• This unexpected finding suggests that nucleic acid derivatives cannot bind their complementary sequences during mtDNA replication. (edu.au)
  • A method and apparatus for analyzing nucleic acids includes immobilizing nucleic probes at specific sites within a microchannel structure and moving target nucleic acids into proximity to the probes in order to allow hybridization and fluorescence detection of specific target sequences. (osti.gov)
  • The present invention is directed to a method of sequencing a target nucleic acid molecule having a plurality of bases. (google.es)
  • The only exception to this is the case of RNA viruses, such as the AIDS virus, in which RNA is the only nucleic acid present in the virus and the genetic material. (encyclopedia.com)
  • These tests analyze variations in the sequence, structure, or expression of deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) and ribonucleic acid (RNA) in order to diagnose disease or medical conditions, infection with an identifiable pathogen, or determine genetic carrier status. (fda.gov)
  • This article covers the chemistry of nucleic acids, describing the structures and properties that allow them to serve as the transmitters of genetic information. (britannica.com)
  • For a discussion of the genetic code , see heredity , and for a discussion of the role played by nucleic acids in protein synthesis, see metabolism . (britannica.com)
  • The ability to generate functional nucleic acids encoded by both strands of a duplex has implications for the evolution of catalytic nucleic acids and the prospects for realizing maximum functionality from a given genetic sequence. (springer.com)
  • Recent investigations associated with gene therapy and vaccines leave little doubt that naked and free nucleic acids are readily taken up by the cells of all species including human beings, and may become integrated into the cell s genetic material. (i-sis.org.uk)
  • Naked nucleic acids are DNA/RNA produced in the laboratory and intended for use in, or as the result of genetic engineering (1). (i-sis.org.uk)
  • The constructs typically contain antibiotic resistance marker genes plus a heterogeneous array of genes from pathogenic bacteria, viruses and other genetic parasites belonging to practically every kingdom of living organisms on earth (2).Most of the naked nucleic acids and constructs have either never existed in nature, or if they have, not in such large amounts. (i-sis.org.uk)
  • In this review, we introduce our recently-developed simplified genetic code in order to discuss why the genetic code likely evolved from a simpler form encoding fewer than 20 amino acids. (rsc.org)
  • The design and development of nucleic acid-based therapeutics for the treatment of diseases arising from genetic abnormalities has made significant progress over the past few years. (elsevier.com)
  • The Northwestern CCNE will explore these vast possibilities by applying a novel class of nanostructure genetic constructs - the spherical nucleic acid (SNA) and variants of it - for the study and treatment of brain and prostate cancer. (cancer.gov)
  • The particular sequence of amino acids in each polypeptide chain is determined by the genetic code. (factmonster.com)
  • After investigation had shown that the use of the specific information contained in nucleic acids could have enormous advantages in the recognition of infectious disease parameters and genetic conditions, investigators attempted to make nucleic acids the subject matter of assays. (google.es)
  • Two nucleic acids, deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) and ribonucleic acid (RNA) , are found in living things which serve to store, translate, and pass on the genetic information of an organism to the next generation. (jrank.org)
  • Sugars and Phosphates groups play as structure of the backbone, while bases carries genetic components, which characterized the differences of nucleic acids. (wikibooks.org)
  • Nucleic Acid Chemistry and Genetic Engineering Conference aims to bring together leading academic scientists, researchers and research scholars to exchange and share their experiences and research results on all aspects of Nucleic Acid Chemistry and Genetic Engineering Conference. (waset.org)
  • It also provides a premier interdisciplinary platform for researchers, practitioners, and educators to present and discuss the most recent innovations, trends, and concerns as well as practical challenges encountered and solutions adopted in the fields of Nucleic Acid Chemistry and Genetic Engineering Conference. (waset.org)
  • The second part of the book is devoted to applying the gas-phase approaches to solve specific questions related to the biophysics, biochemistry or pharmacology of nucleic acids. (springer.com)
  • Bentham Science's seventh volume of Applications of NMR Spectroscopy, published by Bentham Science Publishers covers NMR methods in proteomics and metabolomics, and nucleic acid biochemistry. (news-medical.net)
  • The NIH Guidelines apply to all recombinant or synthetic nucleic acid research conducted at, or sponsored by, an institution that receives support from the NIH for such purposes. (uvm.edu)
  • A requirement for prior NIH approval or any or all recombinant or synthetic nucleic acid molecule projects at UVM. (uvm.edu)
  • NOTE: Deliberate transfer of synthetic nucleic acids into one or more human research participants may not be exempt. (uvm.edu)
  • The authors provide practical advice for performing experiments with synthetic nucleic acids, including long noncoding RNAs (lncRNAs) and microRNAs (miRNAs) and present minimum standards for published research. (eurekalert.org)
  • Title: International Meeting on Nucleic Acid Vaccines for The Prevention of Infectious Diseases Location: Natcher Conference Center, Bethesda, Maryland, USA Dates: 5 - 7 February 1996 Subject: A review of scientific advances in immunology, vaccinology, work on primates, vaccine safety assessment, and other areas relevant to the development of nucleic acid vaccines. (bio.net)
  • The main potential applications for pathological studies are shown with particular aspects such as viral nucleic acids and in situ PCR. (routledge.com)
  • Viral nucleic acids have been found to be infectious for tissues and animals, yet are nonantigenic and resistant to antibodies against whole virus. (sciencemag.org)
  • Ebert and Wilt's excellent article indicates the impact of the newer knowledge of viral nucleic acids on the ideas developing in the field of embryology. (sciencemag.org)
  • Some examples of recombinant nucleic acids frequently used in research include plasmids, viral vectors, and shRNAs. (uvm.edu)
  • Nucleic acid technology has made possible the manipulation, amplification, selection and characterization of a potentially very large number of eukaryotic, prokaryotic and viral genes. (google.ca)
  • Nucleic acid tests are performed in order to detect the presence of viral DNAs or RNAs in blood samples of patients. (pitchengine.com)
  • Despite the fact that non-viral nucleic acid delivery systems are generally considered to be less efficient than viral vectors, they have gained much interest in recent years due to their superior safety profile compared to their viral counterpart. (mdpi.com)
  • The release from infected tissues of even a small proportion of total virus as free nucleic acid could, in an otherwise immune individual, lead to a low level of infection which would, perhaps, explain permanent immunity. (sciencemag.org)
  • A huge variety of naked/free nucleic acids are being produced in the laboratory and released unregulated into the environment. (i-sis.org.uk)
  • The need to establish regulatory oversight of naked/free nucleic acids at both national and international levels is long overdue. (i-sis.org.uk)
  • Free nucleic acids refer to the laboratory-produced nucleic acids transfected into cells or organisms, whether incorporated as transgenic DNA or not, and subsequently released into the environment by secretion, excretion, waste disposal, death, industrial processing, or carried by liquid streams, or in airborne dust and pollen. (i-sis.org.uk)
  • In this review, we will summarise the latest developments in peptide-based cellular delivery of nucleic acid cargos. (mdpi.com)
  • Those that consist solely of the exact nucleic acid sequence from a single source that exists contemporaneously in nature. (uvm.edu)
  • Those that consist entirely of nucleic acids from a prokaryotic host, including its indigenous plasmids or viruses when propagated in that host - or a closely related strain of the same species - or when transferred to another host by well-established physiological means. (uvm.edu)
  • The development and application of nucleic acid aptamers for targeted cancer therapy and cancer biomarker identification were reviewed. (rsc.org)
  • CPPs are capable of mediating the cellular uptake of hydrophilic macromolecules like peptides and nucleic acids (e.g. siRNAs, aptamers and antisenseoligonucleotides), which are internalised by cells at a very low rate when applied alone. (mdpi.com)
  • These are based on the inorganic acid H 3 PO 4 (phosphoric acid). (rsc.org)
  • These groups can react with carboxylic acids and phosphoric acid to form esters. (rsc.org)