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  • soup
  • Did you check the nutrition label on that can of soup before you tossed it into your grocery cart? (scripps.org)
  • Products between one and two servings, such as a 20-ounce soda or a 15-ounce soup can, will be labeled as a single serving because that's how much people typically eat in one sitting. (townhall.com)
  • I have seen labels on Sour Patch kids as fat free (which is technically true, but they are filled with sugar), labels on margarine for reducing cholesterol levels, labels on soup for being lower in sodium, and one of my favorites is oreo cookies made with organic flour and sugar, printed in green and yellow letters (for the record, organic does not necessarily equal healthy). (caloriebee.com)
  • calorie
  • The calorie listing will now be much larger than anything else on the label, making it hard to overlook. (townhall.com)
  • They have fought the new rules alongside some companies, including beverage makers who say they are already putting calorie labels on the front of cans and bottles. (townhall.com)
  • FDA's
  • Dr. Peter Lurie, president of the Center for Science in the Public Interest, said the FDA's decision to "cave in to food industry demands" harms public health and creates a confusing marketplace as many companies have already created new labels. (reuters.com)
  • The hollowness of the FDA's decision is underscored by the many updated labels that are already in grocery stores," he said in a statement. (reuters.com)
  • physicians
  • Background: Litigation documents reveal that pharmaceutical companies have paid physicians to promote off-label uses of their products through a number of different avenues. (harvard.edu)
  • type
  • Once you know what type of nutrients you want to limit or get enough of, check the serving size to be sure you know just how much of each item on the label you're actually eating if you consume the entire container. (scripps.org)
  • We assessed disclosures made in articles related to the off-label use in question, determined the frequency of adequate disclosure statements, and analyzed characteristics of the authors (specialty, author position) and articles (type, connection to off-label use, journal impact factor, citation count/year). (harvard.edu)
  • products
  • The new labels should also spur food manufacturers to add less sugar to their products," Michael Jacobson, president of the Center for Science in the Public Interest, an advocacy group. (townhall.com)
  • years
  • The changes were first proposed by the Food and Drug Administration two years ago and are the first major update to the labels since their introduction in 1994. (townhall.com)
  • promote
  • I have seen labels on just cereal that promise to boost your immunity, prevent cancer, reduce cholesterol levels, and promote sex drive. (caloriebee.com)
  • sugar
  • Only 1 percent of participants looked at the total fat, trans fat, sugar and serving size on nearly all the labels - even though 31 percent of participants claimed to do so. (scripps.org)
  • He said it's currently impossible for consumers studying the labels to know how much sugar fits into a reasonable diet. (townhall.com)
  • levels
  • Labels also must now list levels of potassium and Vitamin D, nutrients Americans don't get enough of. (townhall.com)