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  • Cell Biol
  • Christopher Akey , a biophysicist at Boston University who coauthored another imaging study of the nuclear pore complex a year after Milligan and colleagues ( J Cell Biol , 122:1-19, 1993), notes that iteration is the easiest way to build a structure as large as the nuclear pore, like building a wall brick by brick. (the-scientist.com)
  • 2000
  • That barrier has on average, 2000 pores in it, each of which serve as a gatekeeper, either allowing a molecule through, or barring its entry. (phys.org)
  • Structures
  • That first glimpse of symmetry from years earlier came into focus: the nuclear pore complex was not only made up of eight identical structures repeated around its circumference, it was also symmetric across the plane of the membrane ( Cell , 69:1133-41, 1992). (the-scientist.com)
  • The idea was borne out by later research from other labs showing smaller structures on either side of the pore, completing Milligan's picture of this unique structure. (the-scientist.com)
  • 2016
  • El-Tanani M, Dakir EH, Raynor B, Morgan R (2016) Mechanisms of nuclear export in cancer and resistance to chemotherapy. (springer.com)
  • researchers
  • In these two new efforts, both teams have managed to create maps of the different layers that make up the rings of the pores, offering other medical researchers a new way perhaps, to combat diseases that manage to make it through the NPC. (phys.org)
  • In an artificial system recreating the nuclear pore, the researchers tested their hypothesis. (science20.com)
  • molecules
  • But for all non-binding molecules the nuclear pore acts as a barrier. (science20.com)
  • The binding should be just strong enough that molecules to be transported can bind but at the same time not too tight so that they can still diffuse through the pore. (science20.com)
  • CELL , 69:1133-41, 1992, COURTESY RON MILLIGAN W hen he was a postdoc in the 1970s, Ronald Milligan came across a grainy electron micrograph in a textbook that depicted the nuclear pore complex, a relatively unstudied but crucial structure responsible for shuttling molecules in and out of the nucleus. (the-scientist.com)