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  • contrast
  • the E-T detector collects SE2 electrons and provide topographical information, the in-lens detector collects SE1 electrons and provide high resolution surface information, the EsB detector (which is an in lens detector) collects BS electrons at low voltages thus provide composition contrast for all samples including nonconductive or beam sensitive samples, the STEM detector collects transmitted electrons of thin samples (up to 100nm) at 30kV. (weizmann.ac.il)
  • the E-T detector collects SE2 electrons and provide topographical information, the in-lens detector collects SE1 electrons and provide high resolution surface information, the AsB detector collects BS electrons at voltages higher than 5kV and provide composition and channeling contrast, the CL detector collects photons that can be emitted as a result of electron-hole recombination in semiconductor samples, the EDS collects x-ray signals and provide elemental analysis. (weizmann.ac.il)
  • This allowed element analysis with EELS ( E lectron E nergy L oss S pectroscopy) and it produced images with high contrast using a slit aperture to eliminate inelastic scattered electrons. (uibk.ac.at)
  • EELS
  • The imaging of inelastically scattered electrons makes element analysis with EELS possible and shows the element distribution by using ESI ( E lectron S pectroscopic I maging). (uibk.ac.at)
  • lens
  • the new generation E-T detector can filter out SE3 electrons, thus it collects mainly SE2 electrons and provide topographical information, the in-lens Duo detector collects SE1 and BS electrons and provide high resolution surface information together with material information, the HD-AsB provides material and orientational information. (weizmann.ac.il)
  • produces
  • One of today's sharpest imaging tools, super-resolution microscopy, produces sparkling images of what until now has been the blurry interior of cells, detailing not only the cell's internal organs and skeleton, but also providing insights into cells' amazing flexibility. (news-medical.net)
  • Theory
  • When spiraling electron beams pass magnetic particles, in theory, their degree of rotation should change, depending on the strength of the magnetism. (scientificamerican.com)
  • researchers
  • The researchers ran computer simulations to work out the precise grid configuration that would cause the electron beam to split as it passed through the mask and recombine as a spiral on the other side. (scientificamerican.com)
  • Equipment
  • This was a very exciting piece of work, but even if you create a twisted electron beam one day, you can't easily go back and do it again the next day, using the same equipment,' he says. (scientificamerican.com)
  • energy
  • The collision scatters this electron inelastically and the energy loss of the electron is specific for the element. (uibk.ac.at)
  • A wide spectrum of electrons is emitted with energies between the energy of the illumination and the work function of the sample. (wikipedia.org)
  • TECHNIQUES
  • LMS also describes the electron optical tools and techniques currently available to analyze nanomaterial morphology, structure and chemistry. (lehigh.edu)