• Pelvic organ prolapse occurs when a pelvic organ-such as your bladder-drops (prolapses) from its normal place in your lower belly and pushes against the walls of your vagina. (lmh.org)
  • Many women will have some kind of pelvic organ prolapse. (lmh.org)
  • This is the most common kind of pelvic organ prolapse. (lmh.org)
  • Pelvic organ prolapse is most often linked to strain during childbirth. (lmh.org)
  • Older women are more likely to have pelvic organ prolapse. (lmh.org)
  • How is pelvic organ prolapse diagnosed? (lmh.org)
  • If you still have symptoms, your doctor may have you fitted with a device called a pessary to help with the pain and pressure of pelvic organ prolapse. (lmh.org)
  • Surgery is another treatment option for serious symptoms of pelvic organ prolapse. (lmh.org)
  • Pelvic organ prolapse can come back after surgery. (lmh.org)
  • Pelvic Organ Prolapse: Should I Have Surgery? (lmh.org)
  • Having a baby makes it more likely that you will have pelvic organ prolapse later. (lmh.org)
  • This loss of support is the biggest cause of pelvic organ prolapse. (lmh.org)
  • Having a cesarean section, on the other hand, seems to be less strongly linked to pelvic organ prolapse. (lmh.org)
  • Normally your pelvic organs are kept in place by the muscles and tissues in your lower belly. (lmh.org)
  • Damage or stretching of these tissues allows the organs to move out of their normal positions. (lmh.org)
  • From September 2000 to March 2006, surveillance of 455 patients with multiple organ dysfunction syndrome with unclear cause or clinical suspicion of leptospirosis was performed. (elsevier.com)
  • Feeling pressure from pelvic organs pressing against the vaginal wall. (lmh.org)
  • Decisions about your treatment will be based on which pelvic organs have prolapsed and how bad your symptoms are. (lmh.org)
  • Scientists have taken what may be a key step toward creating human organs such as livers and kidneys. (scientificamerican.com)
  • The problem, explains M.I.T.'s Mohammad Kaazempur-Mofrad, is that although conventional tissue engineering methods provide a scaffold for the cells of the tissue, they do not offer the vascular support necessary to nourish organs such as livers and kidneys. (scientificamerican.com)
  • In parallel with a few dozen labs around the world, Ingber is pushing to develop a full menu of micro-organs-hearts, livers, kidneys, guts, brains, skin. (newyorker.com)
  • Nearly 114,000 Americans are waiting for organs such as lungs, livers, kidneys and hearts, according to the United Network for Organ Sharing (UNOS). (aarp.org)
  • A new technique could more than triple the amount of time livers can be stored before an organ transplant, a study in rats suggests. (livescience.com)
  • However, the researchers did not have to keep the organs constantly suffused with oxygenated fluid - rather, they needed machine perfusion only for brief periods - one hour before supercooling and again three hours after the livers were warmed back up to above freezing temperatures. (livescience.com)
  • CAMBRIDGE, Mass. - Where other people see bacon, biologist Luhan Yang sees lifesaving organs - hundreds and thousands of them, pig livers and pig kidneys and diabetes-curing pancreases, and possibly hearts and lungs, all growing inside droves of pampered swine. (scientificamerican.com)
  • But, the New York Times reports , scientists are working on creating more complex organs such as kidneys and livers with these techniques. (zdnet.com)
  • In another, a group in Japan successfully implanted lab-grown livers made from human cells into mice -- organs that metabolized drugs the way they would in a human. (go.com)
  • That won't happen anytime soon for solid organs like lungs or livers. (yahoo.com)
  • In an interview given to Doug Smock at Design News , during Rapid 2010, Dr. Vladimir Mironov, director of the Advanced Tissue Biofabrication Center at the Medical University of South Carolina, said that one of the long term goals is to print human organs such as kidneys and livers. (tgdaily.com)
  • In other words, although we may be able to harvest a human pancreas from a pig, the pig's other organs - heart, liver, lungs and maybe brain - may also turn out unnervingly "human. (singularityhub.com)
  • But not being able to create the supporting vascular system has proved a major stumbling block preventing scientists from creating large functioning organs such as liver or kidneys. (newscientist.com)
  • Endoscopy refers to the procedure of inserting a long flexible tube via the mouth or the rectum to visualize the digestive tract (for further information, please visit the Colonoscopy and Flexible Sigmoidoscopy articles), whereas ultrasound uses high-frequency sound waves to produce images of the organs and structures inside the body such as ovaries, uterus, liver , gallbladder, pancreas, or aorta . (medicinenet.com)
  • However, if cancer is detected at later stages, the cancer tissues have already penetrated the colon wall and invaded neighboring organs and lymph nodes, or have spread to distant organs such as liver and lungs . (medicinenet.com)
  • Other organs that support the digestive process are the liver , gallbladder, and pancreas. (medicinenet.com)
  • This strategy could, in principle, be used for organs other than the liver, such as kidneys, hearts and lungs, the researchers said. (livescience.com)
  • While hepatitis C causes serious liver disease, the virus can be present in the blood in other organs. (reuters.com)
  • At the height of the cavity is the liver , the body's largest organ. (healthline.com)
  • As part of the digestive system, the gallbladder is a small, pear-shaped organ situated under the right lobe of the liver. (reference.com)
  • The vital organs are the brain, the heart, the lungs, the liver and the kidneys. (reference.com)
  • Although these organs are necessary for survival, people can live with one lung and one kidney and only part of their liver. (reference.com)
  • The liver is the only organ that can completely regenerate. (reference.com)
  • Some average weights of human organs include 1.5 ounces for the bladder, 9.6 ounces for the heart, 47 ounces for a brain and 55 ounces for the liver, accor. (reference.com)
  • Ben's only chance for life meant accepting a liver that was infected with hepatitis, he and dad Duane join The Doctors to discuss the decision to take a diseased organ. (thedoctorstv.com)
  • Possibly the most common organ meat consumed in the U.S., liver was once regarded as a meal for the affluent and was even named one of the Eight Delicacies in The Li-Chi, a handbook of rituals published during China?s Han era. (marksdailyapple.com)
  • In a 23-hour operation involving three different carefully coordinated surgical teams, doctors first removed the stomach, liver, spleen, pancreas, large intestine and small intestine along with the entwined tumor, placed the organs on ice with preservation solution, and then proceeded to extract the tumor while simultaneously preparing the body to receive the reimplanted organs. (cnn.com)
  • The rib cage protects vital internal organs. (healthline.com)
  • The present invention relates to a medical instrument for manipulating internal organs of the body, having a retractor body arranged at the distal end of a rod, guided in a shaft which is provided with a handle at its proximal end and is guided to be axially displaceable in the shaft, to bring the retractor body into either a straight or an open position. (google.co.uk)
  • Angela was born with a birth defect that caused her chest to start caving in on her internal organs. (thedoctorstv.com)
  • The veins squash her internal organs, causing pain and internal bleeding. (nzherald.co.nz)
  • Extending the organ preservation time could allow donor organs to be transplanted into people over a wider region, and give health care teams more time to prepare organ recipients for transplant, the researchers said. (livescience.com)
  • In later research, anthropology Professor Lawrence Cohen documented that one-way trade in the so-called "kidney belt region" of southern India, where he investigated the trade route from organ sellers -- usually poor rural women -- to hospitals and recipients, often wealthy people from Sri Lanka and Bangladesh, or from the Gulf states. (berkeley.edu)
  • For this reason, organ donor recipients have to take drugs that suppress the immune system. (zdnet.com)
  • Dr. Macchiarini has used scaffolds to successfully replace windpipes from cadavers in about a dozen patients who don't have the major problem facing other organ donor recipients: the risk of organ rejection. (zdnet.com)
  • ATLANTA, Georgia (CNN) -- Rabies spread by organs taken from an infected donor has killed three transplant recipients, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention said Thursday. (cnn.com)
  • Two kidney recipients had the organ removed and were undergoing chemotherapy, the hospital said. (go.com)
  • Last year, four Chicago organ transplant recipients got HIV and hepatitis C from a donor who was considered at high risk of carrying the diseases. (go.com)
  • To accomplish this, the artificial organs ought to be micro fabricated with an extracellular matrix (ECM) and different sorts of cells, and recapitulate morphogenesis, cell differentiation, and functions corresponding the local organ. (researchandmarkets.com)
  • This chair has the ambition, to take-on the challenge of helping the patients by developing (bio) artificial organs. (utwente.nl)
  • Artificial: based on new biomaterials and novel designs, to assist or mimic a patient organ. (utwente.nl)
  • The complexity increases from artificial to bioartificial organs, and the engineering and regulatory demands increase further if these organs would be extracorporeal or implantable. (utwente.nl)
  • The chair of (bio) artificial organs addresses several of these challenges by developing an innovative research program, which combines a wide spectrum of disciplines: from molecule to organ. (utwente.nl)
  • Illustration of the disciplines within the chair of (Bio)artificial organs. (utwente.nl)
  • WASHINGTON: Scientists have successfully 3D printed lifelike artificial organ models that mimic the structure, properties and feel of real organs. (indiatimes.com)
  • In the future-we're talking decades down the line-the technology could be used in tissue engineering as well as in creating artificial organs and biomaterials that have no direct analog in nature. (fastcompany.com)
  • In this chapter, the way artificial organs design is currently taught is analyzed and discussed relative to the evolution of the methods of artificial organs design as substitution of physical and metabolic bodily functions. (igi-global.com)
  • As a result, at the forefront of research, the paradigm is shifting from mechanical/electronic prostheses towards the development in vitro of tissue engineered organs/tissues, where the artificial part is fully integrated with the biological counterpart. (igi-global.com)
  • This chapter aims at discussing possible improvements to the way courses on artificial organs design are currently organized in Universities to make them better adapt to the rapid evolution of the methods to design artificial organs and of the needs of healthcare systems, and qualify students to contribute creative innovation in the next decades. (igi-global.com)
  • The future perspectives in the teaching of artificial organs design. (igi-global.com)
  • In this article, the way artificial organs design is currently taught is analyzed and discussed relative to the evolution of the methods of artificial organs design as substitution of physical and metabolic bodily functions. (igi-global.com)
  • This article aims at discussing possible improvements to the way courses on artificial organs design are currently organized in Universities to make them better adapt to the rapid evolution of the methods to design artificial organs and of the needs of healthcare systems, and qualify students to contribute creative innovation in the next decades. (igi-global.com)
  • Scientists have developed a new tissue 'scaffold' technology that could one day enable the engineering of large organs. (bristol.ac.uk)
  • Scientists have built a minute, functioning vascular system - the branching network of blood vessels which supply nutrients and oxygen to tissues - in a significant step towards building whole organs. (newscientist.com)
  • That's why some scientists have been exploring the prospect of using 3-D printing or related technologies to make organs in a matter of days. (technologyreview.com)
  • Scientists are not close to this goal, but they are making steps in the right direction-such as printing accurate models of organ shapes and building passages for blood flow. (technologyreview.com)
  • The task force, composed of transplant surgeons, organ procurement specialists, human rights activists and social scientists, concluded that commercialization of the trade in human body parts was putting powerless and deprived people, especially those in third world countries, at grave risk. (berkeley.edu)
  • Scientists are having preliminary success with a new way to get patients new organs that they may need: bioartificial organs made of plastic and the patient's own cells. (zdnet.com)
  • Scientists are looking to nature to guidance on how to create these bioartificial organs. (zdnet.com)
  • Scientists have identified a new organ in the human body, called 'interstitium. (usatoday.com)
  • A study claims to have discovered a new human organ that could help scientists better understand its impact on diseases such as cancer. (usatoday.com)
  • The scientists then took reproductive tissue samples from each macaque and analyzed the samples for signs of Ebola virus infection, organ and tissue damage, and immune responses. (eurekalert.org)
  • If scientists could find a way to deep-freeze organs and bring them back without incurring damage, we could potentially bank them for weeks or months. (bbc.com)
  • Obviously the devil wanted to trick the scientists to think that blood and organs could have slightly different DNA. (slashdot.org)
  • Aren't people who sell their organs out of desperate financial need acting involuntarily? (slate.com)
  • People who sell their organs and tissues into the marketplace should perhaps be afforded greater priority in the allocation of organs if they become patients in need of organs than people who do not, and the responsibility for ensuring priority allocation should lie with the system. (bmj.com)
  • Such people could never be in a position to receive an expensive organ transplant, but only they would need money badly enough to sell their organs, said the task force. (berkeley.edu)
  • Eventually, we want to be able to replace whole organs with several layers of these constructs. (newscientist.com)
  • Since the first successes with bioengineered skin - which can be used for grafts to treat people with burns, for example - tissue engineers have created lab-grown cartilage, bone and, most recently, whole organs such as bladders . (newscientist.com)
  • Organovo, a small biotech company in San Diego, has found a way to copy human blood vessels and some nerve cells, but the ultimate goal is to recreate whole organs. (kpbs.org)
  • The most basic level of organ design begins with very thin, printed tissue that can be used to create a scaffold, a model of an organ that can't yet function on its own but is more than just a plastic replica. (technologyreview.com)
  • Engineering an organ usually means starting with a scaffold to supply the basic structure. (newscientist.com)
  • After all the cells were gone (in three days), what was left of the organs was the scaffold, the basic shape of the organ, composed of a matrix of proteins and other compounds that keep the right cells in the right places. (zdnet.com)
  • A lab uses them, or cells made from them, to seed onto a scaffold that's shaped like the organ he needs. (yahoo.com)
  • Segev says that hepatitis C-infected organs are clearly marked as such and similar protocols can be developed with HIV-infected organs. (redorbit.com)
  • Right now, she's designing nephrons, the tiny units that make up the kidney: they allow the organ to remove waste from the body and filter blood, among other vital processes. (technologyreview.com)
  • SLUCare transplant surgeon Dr. Chintalapati Varma physically grabs the kidney from the body of living organ donor Robyn Rosenberger during surgery at SSM Health Saint Louis University Hospital in St. Louis on Jan. 17. (newsday.com)
  • In some neighborhoods, the structure of debt appeared to rest on kidney selling, since lenders would advance money knowing the organs were collateral. (berkeley.edu)
  • Usually this is done after death , but sometimes people donate non-essential organs such as kidney s while they are still alive. (everything2.com)
  • Should you ever need a new kidney, a replacement heart or another vital organ, you won't exactly be spoilt for choice. (bbc.com)
  • With tens of thousands of Americans on a waiting list for donations, there is a thriving international black market for organs. (npr.org)
  • This act was passed in order to limit the black market for organs in which the wealthy would have an unfair advantage. (everything2.com)
  • Won't organ selling draw down-and-outs with lower quality organs? (slate.com)
  • And in what is perhaps the most exciting development, transplant centers across the country are testing high-tech devices that "rejuvenate" lower-quality organs that don't meet traditional transplant criteria. (aarp.org)
  • and misplaced enthusiasm that science could soon provide people with an unlimited supply of spare organs. (singularityhub.com)
  • Experts say that the organs from one donor can save or help as many as 50 people. (medlineplus.gov)
  • Instead of discarding the otherwise healthy organs of HIV-infected people when they die, those organs could be available for HIV-positive candidates. (redorbit.com)
  • Segev suggests that, in transitioning to a system where HIV-infected donor organs can be transplanted into HIV-infected patients, doctors can call on the lessons and experience of transplanting hepatitis C patients with organs from people with the same disease. (redorbit.com)
  • The same processes that are in place to protect people from getting an organ with hepatitis C accidentally could be put in place for HIV-infected organs," Segev says. (redorbit.com)
  • At first, he predicts, there would be more HIV-infected organs than people on the waiting list. (redorbit.com)
  • As a result, an average of 18 people die every day while waiting for an organ. (aarp.org)
  • An organ donor can potentially save the lives of eight people, and a tissue donor can help up to fifty people. (healthfinder.gov)
  • It seems only right that people who contribute to the scheme and run the risks entailed in organ supply, however small these risks may be, should also be in a position to benefit from the scheme if they one day require an organ-justice demands no less. (bmj.com)
  • But until recently, experts said it would take decades to genetically alter pig organs to make them work safely in people. (scientificamerican.com)
  • From eGenesis's tiny headquarters in Kendall Square, she intends to use CRISPR to accomplish what the world's largest drug companies failed to despite investing billions of dollars: create "designer pigs" whose organs can be transplanted into people. (scientificamerican.com)
  • People could order an organ and I would make it and send it to them. (newscientist.com)
  • In the United States alone, almost 113,000 people are on organ transplant lists, including more than 1,400 awaiting a new lung. (reuters.com)
  • In one of the most high-profile and best-documented examples of organ trafficking, in June a European Union prosecutor in Kosovo indicted a Turkish and an Israeli national for involvement in an international ring that duped poor people into donating kidneys that were transplanted into wealthy buyers. (yahoo.com)
  • In some parts of India, poor people use their kidneys as collateral for money lenders who have come to expect desperate people to sell their body organs. (berkeley.edu)
  • Research in several countries over the past five years has shown that trading in human organs has developed along class, gender and racial lines, with organs flowing from the poor to the rich, from women to men and from brown- and black-skinned to white-skinned people, said Scheper-Hughes. (berkeley.edu)
  • Cadavers of poor people and executed prisoners have been violated and organs taken without previous consent, raising concerns about the vulnerability of socially disadvantaged individuals, she said. (berkeley.edu)
  • Transplant surgeons and other medical people from at least a dozen countries will report to the Organs Watch center,which will act as a clearing house. (berkeley.edu)
  • Other than that, the first class of objections should simply be attacked by asking, "Are you opposed to compensating people who are generous enough to donate their organs? (marginalrevolution.com)
  • If I was willing to kill people in order to steal from them, there would be hundreds of things to steal that would be easier and more lucrative than selling their organs. (marginalrevolution.com)
  • Normal people are only able to sell a few of their own organs without passing away, of course. (marginalrevolution.com)
  • By acquiring organs from other people by various means. (marginalrevolution.com)
  • since there is a shortage of donated organs, people should start being compensated for their generosity. (marginalrevolution.com)
  • The nation's organ-transplant network is considering giving younger, healthier people preference over older, sicker patients for the best kidneys. (washingtonpost.com)
  • But some worry that the changes could inadvertently skew the pool of available organs by altering the pattern of people making living donations. (washingtonpost.com)
  • These parts cannot be grown overnight, but with people currently waiting months to years for donor organs, there might be a point at which the amount of time taken to grow a replacement is shorter than the wait for a donated one. (go.com)
  • How do I let people know that I want to donate my organs? (everything2.com)
  • Blood banks are so wary that they ask people who have had any organ or tissue transplant to wait 12 months before giving blood. (go.com)
  • The agreement would make it illegal to take organs from people living or dead without their free and full consent, according to the text drafted by members of Europe's top rights body, the Council of Europe. (yahoo.com)
  • Many people choose to donate an organ upon their death. (upmc.com)
  • And if built using a patient's own cells, printable organs could also reduce the risk of transplant rejection. (technologyreview.com)
  • Since this first foray into growing organs, Atala has been one of the many doctors on the forefront of what some say could one day be a new paradigm in medicine -- growing spare parts from a patient's own cells. (go.com)
  • The university is experimenting with various ways to create replacement organs for human implantation, from altering animal parts to building them from scratch with a patient's own cells. (yahoo.com)
  • These issues include the source and manner of organ procurement, as well as the allocation of organs within health systems. (who.int)
  • Hormones are chemical substances that help control certain cells and organs. (healthline.com)
  • In 2000, for example, Mike Taylor and colleagues at Cell and Tissue Systems in Charleston, South Carolina, vitrified 5cm-long segments of rabbit vein , which falls somewhere between cells and organs in terms of complexity, and demonstrated that they retain most of their function after warming. (bbc.com)
  • Despite efforts to increase the donor pool, the demand for organs continues to far outstrip supply. (aarp.org)
  • Looking at this logically, the demand for organs is high. (marginalrevolution.com)
  • But the monopsonist is under pressure to purchase, this pressure resulting from the need for organs: if the purchaser is responsible for supplying patients with organs, and if demand from the public for such provision exists, the purchaser will have an obligation to provide organs and a powerful motive for discharging the obligation. (bmj.com)
  • This will allow us to test the feasibility of this technique in the human organ. (livescience.com)
  • Responding to earlier claims ahead of the final report, the Chinese embassy in London said that its 'government always follows the World Health Organization's guiding principles on human organ transplant, and has strengthened its management on organ transplant in recent years. (forbes.com)
  • Madrid (AFP) - Fourteen European nations signed Wednesday in Spain the first ever international treaty to fight human organ trafficking, a business that generates over one billion dollars in illegal profits worldwide every year. (yahoo.com)
  • Belgium, Britain, Italy and Turkey are among the 14 European nations which signed the treaty at a two-day international conference on human organ trafficking which got underway Wednesday in Santiago de Compostela in northwestern Spain. (yahoo.com)
  • Human organ trafficking is one of the world's top ten illegal money-making activities, generating an estimated $1.2 billion (1.1 billion euros) in illegal profits globally each year, Jagland said. (yahoo.com)
  • Brand New Human Organ Discovered? (thedoctorstv.com)
  • Taking their cue from the body's own vascular system, researchers from M.I.T. and Harvard Medical School constructed a microscopic device capable of supplying oxygen and nutrients to organ cells. (scientificamerican.com)
  • Other methods of extending organ preservation time haven't been practical, the researchers said. (livescience.com)
  • However, keeping organs hooked up to machines for hours or days is not practical for long-term organ preservation, the researchers noted. (livescience.com)
  • In addition, the researchers also used machine-circulated fluids to nourish the organs and keep them alive. (livescience.com)
  • Researchers around the world are making groundbreaking progress in engineering replacement organs. (newscientist.com)
  • Researchers are testing different approaches to salvage infected organs. (reuters.com)
  • The researchers are planning another study combining perfusion with a photodynamic therapy, a type of light they believe could be more effective against the virus than ultraviolet because it can penetrate the organ as well as the solution. (reuters.com)
  • These patient-specific organ models, which include integrated soft sensors, can be used for practice surgeries to improve surgical outcomes in thousands of patients worldwide, researchers said. (indiatimes.com)
  • The researchers then attached soft, 3D printed sensors to the organ models and observed the reaction of the model prostates during compression tests and the application of various surgical tools. (indiatimes.com)
  • In the future, researchers hope to use this new method to 3D print lifelike models of more complicated organs, using multiple inks. (indiatimes.com)
  • The researchers concluded that using collagen-based membranes in organ-on-a-chip devices enhance the growth, viability and barrier function of human colon cells and that the method likely could be extended to cells from other organs. (canadafreepress.com)
  • Atala currently heads up more than 300 researchers in the Wake Forest University lab who are working on growing more than 30 different organs and body tissues. (go.com)
  • By inserting the endoscope into the upper or the lower digestive tract one can obtain high quality ultrasound images of the organs inside the body. (medicinenet.com)
  • The stomach is the primary organ that breaks down food as it enters the digestive system. (reference.com)
  • NEW YORK (CNN) -- Seven-year-old Heather McNamara was heading home Tuesday, a month after surgery that temporarily removed organs from her digestive tract to allow removal of a tennis ball-size tumor. (cnn.com)
  • From skin to blood vessels to solid organs, work is underway to offer more options for patients with faulty or damaged body parts. (go.com)
  • So far, only a few such organs have been created and transplanted, and the they aren't complex organs -- just simples one like bladders and a windpipe. (zdnet.com)
  • Bioartificial: combining biomaterials and biological cells to fully replace failing patient organs. (utwente.nl)
  • It is made up of various organs, cells and proteins. (nih.gov)
  • Should it also be permitted to set the prices of various organs and tissues that it is interested in purchasing? (bmj.com)
  • For example, early stage colon cancer refers to cancer confined to the inner surface of the colon before it is spread to adjacent tissues or distant organs. (medicinenet.com)
  • The early 1900's saw the development of the Theatre Organ, intended to accompany silent films, and towards the end of that century fully electronic organs were capable of mimicking nearly any other instrument in existence. (last.fm)
  • Organs with tabs that serve as stop controls are common in North America, especially with electronic organs. (wikiversity.org)
  • Lighted drawknobs are being utilized, but almost exclusively with low-end electronic organs. (wikiversity.org)
  • We're trying to best utilize the gift of the donated organ,' said Kenneth Andreoni, an associate professor of surgery at Ohio State University who chairs the committee that is reviewing the system for the United Network for Organ Sharing (UNOS), a Richmond-based private nonprofit group contracted by the federal government to coordinate organ allocation. (washingtonpost.com)
  • If you are interested in donating an organ, contact the United Network for Organ Sharing (UNOS) at 1-888-894-6361 or go online at www.unos.org to get more information and to locate the nearest transplant center. (upmc.com)
  • To locate a transplant center near you, ask your doctor or contact the United Network for Organ Sharing by going online at www.unos.org or calling 1-888-894-6361. (upmc.com)
  • What organs are found in the thoracic cavity of humans? (reference.com)
  • A disease that affects sheep maybe can gestate over years in a flock of sheep and then suddenly because they have many human organs its affecting humans too. (slashdot.org)
  • This is the second time in as many years humans have learned details about a new organ. (usatoday.com)
  • Ebola virus can infect the reproductive organs of male and female macaques, according to a study published in The American Journal of Pathology , suggesting that humans could be similarly infected. (eurekalert.org)
  • Growing large organs remains a huge challenge but with this technology we have overcome one of the major hurdles. (bristol.ac.uk)
  • It shows the connection between the rise in organ transplant surgeries and the imprisonment of Falun Gong practitioners by the Chinese Communist Party starting in 1999. (youtube.com)
  • In 1999 in the United States, more than 55,000 individuals were awaiting donor organs, and that number increases daily. (faqs.org)
  • Organ on chip technology aims at creating imitation active organs that mimic the complex and biological reactions of actual organs, keeping in mind the goal to examine drugs' action by exactly manipulating the cells and their microenvironments. (researchandmarkets.com)
  • In the coming years, due to the aging of the population and the low availability of donor organs there will be urgent need for bioengineering solutions to assist, mimic or replace failing patient organs. (utwente.nl)
  • While anti-rejection medication helps your accept the new organ by lowering your body's immune system response, it can also put you at greater risk for fungal infections. (cdc.gov)
  • Rejection happens when your immune system attacks the new organ. (medlineplus.gov)
  • The monopsonist would also have other obligations, such as ensuring correct tissue typing to maximise histocompatibility and so minimise graft rejection, and screening for diseased or otherwise hazardous organs and tissues (for example, blood infected with HIV). (bmj.com)
  • The old problems of infection and rejection of another species' organs seem almost quaint compared to those confronting eGenesis. (scientificamerican.com)
  • The current system, which dates to 1986, was first based largely on giving kidneys to the patients who matched the organs best, but it evolved to take a first-come, first-served approach made possible by safer, more powerful anti-rejection drugs. (washingtonpost.com)
  • Ingber, who works in a modern glass building in downtown Boston and is the founding director of Harvard's Wyss Institute for Biologically Inspired Engineering , has a replacement in mind: organs on chips. (newyorker.com)
  • Dr. Grikscheit's work is at the forefront of efforts in laboratories around the world to build replacement organs and tissues. (nytimes.com)
  • But in most cases, the goal is to swap the bad organ - a windpipe, for example - with the engineered replacement, where it can grow into its permanent position in the body. (nytimes.com)
  • Growing a replacement tissue or organ in the lab eliminates the dependence on waiting for a donor to die. (go.com)
  • Shows a three-dimensional model of the human body organs and a description of all of them. (apple.com)
  • When you have an organ transplant, doctors remove an organ from another person and place it in your body. (medlineplus.gov)
  • If you have a transplant, you must take drugs the rest of your life to help keep your body from rejecting the new organ. (medlineplus.gov)
  • Placing the transducer on the tip of an endoscope allows the transducer to get close to the organs inside the body. (medicinenet.com)
  • Unlike donated organs, those custom-made in this way are not rejected by the body. (newscientist.com)
  • The technique used in Toronto, known as ex vivo lung perfusion, keeps organs "alive" outside the body by pumping them with a bloodless oxygenated liquid. (reuters.com)
  • 30, 2012- From advice about keeping sharp eyes and keen ears, to tips about how to eat well and fight stress, this issue of House Organ is dedicated to keeping the body you live in healthy. (vanderbilt.edu)
  • The eyes are a delicate, important and needy organ in the body and they need just as much care as the other organs in our body. (articlealley.com)
  • At a cultural level, the organs trade points to a "collapse of cultural and religious sanctions against body dismemberment," according to the program's mission statement. (berkeley.edu)
  • Just use his body to recreate his own organ. (zdnet.com)
  • The heart is the organ that keeps blood and its cargo of oxygen and nutrients circulating throughout the body. (reference.com)
  • Dr. Anthony Atala, director of the Wake Forest Institute for Regenerative Medicine in Winston-Salem, N.C., was part of the first group in the world to successfully implant a lab-grown organ into the human body. (go.com)
  • An organ manipulator is described for exposing an organ situated in a body cavity to be investigated or treated. (google.co.uk)
  • Endoscopic operations in the abdominal cavity on the one hand assume that a body cavity is dilated by means of body cavity gas, and on the other hand that there is free access to the organ to be investigated or treated. (google.co.uk)
  • You know what, I'm feeling extremely generous today, can I be an organ and tissue donor and also donate my body to medical science? (everything2.com)
  • Illegal organ trading preys on the desperate and reduces human beings to the price tag that can be attached to their body parts. (yahoo.com)
  • The study suggests an organ called the interstitium is a series of interconnected, fluid-filled compartments throughout the body. (usatoday.com)
  • They currently can (and do) grow (i.e. clone) pigs with human organs (sort of -- they have genetically mutated them so their organs grow without a particular gene that makes the human body reject it -- it effectively sees the organ as a human one). (halfbakery.com)
  • Then, how one woman could actually HEAR her organs working inside her body. (thedoctorstv.com)
  • What you can and can't do will depend on the type of transplant you had, other health problems you have, and how your body reacts to the new organ. (upmc.com)
  • One of the aims surgical research men have devoted a great deal of their energy to for a long time, is directed toward appropriate substitutes for some tubular organs of the human body. (google.ca)
  • The purpose of in-situ printing is to print an organ directly into the human body during surgery. (wikipedia.org)