• This unexpected finding suggests that nucleic acid derivatives cannot bind their complementary sequences during mtDNA replication. (edu.au)
  • The general consensus prior to the mid-1940s was that proteins (which contain twenty different amino acids) were the most logical candidate for the genetic material. (encyclopedia.com)
  • More than just chock full of nucleic acids, eggs have just the kind of amino and nucleic acids needed by humans. (ehow.com)
  • While mostly in the form of DNA, mushrooms also have a number of nucleic and amino acids which create protein. (ehow.com)
  • 1. An isolated nucleic acid molecule encoding an amino acid sequence as shown in SEQ ID No: 15. (google.es)
  • 2'-fluoropyrimidine RNA-based aptamers to the 165-amino acid form of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF165): inhibition of receptor binding and VEGF-induced vascular permeability through interactions requiring the exon 7-encoded domain," Journal of Biological Chemistry , vol. 273, no. 32, pp. 20556-20567, 1998. (hindawi.com)
  • The complete amino acid sequence of human fibroblast interferon as deduced using synthetic oligodeoxyribonucleotide primers of reverse transcriptase. (uni-trier.de)
  • In this review, we introduce our recently-developed simplified genetic code in order to discuss why the genetic code likely evolved from a simpler form encoding fewer than 20 amino acids. (rsc.org)
  • Adding hydrophobic or hydrophilic amino acid side chains at the γ position (R) of a PNA's individual backbone peptide units enables PNA strands to self-assemble into spherical aggregates. (acs.org)
  • The Immobilizer™ Amino surface forms stable covalent bonds between its electrophilic groups and the biomolecule's free amino acids or sulfhydryl groups. (thermofisher.com)
  • Using amino acids and the process known as protein synthesis, the specific sequencing in DNA of these nucleobase-pairs enables storing and transmitting coded instructions as genes. (wikipedia.org)
  • The body uses the information stored in DNA to create proteins, which are made up of subunits called amino acids. (livestrong.com)
  • Adenine is one of the byproducts of the Purine metabolism, where inosine monophosphate (IMP) is synthesized with a pre-existing ribose through a complex process involving atoms from the amino acids glycine, glutamine, and aspartic acid, in addition to the formate ions transferred from coenzyme tetrahydrofolate. (wikibooks.org)
  • These light-induced reactions have been associated with cancer and other diseases in living organisms [ 5 , 6 , 7 ], and photochemical investigations of nucleic and amino acids continue to be at the forefront of research. (mdpi.com)
  • Amino acids are the main source of chemical energy for H. salinarum, particularly arginine and aspartate, though they are able to metabolize other amino acids, as well. (wikipedia.org)
  • Arginine-modified DNA aptamers that show enantioselective recognition of the dicarboxylic acid moiety of glutamic acid," Analytical Sciences , vol. 24, no. 1, pp. 167-172, 2008. (hindawi.com)
  • Selecting aptamers for a glycoprotein through the incorporation of the boronic acid moiety," Journal of the American Chemical Society , vol. 130, no. 38, pp. 12636-12638, 2008. (hindawi.com)
  • The binding affinity and specificity of nucleic acid aptamers have made them valuable candidates for use as sensors in diagnostic applications. (hindawi.com)
  • Our assay precludes the covalent modification of nucleic acids and relies on the differential fluorescence signal of chromophores when complexed with aptamers with or without their cognate target. (hindawi.com)
  • The development and application of nucleic acid aptamers for targeted cancer therapy and cancer biomarker identification were reviewed. (rsc.org)
  • The immense diversity in function and structure of nucleic acids enable numerous aptamers to be generated through an iterative in vitro selection technique known as Systematic Evolution of Ligands by EXponential enrichment (SELEX). (scirp.org)
  • This review focuses on recent advances in the use of nucleic acid aptamers as diagnostic and therapeutic agents and as targeted delivery carriers that are relevant to lymphoma. (scirp.org)
  • K. Shum, J. Zhou and J. Rossi, "Nucleic Acid Aptamers as Potential Therapeutic and Diagnostic Agents for Lymphoma," Journal of Cancer Therapy , Vol. 4 No. 4, 2013, pp. 872-890. (scirp.org)
  • Nucleic acid , naturally occurring chemical compound that is capable of being broken down to yield phosphoric acid , sugars, and a mixture of organic bases (purines and pyrimidines). (britannica.com)
  • They have a complex structure formed of sugars (pentoses), phosphoric acid, and nitrogen bases (purines and pyrimidines). (thefreedictionary.com)
  • Experimental studies of nucleic acids constitute a major part of modern biological and medical research, and form a foundation for genome and forensic science, and the biotechnology and pharmaceutical industries. (wikipedia.org)
  • The main potential applications for pathological studies are shown with particular aspects such as viral nucleic acids and in situ PCR. (routledge.com)
  • Viral nucleic acids have been found to be infectious for tissues and animals, yet are nonantigenic and resistant to antibodies against whole virus. (sciencemag.org)
  • Ebert and Wilt's excellent article indicates the impact of the newer knowledge of viral nucleic acids on the ideas developing in the field of embryology. (sciencemag.org)
  • What are the two forms of nucleic acids called? (oneonta.edu)
  • Several artificial forms of nucleic acid chains are used for various purposes, such as FISH or RNAi . (wikidoc.org)
  • In the regular workflow there is a lysis step, where the cells are taken and opened to expose the nucleic acid to the external environment, then a binding step onto a membrane on the column, followed by several wash steps to get rid of any cell debris, the proteins and other materials outside of the nucleic acids. (news-medical.net)
  • The vast majority of nucleic acid assays, whether involving manipulation, amplification, selection or characterization, are performed using nucleic acid that has been isolated or separated from its source (e.g. isolated from cells, separated from proteins, etc. (google.ca)
  • Focused on developing platform technologies for the delivery of nucleic acids inside cells. (umass.edu)
  • Free nucleic acids refer to the laboratory-produced nucleic acids transfected into cells or organisms, whether incorporated as transgenic DNA or not, and subsequently released into the environment by secretion, excretion, waste disposal, death, industrial processing, or carried by liquid streams, or in airborne dust and pollen. (i-sis.org.uk)
  • Although first discovered within the nucleus of eukaryotic cells, nucleic acids are now known to be found in all life forms including within bacteria, archaea, mitochondria, chloroplasts, viruses, and viroids. (wikipedia.org)
  • Nucleic acids are universal to all life, in eukaryotic and prokaryotic cells, as well as in viruses. (jrank.org)
  • The information in the genes (lengths of nucleic acid) in the nucleus is translated by cells into polypeptides and proteins in the cytoplasm. (jrank.org)
  • The purpose of this initiative is to incentivize small businesses to generate new technologies and products for delivering nucleic acids into cells and tissues for the purpose of treatment or prevention of human disease. (nih.gov)
  • Fatty acids and cholesterol are key components of the membranes that surround all cells. (livestrong.com)
  • It's ideal for nucleic acid extraction from cells, tissue, blood and even challenging formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded (FFPE) samples. (beckman.com)
  • A huge variety of naked nucleic acids are being produced in the laboratory (see Box 1), which are used as research tools, in industrial productions, and in medical applications such as gene therapy and vaccines. (i-sis.org.uk)
  • Innate receptors TLR3, TLR7, TLR8, and TLR9, for example, recognize nucleic acid types that are normally found in bacteria and viruses ( 3 ), as do the RNA helicases melanoma differentiation-associated gene 5 and retinoic acid-inducible gene I ( 4 ). (jimmunol.org)
  • We discuss how synergy between adaptive and innate immune responses can lead to autoimmunity, including aspects such as colocalization between receptor and ligand, the impact that methylation and other modifications have on the receptors' sensitivity to nucleic acids, and gene dosage of these receptors. (jimmunol.org)
  • 2. The method for preparing nucleic acid samples of claim 1, further comprising, after step (b), the step of amplifying said nucleic acid. (google.ca)
  • The release from infected tissues of even a small proportion of total virus as free nucleic acid could, in an otherwise immune individual, lead to a low level of infection which would, perhaps, explain permanent immunity. (sciencemag.org)
  • A huge variety of naked/free nucleic acids are being produced in the laboratory and released unregulated into the environment. (i-sis.org.uk)
  • The need to establish regulatory oversight of naked/free nucleic acids at both national and international levels is long overdue. (i-sis.org.uk)
  • b) adding transferrin to said nucleic acid to neutralize said polymerase inhibitor. (google.ca)
  • b) adding globin to said nucleic acid to neutralize said polymerase inhibitor in the presence of a cofactor selected from the group consisting of bicarbonate ion, azide ion, thiocyanate ion, cyanate ion, oxalate ion, malonate ion, glycinate ion, thioglycolate ion and salts thereof. (google.ca)
  • The growing nucleic acid strand is extended by using the polymerase to add a nucleotide analog to the nucleic acid strand at the active site, where the nucleotide analog being added is complementary to the nucleotide of the target nucleic acid at the active site. (google.es)