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  • Nanoscale
  • The Nanomedicine Initiative applies an engineering approach to the study of cellular and subcellular systems in an effort not only to understand, but to precisely control, molecular complexes that operate at the nanoscale, institute officials said. (phys.org)
  • Therapeutic
  • Properly designed nanocarrier-based therapeutic agents (or nanomedicines) offer new possibilities of penetrating CSC niches and significantly increasing therapeutic drug accumulation in CSCs, which are difficult for free drug counterparts. (nih.gov)
  • A perspective on innovative therapeutic strategies and the potential direction of nanomedicine-based CSC therapy in the near future is also presented. (nih.gov)
  • Over the past 40 years, investigation of the therapeutic abilities of drug-loaded nanocarriers has become a flourishing research field, leading to the emergence, as nanosized drug delivery systems reached the market, of the term nanomedicine. (springer.com)
  • The book defines nanomedicine in a broad sense, including diagnostic devices such as DNA sequencing and molecular imaging, and new therapeutic options based on targeted drug delivery, regenerative medicine, immunotherapeutics, the creation of implanted devices such as continuous glucose monitors and deep brain stimulators, and even the 3D printing of new human organs. (routledge.com)
  • Nanomedicine employs converging technologies to improve human health, and nanoparticles (NPs) exhibit diagnostic and therapeutic moieties for site-specific targeting. (etp-nanomedicine.eu)
  • organs
  • The future of nanomedicines is drifting more towards novel multifunctional nanomedicines that will be designed as new generations of drug-delivery systems to target specific organelles, specific organs, or specific tissues. (sbwire.com)
  • particles
  • Nanomedicines consist of biodegradable or biocompatible submicron-sized colloidal particles encapsulating a drug. (springer.com)
  • Researchers at Purdue University have discovered a possible new pathway for anti-tumor drugs to kill cancer cells and proposed how to improve the design of tiny drug-delivery particles for use in "nanomedicine. (purdue.edu)
  • research
  • SINTEF Industry has a strong operation in the fields of microbial molecular biology, bioprocess- and medical technology, biopolymers/polymers, biopharmaceuticals and nanomedicine, and is operating a state-of-the-art research infrastructure including advanced mass spectrometry. (sintef.no)
  • Nanomedicine publishes basic, clinical, and engineering research in the innovative field of nanomedicine. (nsti.org)
  • Nanomedicine will provide the latest information in this rapidly developing field, both in research and clinical applications. (nsti.org)
  • Initiatives to improve the existing drug efficacy based on increasing research activities and coupled with growing acceptance and government support are considered to be some of the vital driving factors in the nanomedicine market. (sbwire.com)
  • Nanomedicine technology could enhance the administration and availability of drug treatment for HIV, according to new research conducted by the University of Liverpool. (medindia.net)
  • By covering the science, business, and societal impact of nanomedicine, this book makes a strong case for funding of basic research, for effective translation of scientific breakthroughs into clinical care of patients, and for close collaboration among all stakeholders in the healthcare ecosystem. (routledge.com)
  • Promise
  • In addition, intelligent nanomedicine holds great promise to overcome pump-mediated multidrug resistance which is driven by ATP and to decrease detrimental effects on normal somatic stem cells. (nih.gov)
  • It covers the underlying science and technology of nanomedicine in detail to help understand the great promise of nanomedicine across all disease areas. (routledge.com)
  • Targeting cancer cells for destruction while leaving healthy cells alone-that has been the promise of the emerging field of cancer nanomedicine. (phys.org)
  • 2019
  • As the nanomedicine market continues to grow over the forecast 2013 - 2019, it is expected to have a remarkable impact on the global economy. (sbwire.com)
  • field
  • The different pillars of the Nanomedicine field are also highlighted. (springer.com)
  • In The Handbook of Nanomedicine, Third Edition , Prof. Kewal K. Jain updates, reorganizes, and replaces information in the comprehensive second edition in order to capture the most recent advances in this dynamic field. (springer.com)
  • In depth and cutting-edge, The Handbook of Nanomedicine, Third Edition informs its readers of the ever-growing field of nanomedicine, destined to play a significant role in the future of healthcare. (springer.com)
  • CIDETEC has a multidisciplinary team who are experts in the transfer of technology in the field of nanomedicine and biomaterials from the laboratory scale to the first clinical batches. (cidetec.es)
  • scientists
  • The Liverpool University team of scientists explored the possibility of using the nanomedicine approach to enlarge upon the options currently available for treating HIV patients. (medindia.net)
  • Nanomedicine: Science, Business , and Impact will appeal to a wide range of readers, including scientists, investors, politicians-in short, anyone interested in the impact that emerging nanotechnologies will have on the practice of medicine. (routledge.com)
  • novel
  • Nanomedicine technology has emerged following pioneering work in the 1970s and has given rise to an enormous number of novel delivery systems and applications. (springer.com)
  • possibilities
  • This maintains the integrity of the protein so that the drug is more effective, opening up possibilities for the development of nanomedicine. (phys.org)
  • advances
  • Advances in chemistry and engineering have yielded a large panel of biocompatible and biodegradable materials from which nanomedicines can be made. (springer.com)
  • Recent advances in formulation, material science and physical chemistry have led to the emergence of a broad range of nanomedicines of various sizes, architectures and surface properties and made from very diverse materials. (springer.com)
  • routes
  • Although mostly conceived for intravenous administration, nanomedicines hold potential for delivery by other routes, such as the oral, ocular and pulmonary routes, which we examine. (springer.com)
  • Alternative routes of administration are then presented, followed by new trends in nanomedicine technology: stimuli-responsive systems and nanotheranostics. (springer.com)
  • drug
  • This is an interesting new step in developing nanomedicine techniques in drug delivery," he said. (purdue.edu)
  • This method might help to design nanomedicines that do not need extensive chemical modification of a protein drug or a nano-carrier and therefore can be developed more easily and faster. (phys.org)
  • market
  • Nanomedicine market is already starting to realize its potential in Life Science and Healthcare industries, especially in clinical practice. (sbwire.com)
  • The nanomedicine market also helps to gain an increased understanding of intricate and underlying patho-physiology of disease. (sbwire.com)
  • Worldwide, there are approximately 38 medicine products and 200 companies involved in the nanomedicine market. (sbwire.com)
  • Within the nanomedicine market, the most leading application segment was that of oncology in 2012, holding a 38% share of the global market. (sbwire.com)
  • overcome
  • In this short review, we first present the different types of materials from which nanomedicines are made, before focusing on physiological barriers encountered by nanomedicines after their intravenous administration and how these barriers can be overcome. (springer.com)