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  • sympathetic nerve
  • To investigate this issue, in decerebrate, unanesthetized rats we tested the hypothesis that the increases in mean arterial blood pressure (MAP) and renal sympathetic nerve activity (RSNA) during 1 Hz dynamic stretch are larger when evoked from a previously "ligated" hindlimb compared to those evoked from the contralateral "freely perfused" hindlimb. (k-state.edu)
  • In humans with hypertension, the elevation in muscle sympathetic nerve activity seen during postexercise ischemia, a maneuver that selectively excites chemically sensitive muscle afferents, was higher than that in normotensive subjects ( 10 ). (physiology.org)
  • These rodent and human studies suggest that the skeletal muscle contraction-mediated reflex sympathetic nerve response is exaggerated in hypertension, thereby contributing to the excess sympathoexcitation and blood pressure elevation seen during exercise in this pathological condition. (physiology.org)
  • Stimulation
  • In general, skeletal muscle cells under voluntary control depolarize and contract after stimulation by neurohormones released from motor nerve cells. (arn.org)
  • Short of full-blown tetany, in medical conditions with a low blood calcium ( hypocalcaemia ) the motor axons in the peripheral nerves may show an increased sensitivity to mechanical stimulation. (encyclopedia.com)
  • 11 . The device of claim 1 , wherein the neural stimulation circuit and the controller are adapted to provide a post myocardial infarction therapy using the neural stimulation signal delivered by the neural stimulation circuit to depolarize the auricular branch of the vagus nerve. (google.es)
  • spasms
  • tetany refers to a state of increased excitability of nerve and muscle, characterized by muscle spasms. (encyclopedia.com)
  • this in turn increases the calcium proteinate and lowers free [Ca ++ ]. The increased excitability causes spontaneous tingling in lips and fingers and, through analogous effects on motor nerve fibres, characteristic muscular 'carpo-pedal' spasms, mainly affecting the wrists, hands, and feet. (encyclopedia.com)
  • tĕt`ənē) , condition of mineral imbalance in the body that results in severe muscle spasms. (thefreedictionary.com)
  • responses
  • A series of studies by Smith and colleagues ( 24 , 37 , 38 , 43 ) using a decerebrate rat preparation has suggested that in spontaneous hypertensive rats (SHRs), both mechanically and chemically sensitive muscle afferents engaged during skeletal muscle contraction are stimulated excessively compared with those in normotensive rats, thereby evoking exaggerated sympathoexcitatory and pressor responses to contraction. (physiology.org)
  • mechanoreceptors
  • Because this response occurred at very low workloads, we speculate that muscle mechanoreceptors are sensitized by cycolooxyegnase products under conditions of chronic limb ischemia. (wku.edu)
  • function
  • Also, to maintain the proper resting membrane potential for heart, nerve and muscle function requires the body to control its potassium as well. (arn.org)
  • proportions depending on the muscle function. (scribd.com)
  • The key finding here is that disordered sleep may affect nerve function in upper GI tract which could lead to worsening dyspepsia, creating a vicious cycle leading to more pain and more insomnia," said Dr. Lacy. (redorbit.com)
  • diagnosis
  • One or more of the AChR antibody tests may be ordered as part of a panel of tests that may also include a striated muscle antibody test to help establish a diagnosis. (labcorp.com)
  • receptors
  • Binding antibodies attach to the receptors on nerve cells and may initiate an inflammatory reaction that destroys the receptors. (labtestsonline.org)
  • A particular pathway that involves Cav1.1 as a voltage sensor for nerve activity, pannexin-1 channels to release ATP to the extracellular milieu, purinergic P2Y receptors to link the signal via G protein to PI3 kinase and phospholipase C, will finally give rise to slow, long-lasting calcium transients in the nuclear region that can be linked to either expression or repression of a variety of genes. (rsc.org)
  • tetany
  • The detection of a low calcium is clinically important, because tetany can be fatal should it be severe and involve laryngeal or pharyngeal muscles causing upper airway obstruction. (encyclopedia.com)
  • tissue
  • RT-PCR and immunoblot experiments showed that mRNA and protein for gp91 phox , a NADPH oxidase subunit, in skeletal muscle tissue were upregulated in hypertensive rats. (physiology.org)
  • mechanical
  • Dynamic stretch provided a mechanical stimulus in the absence of contraction-induced metabolite production that replicated closely the pattern of the mechanical stimulus present during dynamic contraction. (k-state.edu)
  • facial nerve
  • Nimodipine accelerates axonal sprouting after surgical repair of rat facial nerve. (semanticscholar.org)
  • The physician can make diagnostic use of this by tapping the facial nerve near the jaw joint in front of the ear, and looking for a twitch in the facial muscles - the so-called 'Chvostek's sign', named after the Austrian physician who first described it. (encyclopedia.com)
  • relaxant
  • Nighttime heartburn sufferers also may get relief ""and better sleep quality, from the muscle"Â relaxant and antispastic drug, baclofen, according to results of another new study unveiled today, "Baclofen Decreases Reflux and Improves Sleep Quality in Individuals with Nighttime Heartburn. (redorbit.com)
  • Although highly effective as a muscle relaxant, tubocurarine also caused significant hypotension (a drop in blood pressure ), which limited its use. (britannica.com)
  • normal
  • After depolarization takes place the nerve and muscle cells are able to return the membrane potential back to normal by stopping Na+ ions from entering and letting K+ ions leave. (arn.org)
  • absence
  • However, MuSK-dependent postsynaptic differentiation of NMJs occurs in the absence of a motor neuron, indicating a need for nerve/agrin-independent MuSK activation. (sigmaaldrich.com)
  • curare
  • Curare , drug belonging to the alkaloid family of organic compounds , derivatives of which are used in modern medicine primarily as skeletal muscle relaxants, being administered concomitantly with general anesthesia for certain types of surgeries , particularly those of the chest and the abdomen. (britannica.com)