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  • Humans
  • To probe the dynamics of 2D motion processing, we recorded in humans the short-latency, initial (open-loop) part of the ocular following responses elicited by different types of drifting plaids. (jneurosci.org)
  • Ophthalmology
  • This is a good rule to follow even if you don't think you have diabetes, Mina Massaro-Giordano, M.D., co-director of the Penn Dry Eye & Ocular Surface Center and a professor of clinical ophthalmology at the University of Pennsylvania, tells SELF. (uweightloss.com)
  • studies
  • Here, we review the existing data-from historical and contemporary studies that have aimed to nullify or minimize eye motion-on the perceptual and physiological consequences of perfect versus imperfect fixation. (royalsocietypublishing.org)
  • evidence
  • and physiological ( Pack and Born, 2001 ) evidence that 2D motion computation is a dynamical process that takes several tens of milliseconds to be accurately completed. (jneurosci.org)
  • motion
  • Type I plaid motion made by summing two orthogonal moving gratings elicited ocular following with identical short latencies. (jneurosci.org)
  • Ocular following was first initiated in the grating motion direction, at ultra-short latency. (jneurosci.org)
  • These results suggest that initial ocular following is underpinned by parallel processing of component- and pattern-related velocities followed by an integrative stage that computes the two-dimensional surface motion. (jneurosci.org)
  • We demonstrate that these two types of motion signals are processed independently, with different latencies, but are combined together so that at the end of the open-loop period of ocular following responses, the 2D tracking direction can be predicted by a vector combination calculation. (jneurosci.org)
  • study
  • Yet, owing to the constant and minute nature of these motions, the study of their perceptual and physiological consequences has met significant technological challenges. (royalsocietypublishing.org)
  • Yet, the study of ocular instability has a long history-starting with Jurin's 1738 observation [ 1 ] that the 'trembling of the eye' is unremitting-but it has proceeded in spurts and starts, and it is only in recent years that it has become a mainstay of oculomotor and visual neuroscience. (royalsocietypublishing.org)