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  • spinal acces
  • For example, during a functional neck dissection that injures the spinal accessory nerve, injury prompts the surgeon to cautiously preserve branches of C2, C3, and C4 spinal nerves that provide supplemental innervation to the trapezius muscle. (wikipedia.org)
  • outcomes
  • Secondary outcomes measured will include nerve conduction studies (NCS) and electromyographic (EMG) studies, as well as scores on the Oxford Shoulder Score (OSS), the Neck Dissection Impairment Index (NDII), and the University of Washington Quality of Life (UW-QOL) score. (biomedcentral.com)
  • The objective of this study is to evaluate the effect of BES on postoperative clinical and objective shoulder functional outcomes and pain after oncologic neck dissection. (biomedcentral.com)
  • The purpose of this study was to evaluate neck control outcomes after definitive radiochemotherapy without planned neck dissection in node-positive head and neck cancer. (biomedcentral.com)
  • nerve
  • Traumatic neuroma, an attempt by an injured nerve to regenerate, may present as a palpable nodule or an area sensitive to touch (trigger point) after neck dissection. (ajnr.org)
  • Traumatic neuromas may arise from the great auricular nerve (C2, C4), the cutaneous cervical nerves (C2, C3), the supraclavicular nerve (C3, C4), and the superficial branches of the cervical plexus transected during radical neck dissection (5) . (ajnr.org)
  • Close et al (9) state that excision is unnecessary for patients with prior neck dissection and traumatic neuromas in typical locations posterior to the carotid artery near the second cervical nerve. (ajnr.org)
  • Nerve damage can cause numbness (temporary or permanent) in different regions on the neck and create loss of function (temporary or permanent).The more extensive the neck dissection, the more function the patient is likely to lose. (cedars-sinai.org)
  • Nerve damage can result in numbness (either temporary or permanent) to different regions on the neck and loss of function (temporary or permanent) to parts of the neck, throat, and shoulder. (blogspot.com)
  • The sternocleidomastoid muscle was unwrapped at its fascial attachment and this was taken back posterior to the XI cranial nerve into the superior posterior most triangle of the neck. (medicaltranscriptionsamples.com)
  • This was carried forward off of the deep rooted muscles including the splenius capitis and anterior and middle scalenes taken medially off of these muscles including the fascia of the muscles, stripped from the carotid artery, the X cranial nerve, the internal jugular vein and then carried anteriorly to the lateral most extent of the dissection previously done by Dr. X in the paratracheal region. (medicaltranscriptionsamples.com)
  • prognostic
  • We investigated the patterns of failure, neck control rate, and prognostic factors for regional control to evaluate the clinical outcome of our treatment policy. (biomedcentral.com)
  • Head
  • The muscle on the side of the neck that helps you turn your head. (mskcc.org)
  • We are unaware of prior radiologic descriptions of traumatic neuromas in the head and neck. (ajnr.org)
  • Head and Neck Disease Management Group. (clinicaltrials.gov)
  • This book should be in the library of everyone interested in neoplasia, particularly surgeons treating neoplasia about the head and neck. (jamanetwork.com)
  • Primary neoplasms of the soft tissue in the head and neck are rare. (mhmedical.com)
  • All available clinical information may be used in staging: physical exam, radiographic, intraoperative, and pathologic findings, Other than histopathologic analysis, biomarkers and molecular studies are not yet included in the staging of head and neck cancers. (blogspot.com)
  • pathologic
  • CT was performed 1.5 to 6 years after neck dissection with clinical correlation and/or pathologic examination. (ajnr.org)
  • A review of the computerized medical records at the University of Pittsburgh Medical Center from April 1995 to November 1998 revealed four patients (three men and one woman, 45-64 years old) who had undergone radical neck dissection in whom contrast-enhanced CT studies of the neck revealed a nodule in the expected location of a traumatic neuroma, and in whom clinical correlation, pathologic proof, or comparison CT studies were available. (ajnr.org)
  • The remaining two patients who received neck dissection had negative pathologic results. (biomedcentral.com)