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  • ovarian cancer
  • What's more, the findings suggest that women with ovarian cancer may have different, more harmful bacteria in their fallopian tubes and ovaries, but much more research is needed to confirm this idea, the researchers said. (livescience.com)
  • Transitional cell carcinoma of the ovary, abbreviated TCC of the ovary, is a rare type of ovarian cancer that has an appearance similar to urothelial carcinoma (also known as transitional cell carcinoma). (wikipedia.org)
  • pelvic
  • Unsure whether I am even in the right website, been searching most of the evening, During a routine annual pelvic ultrasound and during the exam the technican seemed to be searching and searching and finally advised that she needed to perform a sonogram - a bit concerned I asked her the problem and she said she was unable to find my right ovary. (medhelp.org)
  • Pain in the lower abdomen can be because of pelvic infection which can occur in the ovaries or the fallopian tubes. (medhelp.org)
  • organs
  • Gelatin is a derivative of collagen, the most abundant type of matrix proteins in most organs, including the ovary. (researchgate.net)
  • fertility
  • For women who can no longer give birth because of a disease or treatment, 3D printable ovaries could one day restore fertility and boost hormone production. (researchgate.net)
  • Creating an engineered ovary was motivated by the need to restore hormone function and the option of fertility in young girls or women whose ovaries are affected by disease or treatments. (researchgate.net)
  • functional
  • Natural News) A team of all-female scientists have managed to successfully implant a set of functional 3D-printed ovaries in a female mouse, which managed to ovulate, gestate, give birth to, and even nurse healthy pups. (naturalnews.com)
  • The follicular cyst of ovary, or graafian follicle cyst, or follicular cyst is a type of functional simple cyst, and is the most common type of ovarian cyst. (wikipedia.org)
  • ovulate
  • Researchers removed the mice's ovaries and replaced them with 3D printed bioprosthetic ovaries made from gelatin, enabling the mice not only to ovulate, but also give birth to healthy mouse pups. (researchgate.net)
  • bacteria
  • Women's fallopian tubes and ovaries were once thought to be free of bacteria, but a small new study finds that these microorganisms do live naturally in this part of the reproductive tract. (livescience.com)
  • The researchers used genetic sequencing to identify the types of bacteria in the fallopian tubes and ovaries. (livescience.com)
  • The results showed that there were bacteria in this part of the reproductive tract, and that there were different types of bacteria living in the fallopian tubes versus in the ovaries. (livescience.com)
  • Women
  • While most women are not regularly aware of their ovaries, many women do experience pain or discomfort in that area from time to time. (medicalnewstoday.com)
  • In women, fifty percent of testosterone is produced by the ovaries and adrenal glands and released directly into the blood stream. (wikipedia.org)
  • known
  • A half-inferior ovary (also known as "half-superior", "subinferior," or "partially inferior,") is embedded or surrounded by the receptacle. (wikipedia.org)
  • disease
  • Revised 2003 consensus on diagnostic criteria and long-term health risks related to polycystic ovary disease. (springer.com)
  • type
  • Examples of this ovary type include the legumes (beans and peas and their relatives). (wikipedia.org)
  • A pome is a type of fleshy fruit that is often cited as an example, but close inspection of some pomes (such as Pyracantha) will show that it is really a half-inferior ovary. (wikipedia.org)
  • style
  • Longitudinal section of female flower of squash showing pistil (=ovary+style+stigma), ovules, and petals. (wikipedia.org)
  • Above the ovary is the style and the stigma, which is where the pollen lands and germinates to grow down through the style to the ovary, and, for each individual pollen grain , to fertilize one individual ovule. (wikipedia.org)