• To examine the role of the ventral neck muscles in lateral geze shift, the eye and head movements towards a visual target were analyzed in subjects with unilateral neck dissection and normal subjects. (nii.ac.jp)
  • Publications] Suzuki T: 'Function of the Sterno-Cleid-Mastoid muscle(SCM)in the Lateral gaze shiff' Anthovopol Sci. (nii.ac.jp)
  • Publications] Suzuki, T.: 'Function of the sterno-cleid-mastoid muscle (SCM) in the lateral gaze. (nii.ac.jp)
  • Moreover, when the subjects were ordered to continue to maintain their gaze direction towards the imaginary target after the target lamp was off, the patient showed a tendency that their gaze gradually deviated to the nasal direction due solely to unsteadiness of the eye position, probably reflecting a loss of appropriate afferent signals form the neck muscles to the oculomotor center. (nii.ac.jp)
  • Publications] Nakayama, K.: 'Morphology of single primary spindle afferents of the in the intercostal muscles in the cat' J.comp Neurol. (nii.ac.jp)
  • abnormal alignment of one or both eyes, characterized by a turning inwards or outwards from the nose thus preventing parallel vision: caused by paralysis of an eye muscle, etc. (thefreedictionary.com)
  • According to these topographic findings, physicians seeking the pathophysiologic characteristics of presbyopia, which occurs in humans and rhesus monkeys on a comparable relative time scale, should redirect their attention toward the ciliary muscle. (uni-regensburg.de)
  • The aims of this study were to evaluate the correlation of T2 relaxation time to muscle volume based on MR imaging and to investigate whether individual physical relativization of extraocular muscle volume significantly influences results. (medscimonit.com)
  • A neural network model of biophysical neurons in the midbrain is presented to drive a muscle fiber oculomotor plant during horizontal monkey saccades. (hindawi.com)
  • J. D. Enderle and D. A. Sierra, "A new linear muscle fiber model for neural control of saccades," International Journal of Neural Systems , vol. 23, no. 2, 2013. (hindawi.com)
  • This study compares the use of single-dose 5% povidone-iodine drops versus a week-long course of antibiotic/steroid as a prophylaxis against postoperative infection in extraocular muscle surgery. (elsevier.com)
  • The coronal images and MPR reformations revealed initial signs of compression of both the optic nerves due to reduction of the fatty cleavage between the medial straight muscles and the medial portion of the nerve (Fig. 2a, b). (eurorad.org)
  • An extremely rare (six cases in the world literature) X-linked condition (OMIM:314580) condition characterised by malformations of the feet (pes cavus, pes equinovarus, flexed toes), progressive contractures of other joints, progressive distal amyotrophy, oculomotor and facial apraxia, dysarthria, swallowing difficulties and mild mental retardation. (thefreedictionary.com)
  • T2 relaxation times were measured for each muscle, and a standardization algorithm was applied based on T2 relaxation time of ipsilateral frontal lobe white matter. (medscimonit.com)
  • Results: Highest correlation for relative T2 relaxation time and muscle volume was observed for inferior RM (value of r=0.520, which increased to r=0.660 after relativization). (medscimonit.com)
  • However, both optic nerves showed a mild scoliotic appearance and both the medial muscles exhibited an increased thickness because of the retraction of the intraorbital structures after decompression (Fig. 4c). (eurorad.org)
  • strəbĭz`məs) , inability of the eyes to focus together because of an imbalance in the muscles that control eye eye, organ of vision and light perception. (thefreedictionary.com)
  • Neurotrophic factors present a potential alternative treatment approach because of their actions both on muscle and motor neurons that direct eye position and movement. (arvojournals.org)
  • The posterior fixation suture was placed 14 mm behind the superior rectus muscle insertion and the superior rectus muscle was recessed. (biomedsearch.com)
  • With age, the atropinized muscle becomes shorter and smaller in area while it remains unchanged in width and position. (uni-regensburg.de)