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  • utilization
  • One possible explanation for this relationship that has not received much attention in the literature is that health care utilization may differ by religious involvement or religious denomination. (isharonline.org)
  • Findings revealed the importance of husbands and mothers-in-law as decision makers regarding health care utilization. (springer.com)
  • Maternal care utilization was influenced by social, economic and cultural factors in rural Pakistani communities. (springer.com)
  • Healthcare Technology Management (sometimes referred to as clinical engineering, clinical engineering management, clinical technology management, healthcare technology management, medical equipment management, biomedical maintenance, biomedical equipment management, and biomedical engineering) is a term for the professionals who manage operations, analyze and improve utilization and safety, and support servicing healthcare technology. (wikipedia.org)
  • Regardless of the various titles, these professionals offer services within and outside of healthcare settings to enhance the safety, utilization, and performance on medical devices, applications, and systems. (wikipedia.org)
  • diagnosis
  • The aim of the study was to examine late diagnoses and to assess the quality of care following diagnosis. (isharonline.org)
  • METHODS: National surveillance and cohort data were used to examine late HIV diagnoses and to assess the quality of care received in the 12 months following HIV diagnosis. (isharonline.org)
  • Outcome variables included being retained in care and achieving virological suppression, 366-730 days after diagnosis. (biomedsearch.com)
  • RESULTS: Of the 1781 patients in the study, 503 (28.2%) were retained in care in the Ryan White system and 418 (23.5%) achieved virological suppression 366-730 days after diagnosis. (biomedsearch.com)
  • This is a collective health problem due not only to the high incidence of the disease but also to the delay in diagnosing it, once the diagnosis and early treatment of TB are essential factors in its control. (scielo.br)
  • In this perspective, the time the user waits from the appearance of the first symptoms to the search for primary healthcare service is a determining factor for the delay of the TB diagnosis. (scielo.br)
  • Having the ability to look at a patient on an individual basis will allow for a more accurate diagnosis and specific treatment plan. (wikipedia.org)
  • This screening measure performed by HCT's can help create awareness and assist in the diagnosis and prevention of patient depression. (wikipedia.org)
  • HTM includes the business processes used in interaction and oversight of the technology involved in the diagnosis, treatment, and monitoring of patients. (wikipedia.org)
  • 2002
  • In 2002, the Society for Simulation in Healthcare (SSH) was formed to become a leader in international interprofessional advances the application of medical simulation in healthcare The need for a "uniform mechanism to educate, evaluate, and certify simulation instructors for the health care profession" was recognized by McGaghie et al. (wikipedia.org)
  • Hospital
  • METHODS: Hospital utilisation at small area level was modelled against a wide range of potential health and socioeconomic factors. (isharonline.org)
  • Special glucose meters for multi-patient hospital use are now used. (wikipedia.org)
  • Healthcare technicians provide a key role in patient care and cleanliness of hospital units. (wikipedia.org)
  • The Kingston General Hospital (KGH) is an acute-care teaching hospital affiliated with Queen's University located in Kingston, Ontario. (wikipedia.org)
  • Along with Hotel Dieu Hospital and Providence Care, the hospital is a partner within Kingston's university hospitals in the Southeast LHIN, delivering health care, conducting research and training health care professionals. (wikipedia.org)
  • In 1838 the hospital briefly housed its first patients, twenty wounded Americans taken prisoner in the Battle of the Windmill during the Rebellion of 1837. (wikipedia.org)
  • The hospital recognized the importance of isolating patients with infectious disease when the Nickle Wing was built. (wikipedia.org)
  • Then, in view of the increasing number of maternity patients and their particular needs, the hospital board proposed a new building for women. (wikipedia.org)
  • Although the hospital continued to serve as a charitable institution, an increasing number of paying patients reflected the growing acceptance of the hospital by community members who traditionally received health care at home. (wikipedia.org)
  • In the case of hospital work, the term medical physicist is the title of a specific healthcare profession, usually working within a hospital. (wikipedia.org)
  • Paris Medicine is a term defining the series of changes to the hospital and care received with a hospital that occurred during the period of the French Revolution. (wikipedia.org)
  • These early hospital-like institutions were deeply religions spaces, closely linked to the church, and their main focus was general care for the poor - food and shelter - along with spiritual treatment. (wikipedia.org)
  • The Saltpêtrière became famous, especially for its patient population of mostly prostitutes, and also for becoming the largest hospital in the world by 1789. (wikipedia.org)
  • At this point in time hospital medicine was still fundamentally spiritual institutions, focused on nursing, general and spiritual care. (wikipedia.org)
  • This is in contrast to developing hospital- or physician-centric goals that emphasize the needs of health care organizations and providers. (wikipedia.org)
  • They are a fundamental part of managing, maintaining, and/or designing medical devices, applications, and systems for use in various healthcare settings, from the home and the field to the doctor's office and the hospital. (wikipedia.org)
  • As an emergency hospital the Diabetes-Clinic fulfils the assignment of the state Baden-Wuerttemberg in the treatment of people with diabetes mellitus as in-patients. (wikipedia.org)
  • Annually about 3,700 http://www.bwkg.de/datenbanken/krankenhaus-reha-und-pflegeheimfuehrer/detailsansicht-krankenhausfuehrer.html people with diabetes mellitus are treated in the specialised hospital, especially when the out-patient therapy trials for these people have been exhausted. (wikipedia.org)
  • hospitals
  • The perceived poor quality care at public hospitals was a significant barrier for many women in accessing health services. (springer.com)
  • In North America, hospitals resisted adoption of meter glucose measurements for inpatient diabetes care for over a decade. (wikipedia.org)
  • Medical technician students will complete the following courses: Anatomy/Physiology I & II Clinical Competencies I & II Medical Coding & other various administrative courses Pharmacology Medical Terminology Upon graduation and certification qualification, health technologist will be gainfully employed by: Hospitals, physicians' offices, and specialty clinics. (wikipedia.org)
  • The origins of hospitals, and the care provided within them, is closely linked with the rise of early Christianity. (wikipedia.org)
  • The care provided in these hospitals still focused on spirituality as before. (wikipedia.org)
  • The care provided in these hospitals was dictated by the Daughter's agenda, which was mostly providing spiritual care for the dying as well as alms for the poor. (wikipedia.org)
  • Though hospitals were used to house specific groups of people (orphans, the poor, prostitutes, immigrants), they were also legitimately involved in their care, and were not just another form of penitentiary. (wikipedia.org)
  • Overcrowding created very poor health conditions, which in turn gave these hospitals high mortality rates - nearly 25% at the Hotel Dieu. (wikipedia.org)
  • The best medical care was reserved for only those would could afford it, and the poor population of France's general hospitals very often could not. (wikipedia.org)
  • Equipment control and asset management involves the management of medical devices within a facility and may be supported by automated information systems (e.g., enterprise resource planning (ERP) systems are often found in U.S. hospitals, and the U.S. military health system uses an advanced automated system known as the Defense Medical Logistics Standard Support (DMLSS) suite of applications). (wikipedia.org)
  • Another section specifies that clinics, laboratories, hospitals or other health care facilities which compensate physicians for referral of patients are engaged in fee-splitting, which is unethical. (wikipedia.org)
  • According to their website, the Joint Commission (JCI) have no published view on the issue of fee splitting, and in fact the Joint Commission stopped trying to provide guidance on medical ethics to American hospitals many years ago, preferring to concentrate on less challenging areas of healthcare assessment, despite the vast importance of medical ethics to patient safety. (wikipedia.org)
  • Various health professionals from the hospitals and universities of Greater Boston staff the project. (wikipedia.org)
  • Infectious
  • Because these pathogens do not remain infectious over long distances in a healthcare facility, special air handling and ventilation are not required to prevent droplet transmission. (wikipedia.org)
  • A much-needed addition to the main building and funded by local businessman John Watkins, the Watkins Wing opened in January 1863 to treat patients with infectious diseases. (wikipedia.org)
  • findings
  • CONCLUSIONS: Our findings suggest that headache-clinic chronic tension-type headache patients, in their need of and quest for care, seek and explore both conventional and complementary and alternative therapies, even if only 41.1% of them perceived complementary treatments as effective. (biomedsearch.com)
  • Citations
  • Across Wikipedia encyclopedias in all languages there were 155,000 health articles using 950,000 citations to sources and which collectively received 4.8 billion pageviews in 2013. (wikipedia.org)
  • diabetes
  • Due to this work he is considered the "father of biosensors," especially with respect to the glucose sensing for diabetes patients. (wikipedia.org)
  • Patients with diabetes and their endocrinologists eventually persuaded acceptance. (wikipedia.org)
  • This includes the treatment of patients with complicated diabetes foot ulcers, complex accompanying diseases and secondary complications. (wikipedia.org)
  • Another medical focus is the treatment of disorders in motivation and acceptance as well as the treatment of diabetes mellitus associated with depression and other psychosomatic disorders. (wikipedia.org)
  • Annually about 400 children and adolescents with diabetes mellitus are treated as in-patients. (wikipedia.org)
  • The Diabetes-Academy is a non-profit foundation for diabetes mellitus in matters of science, education (for medical professionals and other professional groups) as well as valuable patient information. (wikipedia.org)
  • Donations help to support measures purposeful which enable a more optimised diabetes care for children and adolescents. (wikipedia.org)
  • facilitate
  • 2003). Generally, HTMS incorporates an extensive suite of clinical instruments including a wireless weight scale, single lead electrocardiogram, hemadynamometer, spirometer, thermometer, (pulse) oximeter, uricometer, and Internet enabled tools to facilitate patient management long-distance by the healthcare team (Rahimpour, 2006). (igi-global.com)
  • Understanding health seeking behaviour in a community is necessary for the development of appropriate health policies, health systems and educational strategies to facilitate access. (springer.com)
  • 2001
  • Crossing the Quality Chasm: A New Health System for the 21st Century is report on health care quality in the United States published by the Institute of Medicine (IOM) on March 1, 2001. (wikipedia.org)
  • nurses
  • A healthcare technician is an allied health professional who provides direct care to patients with or without the supervision of registered nurses. (wikipedia.org)
  • Due to lukewarm interest at first, doctors, nurses and healthcare workers volunteered for the study to set an example for patients. (wikipedia.org)
  • The Framingham Heart Study, along with other important large studies, e.g., the Seven Countries Study, Nurses' Health Study, also showed the importance of healthy diet, not being overweight or obese, and regular exercise in maintaining good health, and that there are differences in cardiovascular risk between men and women. (wikipedia.org)
  • provide
  • Writing competitions may provide a tool for experience-based assessment of health care systems. (biomedcentral.com)
  • While the tailoring of treatment to patients dates back at least to the time of Hippocrates, the term has risen in usage in recent years given the growth of new diagnostic and informatics approaches that provide understanding of the molecular basis of disease, particularly genomics. (wikipedia.org)
  • Therefore, sequencing RNA can provide a broader understanding of a person's state of health. (wikipedia.org)
  • Healthcare technicians provide two levels of care, direct and indirect. (wikipedia.org)
  • These duties include: Cleaning of duty specific equipment Use of atypical equipment Completion of qualification to provide specific care Knowledge based studies to enhance the work environment Most allied health programs are of associate degree levels or state issued certification. (wikipedia.org)
  • Their efforts contributed to funding the Empire Wing in 1914 which was built to provide additional private accommodation for paying patients. (wikipedia.org)
  • These virtual communities provide a real-time resource for obtaining health-related knowledge and counselling. (wikipedia.org)
  • It also includes the staff and systems which provide IT solutions related to health care. (wikipedia.org)
  • Kryptiq was founded largely by former employees of Intel Corporation as well as those from eFusion looking to use their encryption experience and expertise to provide secure email for the health care field. (wikipedia.org)
  • medical procedure
  • Personalized medicine, also termed precision medicine, is a medical procedure that separates patients into different groups-with medical decisions, practices, interventions and/or products being tailored to the individual patient based on their predicted response or risk of disease. (wikipedia.org)
  • barriers
  • If maternal lives are to be saved, policy makers need to develop processes to overcome these barriers and ensure easily accessible high-quality care for women in rural communities. (springer.com)
  • It discusses that the changes recommended in Levels A, B, and C run into barriers caused by these existing environmental factors, which would need to be adjusted in order to redesign the U.S. health care system, but makes few to no concrete recommendations. (wikipedia.org)
  • depression
  • Outcome measures included: general health status (SF-36), presence of PTSD symptoms and anxiety/depression symptoms. (lenus.ie)
  • RESULTS: Asylum seekers were significantly more likely than refugees to report symptoms of PTSD (OR 6.3, 95% CI: 2.2-17.9) and depression/anxiety (OR 5.8, 95% CI: 2.2-15.4), while no significant difference was found in self-reported general health. (lenus.ie)
  • quality
  • In the late 1990s, the IOM established a committee and formal program to study health care quality that lead to the development of To Err Is Human and Crossing the Quality Chasm: the Committee on Quality of Health Care in America and the Program on Quality of Health Care in America. (wikipedia.org)
  • Simultaneously, the National Cancer Policy Board and the President's Advisory Commission on Consumer Protection and Quality in the Health Care Industry published similar reports. (wikipedia.org)
  • Crossing the Quality Chasm identifies and recommends improvements in six dimensions of health care in the U.S.: patient safety, care effectiveness, patient-centeredness, timeliness, care efficiency, and equity. (wikipedia.org)
  • The first recommendation in Crossing the Quality Chasm relates to setting patient-centric goals for improving the U.S. health care system. (wikipedia.org)
  • It proposes making clear, comprehensive, and bold goals for quality improvement and that those goals should focus on improving patient experiences, the cost to each patient, and equity across disparate racial and income populations. (wikipedia.org)
  • Independent assessments have been made of the number and demographics of people who seek health information on Wikipedia, the scope of health information on Wikipedia, and the quality of the information on Wikipedia. (wikipedia.org)