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  • rash
  • Note that this involvement of the tongue is a part of the rash which is characteristic of scarlet fever. (wikipedia.org)
  • sore
  • After an incubation period of 2-4 days, the invading organisms elicit an acute inflammatory response, with 3-5 days of sore throat, fever, malaise, headache, and elevated leukocyte count. (medscape.com)
  • Occasionally, within a few days of developing the sore throat, an individual may develop a fine, rough, sunburn-like rash over the face and upper body, and have a fever of 101-104 ° F (38.3-40 ° C). The tongue becomes bright red, with a flecked, strawberry-like appearance. (encyclopedia.com)
  • The condition may present all of a sudden with high fever, severe sore throat, difficult and painful swallowing, drooling saliva, hoarse voice, difficulty breathing and malaise. (wikipedia.org)
  • recurrent
  • Severe scarring of the valves develops during a period of months to years after an episode of acute rheumatic fever, and recurrent episodes may cause progressive damage to the valves. (medscape.com)
  • A chronic state of recurrent erysipelas infections can occur with several predisposing factors including alcoholism, diabetes, and tinea pedis (athlete's foot). (wikipedia.org)
  • develops
  • The infected person develops a high fever, and possibly a rapid heartbeat when lying down, paleness, shortness of breath, and fluid retention. (encyclopedia.com)
  • inflammatory
  • Within the tonsils, white blood cells of the immune system destroy the viruses or bacteria by producing inflammatory cytokines like phospholipase A2, which also lead to fever. (wikipedia.org)
  • usually
  • Today, ARF remains a rarity in most of the United States, although Hawaii and American Samoa continue to see a significant number of cases, many of which are caused by streptococcal strains not usually associated with rheumatic fever in persons of Polynesian descent. (medscape.com)
  • The fever is usually under 102 F and improves with acetaminophen ( Tylenol ) or ibuprofen ( Advil ). (emedicinehealth.com)
  • Usually occurs as a consequence of rheumatic fever. (bmj.com)
  • Usually with treatment fever resolves within 24 hours and there is a full recovery. (wikipedia.org)
  • Later, during the convalescent or the subacute phase, desquamation of the fingers and toes usually begins in the periungual region within two to three weeks after the onset of fever and may extend to include the palms and soles. (wikipedia.org)
  • group A streptococ
  • This remarkable decline of rheumatic fever likely reflects improved socioeconomic conditions, as well the decline in prevalence of the classically described rheumatogenic strains of group A streptococci. (medscape.com)