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  • ISSN
  • The journal ceased publication at the end of 2000, but was revived when starting in 2003 it absorbed Molecular Diversity Preservation International's Journal of Molecular Diversity (ISSN 1424-7917). (wikipedia.org)
  • Enzymology
  • Molecular Enzymology and Drug Targets journal aims is to publish the work of designing and synthesis of enzymes and high unmet medical need are based on innovative drug targets. (com.es)
  • Therefore, the journal Molecular Enzymology and Drug Targets will be unique in its discipline as it can be the first interest to authors working in the field of enzymology and related subjects. (com.es)
  • Preliminary studies are inappropriate for publishing in Journal of Molecular enzymology and Drug Targets, unless the authors report the significance of their findings, in that case, the manuscript can be accepted. (com.es)
  • molecule
  • Molecular encapsulation in supramolecular chemistry is the confinement of a guest molecule inside the cavity of a supramolecular host molecule (molecular capsule, molecular container or cage compounds). (wikipedia.org)
  • A molecular vibration occurs when atoms in a molecule are in periodic motion while the molecule as a whole has constant translational and rotational motion. (wikipedia.org)
  • In general, a molecule with N atoms has 3N - 6 normal modes of vibration, but a linear molecule has 3N - 5 such modes, because rotation about its molecular axis cannot be observed. (wikipedia.org)
  • A molecular vibration is excited when the molecule absorbs a quantum of energy, E, corresponding to the vibration's frequency, ν, according to the relation E = hν (where h is Planck's constant). (wikipedia.org)
  • For a linear molecule, rotation about the molecular axis does not involve movement of any atomic nucleus, so there are only 2 rotational degrees of freedom which can vary the atomic coordinates. (wikipedia.org)
  • An equivalent argument is that the rotation of a linear molecule changes the direction of the molecular axis in space, which can be described by 2 coordinates corresponding to latitude and longitude. (wikipedia.org)
  • Single molecule electronics is an emerging field, and entire electronic circuits consisting exclusively of molecular sized compounds are still very far from being realized. (wikipedia.org)
  • One of the biggest hindrances for single molecule electronics to be commercially exploited is the lack of means to connect a molecular sized circuit to bulk electrodes in a way that gives reproducible results. (wikipedia.org)
  • Molecular binding occurs in biological complexes (e.g., between pairs or sets of proteins, or between a protein and a small molecule ligand it binds) and also in abiologic chemical systems, e.g. as in cases of coordination polymers and coordination networks such as metal-organic frameworks. (wikipedia.org)
  • Protein
  • NEW YORK (GenomeWeb) - Indi Molecular this week announced a co-development deal with Sigma-Aldrich to explore use of its PCC (protein catalyzed capture) agent technology in Sigma-Aldrich's line of protein research reagents. (genomeweb.com)
  • Potassium channels were first identified by manipulating molecular genetics (of the flies) instead of performing channel protein purification because there were no known high-affinity ligands for potassium channels (such as TEA) at the time of discovery. (wikipedia.org)
  • genetic
  • It is a scientific discipline that encompasses the development of molecular and genetic approaches to the diagnosis and classification of human diseases, the design and validation of predictive biomarkers for treatment response and disease progression, the susceptibility of individuals of different genetic constitution to develop disorders. (wikipedia.org)
  • Molecular drive operates independently of natural selection and genetic drift. (wikipedia.org)
  • Molecular Ecology is a twice monthly scientific journal covering investigations that use molecular genetic techniques to address questions in ecology, evolution, behavior, and conservation. (wikipedia.org)
  • Pathology
  • For the journal, see Molecular Pathology . (wikipedia.org)
  • A key consideration is that more accurate diagnosis is possible when the diagnosis is based on both the morphologic changes in tissues (traditional anatomic pathology) and on molecular testing. (wikipedia.org)
  • Molecular pathology is commonly used in diagnosis of cancer and infectious diseases. (wikipedia.org)
  • experimental
  • Papers based on few taxa, single molecular markers, or that use codon-based methods to test for positive Darwinian selection, but in the absence of experimental evidence that allegedly selected amino acid changes cause an adaptive phenotypic effect, will not be accepted. (elsevier.com)
  • Molecular database without transition elements These files were made with the atom's coordinates to respect the experimental values. (nyu.edu)
  • organism
  • Produced idea of comparing fossil amino acid sequences with existing organism so that molecular evolution could be studied. (wikipedia.org)
  • According to Dover, Adoptation is an evolved feature of an organism that contributes to its viability and reproduction (established by molecular drive) and that adopts some previously inaccessible component of the environment. (wikipedia.org)
  • In a conventional molecular cloning experiment, the DNA to be cloned is obtained from an organism of interest, then treated with enzymes in the test tube to generate smaller DNA fragments. (wikipedia.org)
  • Therefore, if any segment of DNA from any organism is inserted into a DNA segment containing the molecular sequences required for DNA replication, and the resulting recombinant DNA is introduced into the organism from which the replication sequences were obtained, then the foreign DNA will be replicated along with the host cell's DNA in the transgenic organism. (wikipedia.org)
  • In standard molecular cloning experiments, the cloning of any DNA fragment essentially involves seven steps: (1) Choice of host organism and cloning vector, (2) Preparation of vector DNA, (3) Preparation of DNA to be cloned, (4) Creation of recombinant DNA, (5) Introduction of recombinant DNA into host organism, (6) Selection of organisms containing recombinant DNA, (7) Screening for clones with desired DNA inserts and biological properties. (wikipedia.org)
  • organisms
  • The study of living things at the molecular level has undergone tremendous expansion in recent years, leading to ever-increasing insights into topics as various as the origin of life, the nature of disease and the development of individual organisms. (ox.ac.uk)
  • By applying molecular analytical techniques to DNA in fossils, one can quantify the level of relatedness between any two organisms for which DNA has been recovered. (wikipedia.org)
  • Molecular cloning generally uses DNA sequences from two different organisms: the species that is the source of the DNA to be cloned, and the species that will serve as the living host for replication of the recombinant DNA. (wikipedia.org)
  • Molecular cloning takes advantage of the fact that the chemical structure of DNA is fundamentally the same in all living organisms. (wikipedia.org)
  • structures
  • To make science fun and easier to understand, the Springfield (Mass.) Science Museum has partnered with UMass Amherst in installing a Molecular Playground, a campus-designed interactive display that introduces visitors to the beauty of molecular structures. (umass.edu)
  • We want the Molecular Playground to attract and entertain a broad audience while visually exposing them to some of the concepts that underlie molecular structures at all levels. (umass.edu)
  • methods
  • Methods for regeneration of molecular sieves include pressure change (as in oxygen concentrators), heating and purging with a carrier gas (as when used in ethanol dehydration), or heating under high vacuum. (wikipedia.org)
  • This changed dramatically with the advent of molecular cloning methods. (wikipedia.org)
  • The fundamental difference between the two methods is that molecular cloning involves replication of the DNA in a living microorganism, while PCR replicates DNA in an in vitro solution, free of living cells. (wikipedia.org)
  • commonly
  • A sealed canister, commonly filled with silica gel and other molecular sieves used as desiccant in drug containers to keep contents dry. (wikipedia.org)
  • techniques
  • Techniques are numerous but include quantitative polymerase chain reaction ( qPCR ), multiplex PCR , DNA microarray , in situ hybridization , in situ RNA sequencing , DNA sequencing , antibody based immunofluorescence tissue assays, molecular profiling of pathogens, and analysis of bacterial genes for antimicrobial resistance . (wikipedia.org)
  • Molecular ecological techniques have recently been used to study in situ questions of bacterial diversity. (wikipedia.org)
  • Targets
  • Coverage addresses the generation of molecular diversity, application of diversity for screening against alternative targets of all types, and the analysis of results and their applications. (wikipedia.org)
  • include
  • Other molecular sieves are used as desiccants (some examples include activated charcoal and silica gel ). (wikipedia.org)
  • These include molecular-sized gaps called break junctions, in which a thin electrode is stretched until it breaks. (wikipedia.org)
  • Search
  • Its search engine allows you to find a chemical by its molecular formula, IUPAC name, Smiles, common name, CAS number, structure or substructure. (nyu.edu)
  • level
  • To date all regulatory regions (promoters) and genes, that have been examined in detail at the molecular level, have TRAM characteristics. (wikipedia.org)
  • Due to the prospect of size reduction in electronics offered by molecular-level control of properties, molecular electronics has generated much excitement. (wikipedia.org)
  • Study
  • This is another phylogenetic study where relationships are being better resolved by the vastly greater number of character traits that can be tracked by using markers provided in some way by molecular genetics to resolve relationships where the limited number and traditional anatomical, biochemical, and physiological traits are uninformative (too few traits spread too far to sufficiently resolve differences). (physicsforums.com)
  • The study of molecular paleontology is said to have begun with the discovery by Abelson of 360 million year old amino acids preserved in fossil shells. (wikipedia.org)
  • Molecular electronics is the study and application of molecular building blocks for the fabrication of electronic components. (wikipedia.org)
  • components
  • The unifying feature is use of molecular building blocks to fabricate electronic components. (wikipedia.org)
  • The result of molecular binding is sometimes the formation of a molecular complex in which the attractive forces holding the components together are generally non-covalent, and thus are normally energetically weaker than covalent bonds. (wikipedia.org)
  • The strength of binding between the components of molecular complex is measured quantitatively by the binding constant (KA), defined as the ratio of the concentration of the complex divided by the product of the concentrations of the isolated components at equilibrium in molar units. (wikipedia.org)
  • research
  • Despite the deal, though, Indi Molecular has shifted its focus from developing PCCs as research and diagnostic tools to therapeutics, CEO Albert Luderer told GenomeWeb. (genomeweb.com)
  • Molecular Pain is a peer-reviewed open access medical journal covering all aspects of research on pain. (wikipedia.org)
  • Molecular Diversity is a quarterly peer-reviewed scientific journal published by Springer Science+Business Media covering research on molecular diversity and combinatorial chemistry in basic and applied research and drug discovery. (wikipedia.org)
  • Chemistry
  • The Molecular Playgrounds are the brainchild of Professor Craig T. Martin , head of UMass Amherst's Department of Chemistry . (umass.edu)
  • Molecular BioSystems is a monthly peer-reviewed scientific journal published by the Royal Society of Chemistry. (wikipedia.org)
  • application
  • In such applications, air is supplied by an air compressor and is passed through a cartridge filter which, depending on the application, is filled with molecular sieve and/or activated carbon , finally being used to charge breathing air tanks. (wikipedia.org)
  • field
  • Ogino S, Stampfer M. Lifestyle factors and microsatellite instability in colorectal cancer: The evolving field of molecular pathological epidemiology. (wikipedia.org)
  • Ogino S, Chan AT, Fuchs CS, Giovannucci E. Molecular pathological epidemiology of colorectal neoplasia: an emerging transdisciplinary and interdisciplinary field. (wikipedia.org)
  • However, Svante Pääbo is often the one considered to be the founder of the field of molecular paleontology. (wikipedia.org)
  • The field of molecular paleontology has had several major advances since the 1950s and is a continuously growing field. (wikipedia.org)