Loading...
  • 20th century
  • While anti-Asian racism was embedded in U.S. politics and culture in the early 20th century, Indians were also racialized for their anticolonialism, with U.S. officials, casting them as a "Hindu" menace, pushing for Western imperial expansion abroad. (wikipedia.org)
  • Carolina
  • This stunned and floored me, we have artifacts that predate modern civilization by about 4,000 years here in the USA, and in North Carolina no less! (abovetopsecret.com)
  • Mark R. Plane is a Ph.D. candidate in the Department of Anthropology at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. (ua.edu)
  • origin
  • A thorough examination of artifacts used by Native Americans, whether of Euro-American or Native origin, this volume provides a clear view of the realities of the economic and social interactions between Native groups and the expanding Euro-American population and the engagement of these Native groups in determining their own fate. (ua.edu)
  • In the present study we show, by using mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) polymorphism, major participation of matrilineages of taurus origin in the American Zebu purebred origin, i.e., 79, 73 and 100% for the Nellore, Gyr and Brahman breeds, respectively. (scielo.br)
  • These results suggest that a large proportion of American Zebu matrilineages were derived by backcrossing 'native' females of taurine B. taurus origin to bulls imported from the Indian continent carrying B. indicus mitochondrial genotypes. (scielo.br)
  • Slavery
  • The American Civil War, while primarily fought over the issue of slavery, also restored the Union by settling the issues of nullification and secession and strengthened the role of the Federal government. (dymocks.com.au)
  • The end of the slave trade and the decline of slavery in the North did not break these ties. (democracynow.org)
  • Salvador
  • and (3) all New World events as recorded in the Book of Mormon took place in the geographic area of Mesoamerica (from Mexico City on the north to the western borders of Honduras and El Salvador on the south). (bmaf.org)
  • Siberia
  • They were long presumed to be American Indians from Siberia, but recent research by anthropologists have revealed many similarities with the big game hunters of Western Europe. (accessgenealogy.com)
  • The traditional theory held that the first Americans crossed the land bridge from Siberia to Alaska around 11,500 years ago and followed an 'ice-free corridor' between two large Canadian ice sheets (the Laurentide and Cordilleran) to reach unglaciated lands to the south. (meta-religion.com)
  • A coastal migration route is now gaining more acceptance, rather than the older view of small bands moving on foot across the middle of the land bridge between Siberia and Alaska and into the continents. (meta-religion.com)
  • struggle
  • The last quarter of the 18th century was a period of extensive political, economic, and social change in North America, as the continent-wide struggle between European superpowers waned. (ua.edu)
  • world's
  • Over the past decade, from British Columbia to New Mexico, the world's most rapid deforestation has been underway in the North American west, with an average of nearly six million acres of forest lost per year - roughly double the three million acres per year rate in Brazil. (blogspot.com)
  • Immigration
  • More than just creating an ethnic cauldron of arguably incompatible cultures which may boil over into violence one day, the U.S. 1965 Immigration Act has seriously eroded the quality of the American labor force. (truthinmedia.org)
  • Indian immigration began in the mid-19th century, with more than two thousand Indian Sikhs living in the United States, primarily on the West Coast, by the end of the century. (wikipedia.org)
  • Plains
  • A Hidden America, Children of the Plains. (tahtonka.com)
  • Against anyone's expectations, including his own, Randy has become the face of local resistance to the Keystone XL pipeline, the massive project aimed at bringing oil from the tar-sands moonscape of Alberta, down through the heart of the American plains, to refineries on the Gulf coast of Texas. (readersupportednews.org)
  • Diversity
  • Illustrating the diversity of Native adaptations in an increasingly hostile and marginalized world, this volume is continental in scope-ranging from Connecticut to the Carolinas, and westward through Texas and Colorado. (ua.edu)
  • Nations
  • Later, Native Americans in Canada began to refer to themselves as First Nations. (britannica.com)
  • American surveyors set up their own astronomical station nearby, and the two nations thus here divided the landscape along the forty-ninth parallel after the Napoleonic wars. (utne.com)
  • world
  • It is also located right next to Asia it is one of the biggest continents in the world where is Europe located? (answers.com)
  • So extensive were the cumulative effects of these modifications that it may be said that the general consequence of the Indian occupation of the New World was to replace forested land with grassland or savannah, or, where the forest persisted, to open it up and free it from underbrush. (blogspot.com)
  • Because such a stupefied population is easier to subjugate by the elite's financial shackles than would be the free-spirited, free-thinking, patriotic, enterprising Americans who had made this country the envy of the world. (truthinmedia.org)
  • descendants
  • These results indicate that not only that Kennewick Man was a Native American, but that his mostly likely descendants include the members of the Colville tribe , living today less than 200 miles from the Kennewick burial site. (theconversation.com)
  • once
  • The Book of Mormon claims to be an ancient record containing a summary of a now-disappeared civilization that once lived in the American continent but originated in the Middle East. (bmaf.org)
  • If I were an Indian," Custer once mused, while criticizing "the confined limits" of reservations and "the blessed benefits of civilization, with its vices thrown in. (counterpunch.org)
  • to say 'I told you so' to non Natives once again. (tahtonka.com)
  • In the East, Southwest, and Northwest Coast, Indians lived in villages that stayed in the same place for years, moving only to plant new fields once the old ones wore out. (encyclopedia.com)
  • source
  • This remains an excellent source for news from all around American Native Country. (tahtonka.com)
  • Southerton's work was later used as a source for a 2006 article written by William Lobdell and published in the Los Angeles Times , which stated: "For Mormons, the lack of discernible Hebrew blood in Native Americans is no minor collision between faith and science. (wikipedia.org)
  • Plant
  • Plant foods undoubtedly contributed to the Paleo-Indian diet, although the periglacial environment would have narrowed their quantities and varieties to some extent. (britannica.com)
  • Cold-adapted plant species such as birch and spruce retreated to the mountains and the far north, replaced in lower altitudes and latitudes by heat- and drought-resistant species including grasses, forbs, and hardwood trees. (britannica.com)
  • distinctive
  • One of the most distinctive Paleo-Indian artifact types is the Clovis point , the first of which was discovered on a kill site near what is now Clovis, New Mexico . (britannica.com)
  • found
  • The Indians found uses for such native American plants as rubber, tobacco, the sugar maple, and the cinchona tree (for quinine). (britannica.com)
  • To test penicillin's effectiveness in treating syphilis and other STDs, researchers led by Dr. John Charles Cutler from the United States (funded by the Public Health Services, the Pan American Health Sanitary Bureau, and the National Institutes of Health) headed to Guatemala in 1946 and found prostitutes who had syphilis, getting them to then give it to unsuspecting Guatemalan soldiers, mental health patients, and prisoners. (todayifoundout.com)
  • Native groups found themselves enmeshed in the market economy and new state forms of control, among other new threats to their cultural survival. (ua.edu)
  • After years of legal wrangling, the Ninth District court concluded in 2005 that Kennewick Man was not a Native American and found in favour of the plaintiffs, permitting scientific study and awarding more than US$2m in attorney's fees and costs to the plaintiffs. (theconversation.com)
  • Canada
  • In "The Spine of the Continent," author Mary Ellen Hannibal travels the length of the Spine, an area that describes the Rocky Mountains all the way from Canada down through Mexico. (utne.com)
  • years
  • from approximately 30,000-12,000 years ago, sea levels were so low that a " land bridge " connecting the two continents was exposed. (britannica.com)
  • Millions of years have probably elapsed since the cooling of the outer crust of the globe produced the solid basis of our continents. (wikisource.org)
  • Horses evolved on the North American continent over 50,000,000 years ago and they are as much a part of the land as we are. (change.org)
  • The handful of human skeletons dated over 8,000 years ago show some regional variation, but as a group their skulls differ markedly from the broad faces, prominent cheekbones, and round cranial vaults that characterize modern-day American Indians. (meta-religion.com)
  • Only one early specimen, Wizards Beach Man, a Nevada skeleton dated to 9,200 years ago, falls within the range of variability of contemporary American Indians, an exception that requires further scientific validation. (meta-religion.com)
  • Atlantic
  • Europe is not an island nor a country but a continent which is located Eastward from the U.S. is divided by the North Atlantic ocean. (answers.com)
  • The territory now occupied or claimed by the American Union spreads from the shores of the Atlantic to those of the Pacific Ocean. (gradesaver.com)
  • areas
  • The South American climate varies greatly based on the distance from the equator and the altitude of the area, but the range of temperatures seldom reaches 36 ° F (20 ° C), except in small areas. (encyclopedia.com)
  • During the coldest periods of the Ice Age, the Gulf Coast region would have been one of the few areas of North America that could be comfortably inhabited by homo sapiens . (accessgenealogy.com)
  • But even in the areas where gardens produced abundantly, natives relied to some degree on hunting, gathering, and fishing. (encyclopedia.com)
  • Lyons Press, 2012) introduces readers to the most ambitious conservation effort ever undertaken: to create linked protected areas extending from the Yukon to Mexico, the entire length of North America. (utne.com)