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  • embryos
  • WASHINGTON (CNS) - Catholic observers and others are raising ethical questions about the work of an international team of scientists who report that they were able to edit the DNA in human embryos to correct a health disorder. (catholicphilly.com)
  • The questions focus on two concerns: the creation of human embryos for scientific experimentation and then destruction, and the still-unknown effect that changing DNA will have on future generations because the changes could become a permanent part of a family's genetic line. (catholicphilly.com)
  • Now we're specifically manufacturing human embryos solely for the purpose of doing lethal experiments on them. (catholicphilly.com)
  • Scientists said they were able to edit the DNA in human embryos without introducing other harmful mutations that have plagued other efforts. (catholicphilly.com)
  • The fact that none of the embryos were used to create a baby is problematic, however, for Catholic ethicists, who say the destruction of human life violates the basic premise of church teaching that all life is sacred. (catholicphilly.com)
  • Father Tadeusz Pacholczyk, director of education at the National Catholic Bioethics Center in Philadelphia, told CNS that he is concerned that human embryos have been created in vitro and "treated not as ends but as mere means to achieve particular investigative goals. (catholicphilly.com)
  • Father Pacholczyk said the team's experiments "were clearly nontherapeutic, as the goal was ultimately to destroy the embryos. (catholicphilly.com)
  • http://www.koreaherald.co.kr/SITE/data/html_dir/2005/12/06/200512060023.asp ), Hwang and his team in Korea are still refusing to have their spectacular patient-specific "stem cells" retested -- those derived from human embryos cloned from a sick patient's own adult cells. (lifeissues.net)
  • Or perhaps Hwang and his team are a bit reluctant because they already know beforehand that it is physically and scientifically impossible that these "stem cells" from cloned human embryos really match the patients into whom they were injected? (lifeissues.net)
  • In an address to the Ninth General Assembly of the Pontifical Academy for Life , de Pope called on everyone to speak out against the destructive research on human embryos I am convinced that no one, much less the Church, is allowed to be silent in the face of certain result or pretexts of experimentation on man , he said. (danielserrao.com)
  • eugenics
  • The nation's key eugenic organizations funded by the Rockefeller, Harriman and Carnegie families included the American Eugenics Society (AES), and its sister organization, the American Society of Human Genetics (ASHG) established in 1947, the Cold Springs Harbor Experimental Station for the Study of Evolution, the Eugenic Record Office, and the Rockefeller Institute for Medical Research. (all.org)
  • They promoted eugenic counseling, selective mating and artificial insemination as 'positive' means of breeding superior human stock and compulsory sterilization and euthanasia as forms of 'negative' eugenics to weed out 'inferior' or 'unfit' human stock. (all.org)
  • German medicine under Hitler resulted in so many horrors - eugenics, human experimentation, forced sterilization, involuntary euthanasia, mass murder - that there is a temptation to say that "Nazi doctors had no ethics. (blogspot.be)
  • Eugenics is characterized by the devising of interventions aimed at improving the quality of the human genome. (encyclopedia.com)
  • In addition, the emphasis of advocates for eugenics is not on improving the quality of the human genome. (encyclopedia.com)
  • practice
  • When attempts to use sheep's and calve's blood in the first human transfusions in the late 1660s produced questionable and some harmful results, the practice was banned in France for over 100 years. (iupui.edu)
  • The protagonists of the practice of human experimentation justify their views on the basis that such experiments yield results for the good of society that are unprocurable by other methods or means of study. (wordpress.com)
  • subject
  • Whether and how humans might be investigated, however, has always been subject to the laws and customs of the society and government at the time. (iupui.edu)
  • They simply redefined the subject of experimentation to exclude concentration camp inmates. (blogspot.be)
  • The report found that institutional review boards (IRBs), which judge the scientific and ethical merit of proposed human studies, are overburdened with work, staffed by insufficiently trained people and subject to conflicts of interest. (washingtonpost.com)
  • The responsibility for the human subject must always rest with a medically qualified person and never rest on the subject of the research, even though the subject has given consent. (lifeissues.net)
  • The court held that neither incapacitated adults nor minors could participate in any research protocol that contained a nontherapeutic element, irrespective of possible benefits to the subject or the importance of the knowledge to be gained. (georgetown.edu)
  • involving human subjects
  • In both of these international research ethics codes, the scientists performing the research - especially research involving human subjects - must have truly "mastered" the field of science in which they are experimenting (which would include advanced course work, advanced academic degrees and extensive lab and clinical experience) - otherwise, obviously, they don't know what they are talking about or doing. (lifeissues.net)
  • traits
  • Tomorrow may see the rise of State sponsored Genoism which defines what human traits are acceptably defined as 'person. (personhood.org)
  • scientific
  • He emphasized that "the Church respects and supports scientific research when it pursues an authentically humanistic orientation, fleeing from every form of exploitation or destruction of the human being and keeping itself free from the slavery of political and economic interests. (danielserrao.com)
  • Child subjects are increasingly put at risk of harm insofar as the current institutional review board (IRB) system that is supposed to review, approve and oversee the scientific integrity and safety of human research is riddled by conflict of interests. (ahrp.org)
  • genetics
  • New technological developments in human genetics including cytogenics, cell culture, and prenatal diagnosis, combined with changes in state abortion laws to accommodate eugenic killing now made such a campaign both possible and practical. (all.org)
  • Genetics and Human Behavior: II. (encyclopedia.com)
  • Home Science Encyclopedias almanacs transcripts and maps Genetics and Human Behavior: II. (encyclopedia.com)
  • Rather than address those issues, this entry examines some of the social and ethical issues that may arise as a result of what researchers in behavioral genetics claim to know regarding the role of genes in shaping human behavior. (encyclopedia.com)
  • practices
  • South Korea's Ministry of Health and Welfare proposed the law to the South Korean National Assembly to allow the progress of biotechnology and life sciences research in South Korea while protecting human research subjects with practices such as informed consent. (asu.edu)
  • medically
  • Or might incentives seduce poor or medically desperate people into taking unwise risks, and perhaps foster the creation of an underclass of professional human guinea pigs? (washingtonpost.com)
  • scientifically
  • My guess is that with the onslaught of genetic engineering (including plants, animals, humans, drugs, devices, etc.), including synthetic biology and nanotechnology, the issues surrounding ethically justified and scientifically sound research affecting human subjects will become more pertinent than ever. (lifeissues.net)
  • legislation
  • We note that constitutional amendments are not self-enforcing, so legislation will be necessary to mandate the protection empowered by a Human Life Amendment. (grtl.org)
  • 1960s
  • The resulting imagery and information would contribute substantially to new visual and biomedical conceptions of fetuses as baby-like, autonomous human entities that emerged in the 1960s and 1970s. (jhu.edu)
  • result
  • This result demonstrates that humans use the similarity in the temporal structure of multisensory signals to solve the correspondence problem, hence inferring causation from correlation. (ox.ac.uk)
  • consent
  • Under today's laws, humans in the United States may not be experimented on without their written consent and may elect to withdraw voluntarily from research at any time. (releasechimps.org)
  • While the first chapter of this study focused primarily on the historical origins of informed consent and its second on the articulation of this concept in human-rights documents, the purpose of this chapter is to trace the issue of informed consent throughout the Magisterial teaching of the Roman Catholic Church (first section) and its treatment in relevant philosophical and theological literature (second section). (springer.com)
  • Consent Issues in Human Research. (springer.com)
  • But unlike adults who can exercise their autonomous right to informed consent, children who are enrolled in clinical trials are non-consensual human subjects. (ahrp.org)
  • dependent
  • The NRLC…opposes the intentional killing of a dependent human being for his or her alleged benefit whether by active intervention or by omitting treatment. (grtl.org)
  • Principles
  • 1. Provide the reader with an appreciation and basic understanding of the ethical principles, and regulatory process and means by which compliance can be assured, and the responsibilities that a researcher assumes when choosing to involve human subjects in a research activity, 2. (unh.edu)
  • life
  • Our culture today challenges the Personhood of several classes of human life. (personhood.org)
  • GRTL opposes abortion at any point of gestation, as it destroys a living, growing human life. (grtl.org)
  • GRTL asserts the need for a Constitutional amendment, which would annul the 1973 Supreme Court decision legalizing abortion and return to the people the power to protect all human life, from fertilization until natural death. (grtl.org)
  • ethics
  • Such an analysis was carried out by the Advisory Commission of Human Radiation Experiments (ACHRE), and for that reason ACHRE stands apart from all subsequent ethics advisory committees whose recommendations were unsupported by evidence. (ahrp.org)
  • treatment
  • In the trials, the researchers found that the treatment helped alleviate the symptoms of Parkinson's disease in humans . (asu.edu)