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  • Researchers
  • Researchers have linked the rise in obesity to technological progress reducing the opportunity cost of food consumption and increasing the opportunity cost of physical activity. (repec.org)
  • The researchers compared how the three measures estimated obesity rates among nearly 15,000 children aged 11-12 years over three years to see how well they matched each other. (www.nhs.uk)
  • however, a team of researchers from the PATH Foundation in New York studied the medical records of 1,234 patients from 2003 to 2009 to determine both the BMI and percentage of body fat using DEXA. (weightlosssurgerychannel.com)
  • Obesity and the environment aims to look at the different environmental factors that have been determined by researchers to cause and perpetuate obesity. (wikipedia.org)
  • Some researchers have found that genetics increase the likelihood of occurrence of obesity through higher levels of fat deposition and adipokine secretion. (wikipedia.org)
  • However, many researchers accept the results of Flegal's 2005 and 2013 papers and see them as an illustration of what is known as the obesity paradox. (wikipedia.org)
  • Researchers from the NIH's National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases (NIDDK) conducted a study and found that early-onset paternal obesity is connected with an increased risk of liver disease in their kin. (wikipedia.org)
  • measure
  • But as a population measure, it's very good for measuring obesity. (huffingtonpost.ca)
  • Millar agreed that body fat, rather than weight, is a much better measure of someone's overall health, and that electronic devices and not the BMI are better suited to examine that. (huffingtonpost.ca)
  • However, it is not possible to conclude from this study which is the best measure of obesity to use in children, as the study did not relate these different measurements to the chance of experiencing ill health. (www.nhs.uk)
  • However, this observation has been based on studies mainly using BMI as a measure of obesity. (www.nhs.uk)
  • In contrast, the DEXA scan is a direct measure of the percentage of body fat. (weightlosssurgerychannel.com)
  • There are several ways to measure fatness and obesity, each with its own strengths and weaknesses. (repec.org)
  • 2009. "The Timing of the Rise in U.S. Obesity Varies With Measure of Fatness. (repec.org)
  • These measure a common form of obesity known as abdominal or central obesity, characterized by excess deposits of fat in the abdominal region and inside peritoneal cavity. (wikipedia.org)
  • Sagittal abdominal diameter (SAD) is a measure of visceral obesity, the amount of fat in the gut region. (wikipedia.org)
  • Excess
  • Obesity is a medical condition in which excess body fat has accumulated to the extent that it has an adverse effect on health. (wikipedia.org)
  • Levels in excess of 32% for women and 25% for men are generally considered to indicate obesity. (wikipedia.org)
  • Children who grow accustomed to relying on external hunger cues and thus eating more than their bodies need because are more likely to gain excess weight. (wikipedia.org)
  • Minnoch was diagnosed with massive generalized edema, a condition in which the body accumulates excess extracellular fluid. (wikipedia.org)
  • demethylase
  • Following a 2010 speculation of m6A in mRNA being dynamic and reversible, the discovery of the first m6A demethylase, fat mass and obesity-associated protein (FTO) in 2011 confirmed this hypothesis and revitalized the interests in the study of m6A. (wikipedia.org)
  • trends
  • aware of the conse- include an increased urbanization and rising incomes that quences of present trends in NR-CDs (obesity.0001 for each test). (scribd.com)
  • If current trends are to continue, the obesity rate will rise to 29% by 2011. (wikipedia.org)
  • outcomes
  • In those with a BMI under 35, intra-abdominal body fat is related to negative health outcomes independent of total body fat. (wikipedia.org)
  • Insulin resistance, glucose homeostasis, fat oxidation and amino acid synthesis are all disrupted by maternal obesity and contribute to adverse outcomes. (wikipedia.org)
  • SCOPUS
  • Eleftheria Zeggini on Twitter Eleftheria Zeggini's publications indexed by the Scopus bibliographic database, a service provided by Elsevier. (wikipedia.org)
  • favorable
  • As of 2006, more than 41 sites on the human genome have been linked to the development of obesity when a favorable environment is present. (wikipedia.org)
  • risk
  • Using data from the Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System matched with Walmart Supercenter entry dates and locations, we examine the effects of Supercenters on body mass index (BMI) and obesity. (repec.org)
  • For WtHR measures, the authors say that a cut-off value of 0.5 in adults has been proposed as a way of indicating whether the amount of upper body fat accumulation is excessive and poses a risk to health. (www.nhs.uk)
  • A recent meta-analysis of 21 independent prospective studies found that the relative risk of pancreatic cancer per 5 kg/m 2 increase in body mass index (BMI) to be 1.16 (95% CI, 1.06-1.17) in men and 1.10 (95% CI, 1.02-1.19) in women ( 5 ). (aacrjournals.org)
  • A study suggested that smoking before and during pregnancy, for example, increases the risk of obesity twofold in children of school age. (wikipedia.org)
  • However, BMI does not account for the wide variation in body fat distribution, and may not correspond to the same degree of fatness or associated health risk in different individuals and populations. (wikipedia.org)
  • Children who are externally motivated to eat are at a higher risk for obesity. (wikipedia.org)
  • After essentially coming in at a dead heat in the 55 to 64 bracket, female obesity becomes a higher risk for 65- to 74-year-olds than it does for males, only to switch odds again after 75. (wikipedia.org)
  • The risk of obesity is determined by not only specific genotypes but also gene-gene interactions. (wikipedia.org)
  • maternal
  • Maternal obesity refers to obesity (often including being overweight) of a woman during pregnancy. (wikipedia.org)
  • Maternal obesity has a significant impact on maternal metabolism and offspring development. (wikipedia.org)
  • However, little is known about the link between maternal obesity and diabetic effects in offspring. (wikipedia.org)
  • Maternal obesity is associated with increased odds of pregnancies affected by congenital anomalies, including neural tube defects and spina bifida. (wikipedia.org)
  • Maternal obesity is linked with elective preterm delivery, neonatal death, and delivery of an extremely low birth weight infant. (wikipedia.org)
  • Maternal obesity is also known to be associated with increased rates of complications in late pregnancy such as cesarean delivery, and shoulder dystocia. (wikipedia.org)
  • Causal
  • The theory of environmental obesogens proposes a different causal facet to obesity - that lifetime exposure to xenobiotic chemicals may change the body's metabolic system. (wikipedia.org)
  • genes
  • We genotyped 15 single nucleotide polymorphisms of fat mass and obesity-associated ( FTO ), peroxisome proliferators-activated receptor gamma ( PPARγ ), nuclear receptor family 5 member 2 ( NR5A2 ), AMPK , and ADIPOQ genes in 1,070 patients with pancreatic cancer and 1,175 cancer-free controls. (aacrjournals.org)
  • although, only in a few cases are genes the primary cause of obesity. (wikipedia.org)
  • Polymorphisms in various genes controlling appetite and metabolism predispose to obesity under certain dietary conditions. (wikipedia.org)
  • intra-abdominal
  • Patients with sarcopenic obesity have a relative increase in intra-abdominal fat that is greater than subcutaneous or total body fat and a relative decrease in peripheral fat that is greater than central fat-free mass resulting from the loss of skeletal muscle. (jaoa.org)
  • weight
  • Both studies relied on the use of the Body Mass Index scale, which is simply a ratio of one's weight in kilograms divided by their height in metres squared. (huffingtonpost.ca)
  • In part, the scale is used as a global indicator of obesity because it's much easier to gather mass data on height and weight than other factors. (huffingtonpost.ca)
  • However, according to the Telegraph, it doesn't take into account where children carry extra weight, and may therefore fail to detect cases where children are carrying too much body fat. (www.nhs.uk)
  • The key is to know your body, so you'll know when you're in the proper weight range. (ufl.edu)
  • Body mass index is the standard for classifying weight and is the most practical method to determine the extent of obesity. (jaoa.org)
  • According to Professor Robert H. Lustig from the University of California, San Francisco, "[E]ven those at the lower end of the body mass index (BMI) curve are gaining weight. (wikipedia.org)
  • Many explanations exist to explain the disparity, among which include different behaviors among racial and ethnic groups, differing cultural norms in regards to body weight and size, and unequal access to healthy foods. (wikipedia.org)
  • In 2005 Flegal and co-authors from CDC and NIH published a study in JAMA which found that being overweight was associated with lower mortality than normal weight and that obesity was associated with slightly higher mortality. (wikipedia.org)
  • The average body weight among Nauruans is estimated to be approximately 100 kilograms (220 lb). (wikipedia.org)
  • genetic
  • Like many other medical conditions, obesity is the result of an interplay between environmental and genetic factors. (wikipedia.org)
  • among
  • This study examined patterns of body mass index (BMI) and obesity among a nationally representative sample of first-, second- and third-generation Latinos and Asian Americans to reveal associations with nativity or country of origin. (rwjf.org)
  • The authors found substantial heterogeneity in BMI and obesity by country of origin and an increase in BMI in later generations among most subgroups. (rwjf.org)
  • They conclude that generational status is associated with increased BMI and obesity among Latinos and Asian Americans. (rwjf.org)
  • This supports the theory that watching too much television is "one of the most easily modifiable causes of obesity among children. (wikipedia.org)
  • Some other anomalies that were increased among mothers with obesity included septal anomalies, cleft palate, cleft lip and palate, anorectal atresia, hydrocephaly, and limb reduction anomalies. (wikipedia.org)
  • rise
  • has Chile is facing a progressive rise in obesity with the corres. (scribd.com)
  • Casilla 138-11.1 The most probable causes The Ministry of Health of Chile.d. the large income disparity and rise in particularly obesity.3 prevalence has been the greatest. (scribd.com)
  • These results imply that the proliferation of Walmart Supercenters explains 10.5% of the rise in obesity since the late 1980s, but the resulting increase in medical expenditures offsets only a small portion of consumers' savings from shopping at Supercenters. (repec.org)
  • levels
  • The authors say previous research has suggested that child obesity levels have stabilised in recent years. (www.nhs.uk)
  • Obesity hypoventilation syndrome (also known as Pickwickian syndrome) is a condition in which severely overweight people fail to breathe rapidly enough or deeply enough, resulting in low blood oxygen levels and high blood carbon dioxide (CO2) levels. (wikipedia.org)
  • Obesity hypoventilation syndrome is defined as the combination of obesity (body mass index above 30 kg/m2), hypoxemia (falling oxygen levels in blood) during sleep, and hypercapnia (increased blood carbon dioxide levels) during the day, resulting from hypoventilation (excessively slow or shallow breathing). (wikipedia.org)
  • Rising levels of obesity are a major challenge to public health. (wikipedia.org)
  • medical
  • I think the most important thing to take from this piece is that weights are rising whether or not you want to nitpick around what level we should call the cutoff for medical obesity. (huffingtonpost.ca)
  • It is generally agreed upon by many in the medical community that environmental factors and poor health and eating habits are still considered to be the strongest contributors to obesity. (wikipedia.org)
  • According to a report published by the Commons Health Select Committee in November 2015, treating obesity related medical conditions costs the National Health Service (NHS) £5 billion a year and has a wider cost to the economy of £27 billion. (wikipedia.org)
  • people
  • Therefore, body builders and people who have a lot of muscle bulk will have a high BMI but are not overweight. (ifso.com)
  • Since dietary habits are shaped in early life, adolescence is a critical period to educate our young people to acquire a healthy eating habit to prevent obesity. (clinicaltrials.gov)
  • It however is less accurate in people such as body builders and pregnant women. (wikipedia.org)
  • Most people with obesity hypoventilation syndrome have concurrent obstructive sleep apnea, a condition characterized by snoring, brief episodes of apnea (cessation of breathing) during the night, interrupted sleep and excessive daytime sleepiness. (wikipedia.org)
  • Hence, people with obesity need to expend more energy to breathe effectively. (wikipedia.org)
  • Obesity in New Zealand has become an important national health concern in recent years, with high numbers of people afflicted in every age and ethnic group. (wikipedia.org)
  • Professor Jimmy Bell, an obesity specialist at Imperial College London, has stated that contrary to popular belief, the people of the United Kingdom have not become greedier or less active in recent years. (wikipedia.org)
  • accumulates
  • It's particularly the fat that accumulates inside your body and ends up around the kidney and around your liver and around your heart,' he said. (huffingtonpost.ca)