• Grete Kellenberger contributed to the development of new methods to prepare and analyse biological samples using an electron microscope, a new technique at the time. (wikipedia.org)
  • In physics, this technique is referred to as PEEM, which goes together naturally with low-energy electron diffraction (LEED), and low-energy electron microscopy (LEEM). (wikipedia.org)
  • PED possesses many advantageous attributes that make it well suited to investigating crystal structures via direct methods approaches: Quasi-kinematical diffraction patterns: While the underlying physics of the electron diffraction is still dynamical in nature, the conditions used to collect PED patterns minimize many of these effects. (wikipedia.org)
  • Interactions involving electrons with other subatomic particles are of interest in fields such as chemistry and nuclear physics. (wikipedia.org)
  • Sumio Iijima (2005) In Memory of the late Professor John M. Cowley, Microscopy Volume 54, Issue 3, Pp. 149 doi:10.1093/jmicro/dfi050 John M. Cowley (1975) Diffraction physics (North-Holland, Amsterdam) ISBN 0-444-10791-6 Ichinose, H. (wikipedia.org)
  • In solid-state physics, the work function (sometimes spelled workfunction) is the minimum thermodynamic work (i.e. energy) needed to remove an electron from a solid to a point in the vacuum immediately outside the solid surface. (wikipedia.org)
  • Dame Pratibha Laxman Gai, Mrs Gai-Boyes DBE FRS FRSC FREng is a British microscopist and Professor and Chair of Electron Microscopy and Director at The York JEOL Nanocentre, Departments of Chemistry and Physics, University of York. (wikipedia.org)
  • The production of backscattered electrons varies directly with the specimen's atomic number. (unl.edu)
  • The method dubbed "cryo-electron microscopy" (cryo-EM) allows "high-resolution structure determination of biomolecules in solution" at the atomic level. (theregister.co.uk)
  • Mott, N.F.: The scattering of fast electrons by atomic nuclei. (springer.com)
  • Feynman believed that if the electron microscope could be made powerful enough, then it would become possible to visualize the atomic structure of any and all chemical compounds, including DNA. (wikipedia.org)
  • He is also a world leader in the development and application of atomic-resolution electron microscopy and its use for the study of atomic defects in crystals and semiconductors. (wikipedia.org)
  • He has developed new microscopies and spectroscopies which have given scientists new eyes to understand atomic processes in solids. (wikipedia.org)
  • Ionization or differences in the proportions of negative electrons versus positive nuclei changes the binding energy of an atomic system. (wikipedia.org)
  • The atomic form factor depends on the type of scattering, which in turn depends on the nature of the incident radiation, typically X-ray, electron or neutron. (wikipedia.org)
  • Here "immediately" means that the final electron position is far from the surface on the atomic scale, but still too close to the solid to be influenced by ambient electric fields in the vacuum. (wikipedia.org)
  • In 2009, after years of development, Gai, who holds a chair in electron microscopy and is co-director of the York JEOL Nanocentre at the University of York, succeeded in creating a microscope capable of perceiving chemical reactions at the atomic scale. (wikipedia.org)
  • Whirling electron vortices could help materials scientists to map the properties of nanomaterials in new detail. (scientificamerican.com)
  • Advances in electron and X-ray microscopy have enabled new levels of spatial resolution and physicochemical sensitivity that allow scientists to, for instance, image strain in nanomaterials. (anl.gov)
  • The Electron and X-ray Microscopy Group, together with the CNM 's dynamic and diverse user community, makes use of the unique facilities located at the CNM to bring together two modalities with a single goal: to understand material structures, fundamental processes and excitations driving energy transport and interactions in complex nanomaterials. (anl.gov)