Loading...
  • tend
  • Fine accumulation - mode particles typically have longer atmospheric lifetimes (e.g., days to weeks) than coarse particles, and they tend to be more uniformly dispersed across an urban area or large geographic region, especially in the eastern United States . (encyclopedia.com)
  • Thus elementary particle physicists tend to use machines creating beams of electrons, positrons, protons, and antiprotons, interacting with each other or with the simplest nuclei (e.g., hydrogen or deuterium) at the highest possible energies, generally hundreds of GeV or more. (wikipedia.org)
  • Broadly speaking, bright-colored or translucent particles tend to reflect radiation in all directions and back towards space. (nasa.gov)
  • Salt particles tend to reflect all the sunlight they encounter. (nasa.gov)
  • nano
  • In this special volume on polymer particles, recent trends and developments in the synthesis of nano- to micron-sized polymer particles by radical polymerization (Emulsion, Miniemulsion, Microemulsion, and Dispersion Polymerizations) of vinyl monomers in environmentally friendly heterogeneous aqueous and supercritical carbon dioxide fluid media are reviewed by prominent worldwide researchers. (springer.com)
  • I know what is lattice constant but it has been given that nano particles have reduced lattice constant due to huge fraction of atoms being in surface. (physicsforums.com)
  • How come the lattice constant of nano particles reduced due to high number of atoms present in surface? (physicsforums.com)
  • Bohren
  • Mie theory, also called Lorenz-Mie theory or Lorenz-Mie-Debye theory, is a complete analytical solution of Maxwell's equations for the scattering of electromagnetic radiation by spherical particles (Bohren and Huffman, 1998). (wikipedia.org)
  • physics
  • The treatment of large numbers of particles is the realm of statistical physics . (wikipedia.org)
  • These particles are studied in chemistry , as well as atomic and molecular physics . (wikipedia.org)
  • These particles are studied in particle physics . (wikipedia.org)
  • Because supersymmetric extensions of the standard model of particle physics readily predict a new particle with these properties, this apparent coincidence is known as the "WIMP miracle", and a stable supersymmetric partner has long been a prime WIMP candidate. (wikipedia.org)
  • WIMP-like particles are predicted by R-parity-conserving supersymmetry, a popular type of extension to the standard model of particle physics, although none of the large number of new particles in supersymmetry have been observed. (wikipedia.org)
  • In computational physics, N-body simulations (also called N-particle simulations) are simulations of dynamical systems of particles under the influence of certain conditions, such as being subject to gravity. (wikipedia.org)
  • Monomer
  • Grubb's catalyst was tethered to the silica half of the particle and in solution of monomer would drive a catalytic polymerization. (wikipedia.org)
  • Scattering
  • Lips, A., Hart, P.M. and Evans, I.D. (1992) Use of low angle laser light scattering in characterisation of non-spherical particles and swelling of microgel particles. (springer.com)
  • Maxwell's equations are the basis of theoretical and computational methods describing light scattering, but since exact solutions to Maxwell's equations are only known for selected geometries (such as spherical particle), light scattering by particles is a branch of computational electromagnetics dealing with electromagnetic radiation scattering and absorption by particles. (wikipedia.org)
  • Multiple-scattering effects of light scattering by particles are treated by radiative transfer techniques (see, e.g. atmospheric radiative transfer codes). (wikipedia.org)
  • Scattering from any spherical particles with arbitrary size parameter is explained by the Mie theory. (wikipedia.org)
  • There are several techniques for computing scattering of radiation by particles of arbitrary shape. (wikipedia.org)
  • Ray tracing techniques can be applied to study light scattering by spherical and non-spherical particles under the condition that the size of a particle is much larger than the wavelength of light. (wikipedia.org)
  • measurement
  • Allen, T. (1990) Particle Size Measurement . (springer.com)
  • Once this happens, it becomes impossible to determine, in a subsequent measurement, which of the particle positions correspond to those measured earlier. (wikipedia.org)
  • Prior to the measurement, there is no way to know if particle 1 is in state n 1 {\displaystyle n_{1}} and particle 2 is in state n 2 {\displaystyle n_{2}} , or the other way around because the particles are indistinguishable. (wikipedia.org)
  • Interactions
  • Interactions between the particle and compounds in its environment can create a gradient that moves the particle forward. (knowablemagazine.org)
  • This phase separation can however be arrested by chemically-mediated inter-particle torques or hydrodynamic interactions, which could explain the formation of finite-size clusters. (wikipedia.org)
  • dust
  • Size-selective sampler inlets for inhalable, thoracic, and respirable dust prevent the oversized particles from reaching the sampling filters used to determine the mass concentrations of the overall sample or specific chemical constituents within the sample. (encyclopedia.com)
  • By contrast, most of the coarse fraction particles are emitted directly as particles and result from mechanical disruption such as crushing, grinding, evaporation of sprays, or suspensions of dust from construction and agricultural operations. (encyclopedia.com)
  • tiny particles of dust. (encyclopedia.com)
  • heterogeneous
  • As a result of the fundamentally different chemical compositions and sources of fine and coarse fraction particles, the chemical composition of the sum of these two fractions, PM10, is more heterogeneous than either mode alone. (encyclopedia.com)
  • aerosols
  • Values for most aerosols range from about 0.7 for very absorbing particles to 1 for aerosols that only scatter light. (nasa.gov)
  • However, since aerosols comprise such a broad collection of particles with different properties, the overall effect is anything but simple. (nasa.gov)
  • properties
  • If the properties of the surrounding liquid are tweaked just a bit - if, say, the salt content is higher than normal - then the particles move more slowly, he explains. (knowablemagazine.org)
  • Properties of the various particles listed are also given, as well as the laws that the particles follow. (wikipedia.org)
  • They gradually strip the baseball of most of its properties, by first idealizing it as a rigid smooth sphere , then by neglecting rotation , buoyancy and friction , ultimately reducing the problem to the ballistics of a classical point particle . (wikipedia.org)
  • The first method relies on differences in the intrinsic physical properties of the particles, such as mass, electric charge, and spin. (wikipedia.org)
  • If differences exist, it is possible to distinguish between the particles by measuring the relevant properties. (wikipedia.org)
  • Even if the particles have equivalent physical properties, there remains a second method for distinguishing between particles, which is to track the trajectory of each particle. (wikipedia.org)
  • In the physical sciences, a particle (or corpuscule in older texts) is a small localized object to which can be ascribed several physical or chemical properties such as volume or mass. (wikipedia.org)
  • synthesis
  • Patchy particles are used as a shorthand for modelling anisotropic colloids and proteins and for designing approaches to nanoparticle synthesis. (wikipedia.org)
  • concentrations
  • Today, scientists are perplexed by the discovery that even at very low concentrations these particles kill. (org.in)
  • But things changed dramatically when scientists began to observe incomprehensible but serious health effects even at extremely low concentrations of particles. (org.in)
  • Says Maynard, 'A trickle of epidemiological studies that began in the late 1980s and turned into a flood gate in the 1990s provided evidence that day to day variations in the already low concentrations of particles and other pollutants were still associated with effects on health. (org.in)
  • Diffusiophoresis is a process involving the gradients of electrolyte or non-electrolyte concentrations interacting with charged or neutral particles in solution and with the double layer of any walls or surfaces. (wikipedia.org)
  • collective motion
  • Chemotaxis is a form of collective motion of biological or non-biological particles toward a fuel source or away from a threat, as observed experimentally in enzyme diffusion and also synthetic chemotaxis or phototaxis. (wikipedia.org)
  • contrast
  • Superparamagnetic iron platinum particles (SIPPs) are nanoparticles that have been reported as magnetic resonance imaging contrast agents. (wikipedia.org)
  • quantum
  • Fermion particles are described by Fermi-Dirac statistics and have quantum numbers described by the Pauli exclusion principle . (wikipedia.org)
  • According to quantum theory, the particles do not possess definite positions during the periods between measurements. (wikipedia.org)
  • Main
  • Our main contribution is in controlling the potentially high expense of multiplying the cost of a level set representation of boundaries by the number of particles needed. (springer.com)
  • Active forces would then oppose this phase separation by pulling apart the particles in the cluster, following two main processes. (wikipedia.org)