Loading...
  • apheresis
  • On day 5, daily apheresis started and was continued for up to 4 days, or until ≥ 5 × 10 6 CD34+ cells/kg was collected. (springer.com)
  • Transplant
  • Bone Marrow Transplant. (springer.com)
  • 1 - 4 However, the main disadvantage of CBT is still the limited cell dose, especially in adults, and this might contribute to a higher incidence of graft failure and delayed hematopoietic recovery, leading to higher transplant-related mortality (TRM) or overall mortality after CBT. (haematologica.org)
  • myeloid
  • l , Nes -GFP + cells (green) and cobblestone-forming area (dashed line) in 4-week primary myeloid culture. (nih.gov)
  • Activating mutations in this gene are associated with gastrointestinal stromal tumors, testicular seminoma, mast cell disease, melanoma, acute myeloid leukemia, while inactivating mutations are associated with the genetic defect piebaldism. (wikipedia.org)
  • While some other authors have contested these, and maintained that they are true EPCs, many investigators have begun to term these cells colony forming unit-Hill cells (CFU-Hill) or circulating angiogenic cells (CAC) instead (depending on the method of isolation), highlighting their role as hematopoietic myeloid cells involved in promoting new vessel growth. (wikipedia.org)
  • viable
  • We therefore considered a strategy that would provide a robust source of viable ECs to supplement EC mobilization from preexisting blood vessels, according to the classic paradigm of angiogenesis developed by Folkman and colleagues ( 13 ). (pnas.org)
  • Efficacy
  • And we can demonstrate that the CXCR4 antagonist AMD3100 mobilise placenta derived CD34+ cells ex utero already after 30 min of incubation and may further enhance the efficacy of harvesting placenta-derived HSC. (docplayer.net)
  • microenvironment
  • This novel paradigm will enable us to examine the effects on neurogenesis by a nonpermissive stem cell microenvironment likely produced by lack of exercise. (cognizantcommunication.com)
  • Stem-cell niche refers to a microenvironment, within the specific anatomic location where stem cells are found, which interacts with stem cells to regulate cell fate. (wikipedia.org)
  • Muse cells are shown to home into the damage site and spontaneously differentiate into tissue-compatible cells according to the microenvironment to contribute to tissue regeneration when infused into the blood stream. (wikipedia.org)
  • niche
  • A niche is a subgroup of tissue cells and extracellular substrates that can indefinitely harbor one or more stem cells and control their self-renewal and progeny in vivo [ 3 ]. (hindawi.com)
  • And human placenta is a potent hematopoietic niche containing hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells throughout development 5. (docplayer.net)
  • The cellular constituents forming the haematopoietic stem cell (HSC) niche in the bone marrow are unclear, with studies implicating osteoblasts, endothelial and perivascular cells. (nih.gov)
  • These results uncover an unprecedented partnership between two distinct somatic stem-cell types and are indicative of a unique niche in the bone marrow made of heterotypic stem-cell pairs. (nih.gov)
  • The stem cells and niche may induce each other during development and reciprocally signal to maintain each other during adulthood. (wikipedia.org)
  • citation needed] A Nature Insight review defines niche as follows: "Stem-cell populations are established in 'niches' - specific anatomic locations that regulate how they participate in tissue generation, maintenance and repair. (wikipedia.org)
  • Yet the niche may also induce pathologies by imposing aberrant function on stem cells or other targets. (wikipedia.org)
  • The simple location of stem cells is not sufficient to define a niche. (wikipedia.org)
  • Though the concept of stem cell niche was prevailing in vertebrates, the first characterization of stem cell niche in vivo was worked out in Drosophila germinal development. (wikipedia.org)
  • By continuous intravital imaging in mice, researchers were able to explore the structure of the stem cell niche and to obtain the fate of individual stem cells (SCs) and their progeny over time in vivo. (wikipedia.org)
  • In particular in intestinal crypt, two distinct groups of SCs have been identified: the "border stem cells" located in the upper part of the niche at the interface with transit amplifying cells (TAs), and "central stem cells" located at the crypt base. (wikipedia.org)
  • This bi-compartmental structure of stem cell niche has been mathematically modeled to obtain the optimal architecture that leads to the maximum delay in double-hit mutant production. (wikipedia.org)
  • mast
  • In strains of plasmodium, FLT3L was shown to be released from mast cells and cause the expansion of dendritic cells, leading to the activation of CD8+ T cells. (wikipedia.org)
  • The same paper suggested that FLT3L release was caused by stimulation of mast cells with uric acid, produced from a precursor secreted by the plasmodium parasite. (wikipedia.org)
  • Mice with SCF or c-Kit mutations have severe defects in the production of mast cells, having less than 1% of the normal levels of mast cells. (wikipedia.org)
  • Conversely, the injection of SCF increases mast cell numbers near the site of injection by over 100 times. (wikipedia.org)
  • Mobilisation
  • 1 Mobilisation, Isolation and Coculture of Haematopoietic Stem Cells D i s s e r t a t i o n s s c h r i f t zur Erlangung eines doctor rerum medicinalium (Dr. rer. (docplayer.net)
  • The European Medicines Agency has listed a number of safety concerns to be evaluated on a post-marketing basis, most notably the theoretical possibilities of spleen rupture and tumor cell mobilisation. (wikipedia.org)
  • putative
  • Molecular genetic analysis of early outgrowth putative EPC populations suggests they do indeed have monocyte-like expression patterns, and support the existence of a separate population of progenitors, the late outgrowth, or endothelial colony forming cell (ECFC). (wikipedia.org)
  • involves
  • The process involves sucking out the nucleus of a somatic (body) cell and injecting it into an oocyte that has had its nucleus removed Using an approach based on the protocol outlined by Tachibana et al. (wikipedia.org)