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  • practices
  • Meeting several times per semester, the Council creates innovative assessment strategies, monitors compliance with university and accreditation assessment policies, shares success stories and assessment-related challenges, and develops meaningful practices to improve student learning across NYU programs and units. (nyu.edu)
  • hazardous
  • One prominent application area for alternatives assessment is the substitution of hazardous chemicals with safer alternatives, also known as chemical alternatives assessment. (wikipedia.org)
  • Chemical alternatives assessment (or substitution of hazardous chemicals) is the use of alternatives assessment for finding safer and environmentally preferable design options to reduce or eliminate the use of hazardous chemical substances. (wikipedia.org)
  • The Massachusetts Toxics Use Reduction Institute has conducted alternatives assessments for the substitution of hazardous substances like lead and formaldehyde. (wikipedia.org)
  • Exposure
  • Exposure assessment is a branch of environmental science and occupational hygiene that focuses on the processes that take place at the interface between the environment containing the contaminant(s) of interest and the organism(s) being considered. (wikipedia.org)
  • Although the same general concepts apply to other organisms, the overwhelming majority of applications of exposure assessment are concerned with human health, making it an important tool in public health. (wikipedia.org)
  • Exposure assessment is the process of estimating or measuring the magnitude, frequency and duration of exposure to an agent, along with the number and characteristics of the population exposed. (wikipedia.org)
  • formal
  • A core part of neuropsychological assessment is the administration of neuropsychological tests for the formal assessment of cognitive function, though neuropsychological testing is more than the administration and scoring of tests and screening tools. (wikipedia.org)
  • hazards
  • This guidance enables employees to make a suitable and sufficient assessment of significant hazards associated with their work activities. (bath.ac.uk)
  • protective
  • The goal of a thorough risk assessment is to learn about the circumstances of an individual person with regard to suicide, including warning signs, risk factors, and protective factors. (wikipedia.org)
  • Evidence
  • Evidence does not support routine health assessments in otherwise healthy people. (wikipedia.org)
  • Subsequently, however, Black and Wiliam have suggested this definition is too restrictive, since formative assessments may be used to provide evidence that the intended course of action was indeed appropriate. (wikipedia.org)
  • Medico-legal assessment, to be used in a court of law as evidence in a legal claim or criminal investigation. (wikipedia.org)
  • See the Assessment section of the Voice Disorders evidence map for pertinent scientific evidence, expert opinion, and client/caregiver perspective. (asha.org)
  • health
  • The Breast Cancer Risk Assessment Tool allows health professionals to estimate a woman's risk of developing invasive breast cancer over the next 5 years and up to age 90 (lifetime risk). (cancer.gov)
  • Despite the test's uncertainty, mental health professionals have used the Abel Assessment to civilly commit sex offenders. (wikipedia.org)
  • Health risk assessment" includes variations, such as the type and severity of response, with or without a probabilistic context. (wikipedia.org)
  • collaboration
  • Positive assessment culture generally connotes the existence of conditions for collaboration among practitioners, reward structures and professional development opportunities for faculty and staff, student involvement and a shared commitment among leaders to making institutional improvements that are sustainable. (wikipedia.org)