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  • show
  • Knockout mice show increased rates of oligodendrocyte precursor migration along the optic nerve and reduced rates of oligodendrocyte precursor proliferation in different regions of the CNS. (biologists.org)
  • C57Bl
  • For each mutant line, groups of seven male and seven female mice move through a standard analysis pipeline aimed at detecting traits that differ from healthy C57BL/6 mice. (wikipedia.org)
  • phenotypes
  • In a recent paper they comprehensively show that the sex of the mice influenced many phenotypes, highlighting the impact of sex differences in biomedicine and the need to account for those differences in all biomedical studies. (nih.gov)
  • Genome Informatics
  • These data are immediately shared among the scientific and medical research community through a bespoke open access database, and summaries are displayed in other online resources, including the Mouse Genome Informatics database and the Wikipedia-based Gene Wiki. (wikipedia.org)
  • genetic
  • Scientists from a wide range of biomedical fields have gravitated to the mouse because of its close genetic (approximately 95%) and physiological similarities to humans, as well as the ease with which its genome can be manipulated and analyzed. (avroarrow.org)
  • The Cftr knockout mouse: This particular strain has helped advance research into cystic fibrosis, the most common fatal genetic disease in the United States today, occurring in approximately one of every 3,300 live births. (avroarrow.org)
  • I ran across a paper with the genetic version of knockdown mice this morning. (biology-online.org)
  • In 1981 the laboratories of Frank Ruddle from Yale University, Frank Costantini and Elizabeth Lacy from Oxford, and Ralph Brinster and Richard Palmiter in collaboration from the University of Pennsylvania and the University of Washington injected purified DNA into a single-cell mouse embryo utilizing techniques developed by Brinster in the 1960s and 1970s, showing transmission of the genetic material to subsequent generations for the first time. (wikipedia.org)
  • roles
  • Over the past few years, multiple urea transporter knockout mouse models have been generated enabling us to explore the physiological roles of the different urea transporters. (frontiersin.org)
  • Disorders
  • Gene targeting has already produced more than five hundred different mouse models of human disorders, including cardiovascular and neuro-degenerative diseases, diabetes and cancer. (scienceblogs.com)
  • laboratory
  • Mice are currently the laboratory animal species most closely related to the humans for which the knockout technique can easily be applied. (wikipedia.org)
  • A laboratory mouse in which a gene affecting hair growth has been knocked out (left), is shown next to a normal lab mouse. (wikipedia.org)
  • Knockout mouse , genetically engineered laboratory mouse ( Mus musculus ) in which a specific gene has been inactivated, or "knocked out," by the introduction of a foreign (artificial) DNA sequence. (britannica.com)
  • At the forefront of this technology is The Jackson Laboratory, a publicly supported national repository for mouse models in Bar Harbor, Maine. (avroarrow.org)
  • Such mice were found to be 'smarter' than normal mice and were able to handle complex tasks more intelligently compared to 'normal' mice bred in the laboratory. (wikipedia.org)
  • normal mice
  • Usually, the new sequence is also given a marker gene , a gene that normal mice don't have and that confers resistance to a certain toxic agent (e.g., neomycin) or that produces an observable change (e.g. colour or fluorescence). (wikipedia.org)
  • They also found that the mice overfilled their bladders and took much longer to urinate than the normal mice. (redorbit.com)
  • humans
  • Furthermore, knocking out a gene may not produce any phenotypic change, and the changes observed in mouse models may be quite different from those observed in humans when the same gene is inactivated in both species. (britannica.com)
  • The resulting phenotypic change in the mouse can be used as an indicator for the gene's normal role in mouse and, by extrapolation, humans. (avroarrow.org)
  • mammals
  • Mice, therefore, are a far better tool for probing the immune, endocrine, nervous, cardiovascular, skeletal and other complex physiological systems that mammals share and the impact of these systems in the event of a disease. (avroarrow.org)
  • The conditional gene knockout method is often used to model human diseases in other mammals. (wikipedia.org)
  • IRGs have been described in various mammals but are most well characterized in mice. (wikipedia.org)
  • substance abuse
  • Examples of research in which knockout mice have been useful include studying and modeling different kinds of cancer , obesity , heart disease , diabetes , arthritis , substance abuse , anxiety , aging and Parkinson's disease . (wikipedia.org)
  • metabolic
  • Alcohol and aldehyde dehydrogenases: retinoid metabolic effects in mouse knockout models. (nih.gov)
  • Elucidation of the vitamin A metabolic pathway and investigation of the endogenous function of vitamin A metabolites has been greatly improved by development of mouse ADH, RDH, and RALDH loss-of-function models. (nih.gov)
  • Another mouse has had a gene altered that is involved in glucose metabolism and runs faster, lives longer, is more sexually active and eats more without getting fat than the average mouse (see Metabolic supermice). (wikipedia.org)
  • abnormalities
  • Since UT-B has a wide tissue distribution, multiple phenotypic abnormalities have been found in UT-B null mice, such as defective urine concentration, exacerbated heart blockage with aging, depression-like behavior, and earlier male sexual maturation. (frontiersin.org)
  • 1974
  • Rudolf Jaenisch created the first GM animal when he inserted foreign DNA into a mouse in 1974. (wikipedia.org)
  • sequences
  • Artificial DNA sequences typically are introduced into mouse ES cells using a retrovirus or other viral vector, and the modified ES cells are then grown in cell cultures . (britannica.com)
  • human
  • Considering the high concentration of urea in human (285 mmol/L), rat (700 mmol/L), and mouse (1800 mmol/L) urine, the amount of urea in the urine should inevitably cause osmotic diuresis in the renal collecting ducts. (frontiersin.org)
  • gene
  • FUNCTION: [Summary is not available for the mouse gene. (utsouthwestern.edu)
  • Note: UGB is itself progesterone induced gene in the endometrium in Lagomorphs) Inhibits phospholipase A2 in vitro Binds phosphatidylcholine, phosphatidylinositol Binds to fibronectin: The uteroglobulin knockout mice on the inbred C57Bl6 strain develop Goodpasture's syndrome like glomerulopathy due to fibronectin binding of IgA which might potentially be prevented by uteroglobin replacement. (wikipedia.org)
  • system
  • Using a previously established mouse ES-cell-based system that recapitulates the development of the ectoderm lineage we have identified a transient population that is consistent with definitive ectoderm. (biologists.org)