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  • risk of hip fracture
  • Risk of hip fracture decreased linearly with increasing %BF amongst women but not men. (wiley.com)
  • After adjustment for age, history of fracture, height, smoking, alcohol intake and heel broadband ultrasound attenuation (BUA), the hazard ratio (95% CI) for a 10% higher %BF on risk of hip fracture was 0.56 (0.39-0.79) in women and 0.92 (0.39-2.21) in men. (wiley.com)
  • clinical
  • Less than one sixth of men and one third of women met clinical guidelines for medical evaluation and management after intial osteporotic fracture. (springer.com)
  • Clinical history verifies that patient's fracture occurred in the previous 6 weeks. (clinicaltrials.gov)
  • In addition, clinical risk factors for fracture are at best an indirect assessment of the bone quality. (wikipedia.org)
  • citation needed] All these studies have shown that TBS can be used as a clinical risk factor for osteoporotic fracture since it is reversible (with or without treatment), quantitative and independent of BMD. (wikipedia.org)
  • spine fracture
  • Others consider the procedure only appropriate for those with other health problems making rest possibly detrimental, those with metastatic cancer as the cause of the spine fracture, or those who do not improve with conservative management. (wikipedia.org)
  • intake
  • Gage and colleagues present data that low dietary intake of vitamin K leads to a substantial increase in the risk of fracture and that such dietary restrictions also lead to reduced folate intake, which may increase homocysteine, which also has been associated with osteoporosis. (clotcare.com)
  • mobilisation
  • Early fracture management, rapid mobilisation and active physiotherapy following fracture stabilisation are important to preserve joint function, to prevent joint contractures, to provide muscle strengthening for walking security and to prevent complications due to immobilisation. (springer.com)
  • bone mass
  • This condition often results in bone fractures due to abnormally low bone mass density, and is a leading cause of disability, especially among developed countries with longer average life spans. (wikipedia.org)