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  • lateral
  • The femoral nerve and lateral gastrocnemius muscle were harvested after completion of femoral nerve CD injury time point to assess for SC proliferation/senescence markers (via qPCR) and muscle atrophy (via muscle weight). (nesps.org)
  • Features the anatomy and technique to block: The supraclavicular, suprascapular, intercostobrachial and lateral and medial antebrachial cutaneous nerves. (nysora.com)
  • subscapularis
  • Based on that a detailed evalu- ation and treatment of the nerves of the upper extremity follow: N. accesorius, N. subscapularis, N. axillaris, N. radialis, N. musculocutaneus, N.cutaneus an- tebrachii medialis, N. medianus and N. ulnaris. (munich-group.com)
  • surgical
  • The surgical decision to perform nerve repair and/or reconstruction depends on the type of injury, the condition of the wound as well as the vascularity of the wound. (diva-portal.org)
  • A thorough review of tendon/nerve physiology, pathomechanics, and surgical techniques will create a foundation for proper intervention. (tnseminars.com)
  • structures
  • Depending on how irritable the condition is, you will then proceed with fluid dynamic techniques to lessen congestion, decompression techniques to release adjacent muscles, ligaments and bones, and neural flossing techniques to lessen adhesions between nerves and neighboring structures. (nervemobilization.com)
  • spine
  • If the lower extremity reflexes are increased, but arms are 'normal', it suggests there could be a problem in the spine. (healthtap.com)
  • outcome
  • Functional outcome measures were assessed with standardized upper extremity outcome measures [British Medical Research Council (BMRC) scale for group 1 and Action Research Arm Test (ARAT) for group showing significant improvements in motor function after sEMG training. (frontiersin.org)
  • transfers
  • Nerve transfers capitalize on these two factors and are the reason for their clinical success. (frontiersin.org)
  • Nerve transfers, by definition, involve coapting a healthy, expendable donor nerve or fascicle to a denervated recipient nerve to restore function to the recipient end-organ (skin for sensation or muscle for motor function). (frontiersin.org)
  • After standard nerve transfers individually tailored sEMG biofeedback can facilitate early sensorimotor re-education by providing visual cues at a stage when muscle activation cannot be detected otherwise. (frontiersin.org)
  • function
  • To confirm nerve damage, electrodiagnostic studies (EMG and nerve conduction studies) may be performed to test the function of your nerves. (hss.edu)
  • Nerves get inflamed when pressure is applied and do not function properly. (drsamuelmoore.com)
  • We hypothesized that systemic GH therapy can maintain chronically-denervated muscle and SCs and improve murine extremity function in the setting of chronic denervation (CD). (nesps.org)
  • Systemic growth hormone therapy can maintain chronically-denervated muscle and Schwann cells and improve murine extremity function in the setting of chronic denervation. (nesps.org)
  • motor
  • Motor recovery following nerve transfer surgery depends on the successful re-innervation of the new target muscle by regenerating axons. (frontiersin.org)
  • muscles
  • The test entails stimulating the nerves with small electric shocks and inserting small acupuncture-like needles in certain muscles. (scottwolfemd.com)
  • damage
  • If the pressure is released within a short time, no permanent damage occurs and the nerve continues its normal functioning. (drsamuelmoore.com)
  • Sometimes, the damage may have affect a stretch of the nerve making it difficult to connect the two edges. (upperext.com)