • By providing year-round soil coverage and exceptionally large belowground carbon inputs from roots, farmers growing Kernza® and other perennial grains will: sequester more carbon reduce nitrogen and phosphorus contamination of freshwater and marine ecosystems, and reduce weed competition, minimizing tillage and herbicide applications. (wikipedia.org)
  • soil
  • With their roots protected below ground in the soil layer, perennial plants are notably tolerant of wildfire. (wikipedia.org)
  • Perennial plants often have deep, extensive root systems which can hold soil to prevent erosion, capture dissolved nitrogen before it can contaminate ground and surface water, and out-compete weeds (reducing the need for herbicides). (wikipedia.org)
  • Agronomists have argued that increasing the amount of agricultural landscapes covered at any given time with perennial crops is an excellent way to stabilize and improve the soil, and provide wildlife habitat. (wikipedia.org)
  • philosophy
  • In the 20th century universalism was further popularized in the English-speaking world through the neo-Vedanta inspired Traditionalist School, which argues for a metaphysical, single origin of the orthodox religions, and by Aldous Huxley and his book The Perennial Philosophy, which was inspired by neo-Vedanta and the Traditionalist School. (wikipedia.org)
  • The idea of a Perennial philosophy originated with a number of renaissance theologians who were inspired by neo-Platonism and the Theory of Forms. (wikipedia.org)
  • According to the Traditionalist School, the Perennial Philosophy is "absolute Truth and infinite Presence. (wikipedia.org)
  • the basic outline of the Perennial Philosophy found in all the mystic branches of the religions of the world: That there is a Godhead or Ground, which is the unmanifested principle of all manifestation. (wikipedia.org)
  • The Perennial Philosophy is a comparative study of mysticism by the British writer and novelist Aldous Huxley. (wikipedia.org)
  • The Perennial Philosophy was first published in 1945 immediately after the Second World War (and the defeat of National Socialism) by Harper & Brothers in the United States (1946 by Chatto & Windus in the United Kingdom). (wikipedia.org)
  • In the words of poet and anthologist John Robert Colombo: The Perennial Philosophy is essentially an anthology of short passages taken from traditional Eastern texts and the writings of Western mystics, organised by subject and topic, with short connecting commentaries. (wikipedia.org)
  • The Perennial Philosophy was widely reviewed when first published in 1945, with articles appearing in Book Week, Booklist, The Christian Century, Bull VA Kirkus' Bookshop Serv. (wikipedia.org)
  • nutrients
  • Nutrient cycling efficiency: Because perennials more efficiently take up nutrients as a result of their extensive root systems, reduced amounts of nutrients need to be supplemented, lowering production costs while reducing possible excess sources of fertilizer runoff. (wikipedia.org)
  • plants
  • Upon announcement, Vera Blue said: "Perennial is a term for plants that come back year after year, and I like to relate that to memory, feelings and emotions. (wikipedia.org)
  • Perennials, especially small flowering plants, that grow and bloom over the spring and summer, die back every autumn and winter, and then return in the spring from their rootstock, are known as herbaceous perennials. (wikipedia.org)
  • There is also a class of evergreen, or non-herbaceous, perennials, including plants like Bergenia which retain a mantle of leaves throughout the year. (wikipedia.org)
  • The local climate may dictate whether plants are treated as shrubs or perennials. (wikipedia.org)
  • Many perennials produce relatively large seeds, which can have an advantage, with larger seedlings produced after germination that can better compete with other plants. (wikipedia.org)
  • Perennial plants regrow quickly after being harvested, re-establishing a protective cover. (wikipedia.org)
  • seasonal
  • Light interception efficiency: Earlier canopy development and longer green leaf duration increase the seasonal light interception efficiency of perennials, an important factor in plant productivity. (wikipedia.org)
  • Vlei is a foreign example that may or may not mean a perennial body of water, but more often than not refers to a seasonal pond. (wikipedia.org)
  • streams
  • Most frequently the term refers to running water (lotic ecosystems) as in perennial streams and large rivers, but the distinction between perennial and non-perennial water is of equal importance in lentic aquatic ecosystems, those that are associated with relatively still terrestrial waters such as lakes and ponds. (wikipedia.org)
  • survive
  • Perennial sunflowers survive the winter by storing food in underground freezing-tolerant stems called rhizomes. (wikipedia.org)
  • Many perennials have developed specialized features that allow them to survive extreme climatic and environmental conditions. (wikipedia.org)
  • plant
  • The perennial sunflowers being developed as an oilseed crop by modern plant breeders may have tubers, but they will probably not be harvested. (wikipedia.org)
  • A perennial is a plant that lives for more than two years. (wikipedia.org)
  • However, depending on the rigors of local climate, a plant that is a perennial in its native habitat, or in a milder garden, may be treated by a gardener as an annual and planted out every year, from seed, from cuttings or from divisions. (wikipedia.org)
  • Perennial ryegrass staggers is poisoning by peramine, lolitrem B, and other toxins that are contained in perennial ryegrass (Lolium perenne), and produced by the endophyte fungus Neotyphodium lolii which can be present in all parts of the grass plant, but tends to be concentrated in the lower part of the leaf sheaths, the flower stalks and seeds. (wikipedia.org)
  • diets
  • Perennial vegetables are an integral part of many cultural diets around the world, particularly in tropical agriculture. (wikipedia.org)
  • farmers
  • A high-yielding, nutritious, perennial cereal could allow poor farmers around the world to produce food on a plot of land indefinitely. (wikipedia.org)
  • years
  • A perennial stream or perennial river is a stream or river (channel) that has continuous flow in parts of its stream bed all year round during years of normal rainfall. (wikipedia.org)
  • Perennial may also refer to other things lasting throughout a year or throughout multiple years. (wikipedia.org)
  • Simplistically a perennial water body is one that keeps full or flowing throughout the year for all or most years, but in practice there are degrees and kinds of distinction. (wikipedia.org)
  • rivers
  • increasingly frequently even large rivers have lost their perennial status under the burden of the human demand for fresh water for purposes of agriculture, industry or the needs of the populations of large cities. (wikipedia.org)
  • Annual
  • A perennial calendar differs also from a perpetual calendar, which is a tool or reference to compute the weekdays of dates for any given year, or for representing a wide range of annual calendars. (wikipedia.org)
  • Grassland restoration with perennials results in fewer annual weeds and perennial grasses, sown at appropriate densities, can out-compete even perennial weeds once they are established. (wikipedia.org)
  • several
  • Perennial standing (lentic) water is usually called a lake or a pond, but there are several local or dialect English words for such features. (wikipedia.org)
  • Often
  • Often printed in perennial-calendar format also are book blanks for diaries, ledgers and logs, for use in any year. (wikipedia.org)
  • allow
  • Perennials typically grow structures that allow them to adapt to living from one year to the next through a form of vegetative reproduction rather than seeding. (wikipedia.org)
  • lives
  • Infinite Presence is "the perennial religion (religio perennis) that lives within the heart of all intrinsically orthodox religions. (wikipedia.org)
  • calendar
  • The term perennial calendar appeared as early as 1824, in the title of Thomas Ignatius Maria Forster's Perennial calendar and companion to the almanack. (wikipedia.org)
  • A goal of modern calendar reform has been to achieve universal acceptance of a perennial calendar, with dates fixed always on the same weekdays, so the same calendar table serves year after year. (wikipedia.org)
  • Advantages claimed for a perennial over an annualized calendar like the Gregorian are simplicity and regularity. (wikipedia.org)
  • Europe
  • Perennial vegetables fell out of favor in most of Europe, and other western influenced cultures, once industrial agriculture gained a foothold. (wikipedia.org)
  • spread
  • While perennial Oryza rufipogon spreads vegetatively by above-ground stems (stolons), O. longistaminata, O. officinalis, australiensis, O. rhizomatis spread by underground stems (rhizomes). (wikipedia.org)