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  • Biological
  • Generally speaking, a biological pacemaker is one or more types of cellular components that, when "implanted or injected into certain regions of the heart," produce specific electrical stimuli that mimic that of the body's natural pacemaker cells. (wikipedia.org)
  • However, the implanted biological pacemaker cells still typically need to be supplemented with an artificial pacemaker while the cells form the necessary electrical connections with cardiac tissue. (wikipedia.org)
  • The first successful experiment with biological pacemakers was carried out by Arjang Ruhparwar's group at Hannover Medical School in Germany using transplanted fetal heart muscle cells. (wikipedia.org)
  • When they are no longer able to perform their purpose, interference of new cells and biological cues is provided by a scaffold material. (wikipedia.org)
  • myocardial infarction
  • The study was designed to investigate whether ultrasound-mediated microbubble destruction can enhance the transplantation of bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells (BMSCs) for myocardial infarction therapy, twenty myocardial infarction pigs were assigned into the ultrasound microbubble destruction group (n=12, Sonovue were infused into coronary artery with ultrasonic radiation, then BMSCs were injected into infarction region) and the cell control group (n=8, only subjected to BMSCs treatment). (omicsonline.org)
  • Our study first time testifies in pig models that ultrasound-mediated microbubble destruction promotes BMSC transplantation for myocardial infarction therapy. (omicsonline.org)
  • Myocardial infarction is caused by the loss of myocardial cells and decreased cardiac systolic and diastolic functions, and inevitably leads to heart failure. (omicsonline.org)
  • An example of this is the use of cells to replace cardiomyocytes after myocardial infarction. (wikipedia.org)
  • Among several clinical trials that have reported that adult stem-cell therapy is safe and effective, powerful effects have been reported from only a few laboratories, infarcts as well as heart failure not arising from myocardial infarction. (wikipedia.org)
  • Stem-cell therapy for treatment of myocardial infarction usually makes use of autologous bone-marrow stem cells (a specific type or all), however other types of adult stem cells may be used, such as adipose-derived stem cells. (wikipedia.org)
  • regenerative
  • Finally it is aimed to establish a new and regenerative treatment protocol alternative to liver transplantation. (clinicaltrials.gov)
  • Several different forms of stem cells have been identified and studied in the field of regenerative medicine. (wikipedia.org)
  • Therefore, an ideal treatment must possess both immunomodulating properties to control irregular autoimmune responses to prevent further damage and regenerative properties to stimulate natural repair mechanisms and replace damaged cells. (wikipedia.org)
  • Modulation of the major histocompatibility complex by neural stem cell-derived neurotrophic factors used for regenerative therapy in a rat model of stroke. (wikipedia.org)
  • Marrow nucleated cells are used every day in regenerative orthopedics. (wikipedia.org)
  • therapeutic
  • Therefore, liver regeneration is still thought to be an alternative ideal therapeutic approach for LF in clinical practice via activating mature hepatocytes, endogenous stem cells and circulating stem cells for regeneration of liver cells [ 10 ]. (hindawi.com)
  • To help discover the therapeutic uses of these stem cells they are grown in laboratories or by using medication to stimulate new cell growth within the human body. (wikipedia.org)
  • Nevertheless, these cells are being investigated as the basis for a number of therapeutic applications, including possible treatments for diabetes and Parkinson's disease. (wikipedia.org)
  • However, there are two main principles by which cells facilitate therapeutic action: Stem cell or progenitor cell engraftment, differentiation, and long term replacement of damaged tissue. (wikipedia.org)
  • This includes cells that naturally secrete the relevant therapeutic factors, or which undergo epigenetic changes or genetic engineering that causes the cells to release large quantities of a specific molecule. (wikipedia.org)
  • It owns 39 patents worldwide with intellectual property for the isolation of stem cells from the umbilical-cord lining membrane of all mammals, which also includes the banking and cultivation of these cells, as well as the therapeutic applications of these cells. (wikipedia.org)
  • Such results were not seen when human amniotic membrane was used without the cells indicating the therapeutic value of the cord lining EpSC. (wikipedia.org)
  • In a recent study, Wharton's Jelly tissue transplantation has shown to be able to reduce traumatic brain injury and may have therapeutic potential. (wikipedia.org)
  • tissues
  • Because the antibodies and accompanying cells of inflammation can involve tissues anywhere in the body, lupus has the potential to affect a variety of areas of the body. (clinicaltrials.gov)
  • Mesenchymal stem cells have the capacity to become any type of fully developed cell, which can contribute to replacing muscle tissues or internal organs. (wikipedia.org)
  • Pluripotent stem cells can be directly obtained from normal human mesenchymal tissues without using artificial manipulations such as gene introduction. (wikipedia.org)
  • As a result, that leaves the very small number of MSC's in the marrow as cells capable of differentiating into tissues of interest to joint preservation. (wikipedia.org)
  • The term encompasses multipotent cells derived from other non-marrow tissues, such as placenta, umbilical cord blood, adipose tissue, adult muscle, corneal stroma or the dental pulp of deciduous baby teeth. (wikipedia.org)
  • differentiate
  • There are cells in the human body that are capable to renew themselves and differentiate to a diverse range of specialized cell types. (clinicaltrials.gov)
  • In many laboratory studies, it is observed that human bone marrow derived mesenchymal stem cells, transplanted to animals with induced liver damage, differentiate into the albumin producing hepatocytes without fusion. (clinicaltrials.gov)
  • They can differentiate into many cell types including bone, fat, and muscle which allow them to treat a large range of disorders. (wikipedia.org)
  • Muse cells are shown to home into the damage site and spontaneously differentiate into tissue-compatible cells according to the microenvironment to contribute to tissue regeneration when infused into the blood stream. (wikipedia.org)
  • In this paradigm multipotent or unipotent cells differentiate into a specific cell type in the lab or after reaching the site of injury (via local or systemic administration). (wikipedia.org)
  • Most of these cells are CD34+ heme progenitors (destined to differentiate into blood components), while very few are actually MSC's capable of differentiating into bone, cartilage, or muscle. (wikipedia.org)
  • At some point, a signal is introduced (either in culture or after transplant to the damaged tissue) for the cells to differentiate into the end tissue (in this discussion, cartilage). (wikipedia.org)
  • They can be extracted, cultured, and induced to differentiate into mature cell types such as neurons. (wikipedia.org)
  • citation needed] Possible mechanisms of recovery include: Generation of heart muscle cells Stimulation of growth of new blood vessels to repopulate damaged heart tissue Secretion of growth factors Assistance via some other mechanism It may be possible to have adult bone-marrow cells differentiate into heart muscle cells. (wikipedia.org)
  • feasibility and safety
  • Researchers at the Cleveland Clinic, University Hospitals Seidman Cancer Center, and Case Western Reserve University are collaborating on a ground-breaking study that will test the feasibility and safety of using the body's own stem cells to treat MS. (healthcanal.com)
  • regeneration
  • It is aimed to enable liver regeneration, decrease fibrosis rate, improve patient's health conditions, increase ceruloplasmin synthesis, ameliorate disorder of copper metabolism, decrease the need for chelating agents, increase living standards of patients, and prolong waiting time for liver transplantation. (clinicaltrials.gov)
  • In this special topic, different views on the mechanisms of immunomodulation and regeneration by MSC and on the possible applications of MSC in transplantation and tissue regeneration will be put together. (frontiersin.org)
  • As the number of MSC's that can be isolated from bone marrow is fairly limited, most research in cartilage regeneration has focused on the use of culture expanded cells. (wikipedia.org)
  • Furthermore, due to their similarity in terms of phenotypic expression of keratins compared to normal human epidermal keratinocytes, cord lining EpSC have the potential to be an alternative source of cells for skin repair and regeneration. (wikipedia.org)
  • In order to reduce the length of time for regeneration, further research is being conducted to speed regeneration such as nerve grafts and stem cells. (wikipedia.org)
  • progenitor cells
  • They can then induce the release of bioactive agents and the formation of progenitor cells in response to these changes. (wikipedia.org)
  • Dr. Khay-Yong Saw and his team evaluated the quality of the repair knee cartilage after arthroscopic microdrilling (also microfracture) surgery followed by post-operative injections of autologous peripheral blood progenitor cells (PBPC) in combination with hyaluronic acid(HA). (wikipedia.org)
  • They also express p63, a specific marker of epithelial progenitor cells. (wikipedia.org)
  • Healthy adult brains contain neural stem cells which divide to maintain general stem-cell numbers, or become progenitor cells. (wikipedia.org)
  • In healthy adult laboratory animals, progenitor cells migrate within the brain and function primarily to maintain neuron populations for olfaction (the sense of smell). (wikipedia.org)
  • tissue
  • By this way, non-immunogeneic mesenchymal stem cells which have healthy genetic structure, can manufacture the required enzyme, will be repopulated in the damaged tissue and contribute to the clinical improvement. (clinicaltrials.gov)
  • Replenish new functional cells through spontaneous differentiation into tissue-compatible cells. (wikipedia.org)
  • These cells then integrate into the site of injury, replacing damaged tissue, and thus facilitate improved function of the organ or tissue. (wikipedia.org)
  • As a result, many researchers have focused on adult stem cells , or stem cells isolated from adult humans that can be transplanted into damaged tissue. (wikipedia.org)
  • CordLabs licenses its proprietary cord lining stem cell storage technology to cord blood banks, allowing them to also bank cord tissue from which the cord lining stem cells are derived. (wikipedia.org)
  • A similar study combining the cord lining MSC with carrier endothelial cells within a fibrin matrix in-vivo also revealed improvement in cardiac function, reduction in scar tissue formation and better vascularization. (wikipedia.org)
  • Mesenchymal stem cell population isolated from the subepithelial layer of umbilical cord tissue. (wikipedia.org)
  • N. K. Venkataramana is an Indian neurosurgeon and the founder of ANSA Research Foundation, a non profit non governmental organization promoting research on neuroscience, neurological disorders, cancer biology, stem cells and tumor tissue repository. (wikipedia.org)
  • The proposed method includes the conversion of mesenchymal stem cells (cells usually intended for generation of bones and adipose tissue) into neurons, after a short exposure to retinoic acid diluted in ethanol. (wikipedia.org)
  • Genetic
  • Animal studies on cord lining EpSC have shown that genetic modifications using the proinsulin gene allowed transplanted stem cells to lower blood glucose levels in diabetic animals. (wikipedia.org)
  • These cryovials are then placed into a tray, labeled with the cell line's genetic data, and placed into cryogenic freezers. (wikipedia.org)
  • Graft
  • Stromagen has been studied in the prevention of graft-versus-host disease during stem cell transplant in patients receiving treatment for cancer. (wikipedia.org)
  • Another stem-cell therapy called Prochymal, was conditionally approved in Canada in 2012 for the management of acute graft-vs-host disease in children who are unresponsive to steroids. (wikipedia.org)
  • patients
  • Stem cell transplantation is a new hopeful way to improve the patients conditions and reduce the period of disabilities. (clinicaltrials.gov)
  • Evaluation the improvement of FVC (spectrometry )in patients after cell transplantation. (clinicaltrials.gov)
  • To assess the outcomes, we will evaluate the patients at 2, 6 weeks and 3, 6 months after transplantation by: X-ray, BMD , VAS and biochemical analysis with laboratory tests. (clinicaltrials.gov)
  • Three patients did not receive cell transplantation because of insufficient cell expansion, an episode of pulmonary edema related to baseline catheterization and bone marrow aspiration, or acute colitis unrelated to the study procedure. (ahajournals.org)
  • Patients will be followed by Evaluation of EDSS MSFC RAO Test brain and cervical MRI and quality of life questionnaire after 1th 3th 6th and 12th months after transplantation.all these tests will be done before transplantation as basic evaluation. (clinicaltrials.gov)
  • Patients who are in control group underwent media injection but after 6 months they will be transplanted by stem cell. (clinicaltrials.gov)
  • Advanced age impairs cardioprotective function of mesenchymal stem cell transplantation from patients to myocardially infarcted rats. (sigmaaldrich.com)
  • In patients with MS, the immune system abnormally attacks the central nervous system, causing damage to the nerve cells and their protective myelin sheath. (healthcanal.com)
  • Organ transplantation remains to be a treatment of choice for patients suffering from irreversible organ failure. (springer.com)
  • In patients with MS, autoreactive lymphocytes such as T and B cells cause damage to the CNS by attacking myelin proteins. (wikipedia.org)
  • Till the end of 2013 he has treated over 7,000 patients with stem cell therapy with his medical team, involving many diseases, such as cerebral palsy, spinal cord injury, traumatic brain injury, diabetes, ulcerative colitis and cirrhosis. (wikipedia.org)
  • 2010 Application of HLA-A*0201/WT1 pentamer combined with intracellular IFNgamma+ staining in detecting circulating WT1 specific T cells in leukemia 2010 "Comparison of Wilms' tumor antigen 1-specific T lymphocyte generation soon after nonmyeloablative allergenic stem-cell transplantation in acute and chronic leukemia patients", published in Int J Hematol. (wikipedia.org)
  • The therapy consists in removing cells from the bone marrow of patients, their in vitro manipulation (incubation of stem cells for 2 hours in an 18 micromolar solution of retinoic acid), and finally their infusion into patients themselves. (wikipedia.org)
  • neurons
  • The standard test to confirm multipotency is differentiation of the cells into osteoblasts, adipocytes and chondrocytes as well as myocytes and neurons. (wikipedia.org)
  • Stroke and traumatic brain injury lead to cell death, characterized by a loss of neurons and oligodendrocytes within the brain. (wikipedia.org)
  • lymphocytes
  • Immunological analysis revealed an increase in the proportion of CD4 + CD25 + regulatory T cells, a decrease in the proliferative responses of lymphocytes, and the expression of CD40 + , CD83 + , CD86 + , and HLA-DR on myeloid dendritic cells at 24 hours after MSC transplantation. (pubmedcentralcanada.ca)
  • therapy
  • Cell therapy originated in the nineteenth century when scientists experimented by injecting animal material in an attempt to prevent and treat illness. (wikipedia.org)
  • Today two distinct categories of cell therapy are recognized. (wikipedia.org)
  • The first category is cell therapy in mainstream medicine. (wikipedia.org)
  • Cell therapy can be defined as therapy in which cellular material is injected into a patient. (wikipedia.org)
  • The origins of cell therapy can perhaps be traced to the nineteenth century, when Charles-Édouard Brown-Séquard (1817-1894) injected animal testicle extracts in an attempt to stop the effects of aging. (wikipedia.org)
  • In 1931 Paul Niehans (1882-1971) - who has been called the inventor of cell therapy - attempted to cure a patient by injecting material from calf embryos. (wikipedia.org)
  • Bone marrow transplants have been found to be effective, along with some other kinds of human cell therapy - for example in treating damaged knee cartilage. (wikipedia.org)
  • In recent times, cell therapy using human material has been recognized as an important field in the treatment of human disease. (wikipedia.org)
  • In mainstream medicine, cell therapy is supported by a distinct healthcare industry which sees strong prospects for future growth. (wikipedia.org)
  • Cell therapy is targeted at many clinical indications in multiple organs and by several modes of cell delivery. (wikipedia.org)
  • He is known to have introduced microdialysis of brain and stem cell therapy for cerebral palsy for the first time in Asia. (wikipedia.org)
  • Stem-cell therapy is the use of stem cells to treat or prevent a disease or condition. (wikipedia.org)
  • Bone marrow transplant is the most widely used stem-cell therapy, but some therapies derived from umbilical cord blood are also in use. (wikipedia.org)
  • this is the only form of stem-cell therapy that is widely practiced. (wikipedia.org)
  • Adult stem cell therapy for treating heart disease was commercially available in at least five continents as of 2007. (wikipedia.org)
  • Tissue
  • Amniotic fluid-derived mesenchymal stem cells lead to bone differentiation when cocultured with dental pulp stem cells," Tissue Engineering-Part A , vol. 17, no. 5-6, pp. 645-653, 2011. (hindawi.com)
  • Human amniotic fluid stem cells seeded in fibroin scaffold produce in vivo mineralized matrix," Tissue Engineering-Part A , vol. 17, no. 21-22, pp. 2833-2843, 2011. (hindawi.com)
  • The methodology to create induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) affords the opportunity to generate cells specific to the individual providing the host tissue. (jove.com)
  • Scientists investigated and compared the cellular responses of mesenchymal stem cells derived from bone marrow and synovium on combined silk scaffolds that can be used to determine the cell source most appropriate for tissue-engineered ligament. (celltherapynews.com)
  • Cell Tissue Res. (tamhsc.edu)
  • Human bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells (hMSCs) represent an appealing source of adult stem cells for cell therapy and tissue engineering, as they are easily obtained and expanded while maintaining their multilineage differentiation potential. (sushichoshi.com)
  • Mesenchymal Stem Cells (MSC) of the bone marrow have the ability to renew and differentiate themselves into multiple lineages of conjunctive tissues, including bone, cartilage, adipose tissue, tendon, muscle, and bone marrow stroma (3,4). (sushichoshi.com)
  • In bone tissue engineering, several strategies can be combined to heal and restore large bone defects, including bone graft substitution, stimulation with bone growth factors and suitable progenitor stem cell introduction to induce osteogenesis in vivo. (wmedicinereport.com)
  • Orthotopic models have their limitations too, but with proper technique tumor cells of interest can be accurately engrafted into tissue that most closely mimics conditions in the human brain. (jove.com)
  • This drives efforts to develop ways of using a person's own cells to grow, or re-grow cartilage tissue to replace missing or damaged cartilage. (wikipedia.org)
  • These cells are held in place by a small piece of soft tissue from the tibia, called a periosteal flap, which is sutured over the area to serve as a watertight lid. (wikipedia.org)
  • citation needed] A variation on the Carticel technique, called matrix-associated autologous chondrocyte transplantation (MACT), grows the patient's cells in a 3D matrix of resorbable tissue which is implanted via an open or arthroscopic procedure. (wikipedia.org)
  • The cells grow in self-organized spheroid matrices which are implanted via injected fluid or inserted tissue matrix. (wikipedia.org)
  • Research into new treatments for spinal cord injuries includes stem cell implantation, engineered materials for tissue support, epidural spinal stimulation, and wearable robotic exoskeletons. (wikipedia.org)
  • The damage can also be divided into primary and secondary injury: the cell death that occurs immediately in the original injury, and biochemical cascades that are initiated by the original insult and cause further tissue damage. (wikipedia.org)
  • The procedure involves removing adult stem cells of fatty tissue from lower body, and refining it to be able to re-inject living adipose stem cells into specific areas of the face without incision. (wikipedia.org)
  • The FAMI procedure differs from other fat transplantation procedures in that it takes the patient's facial vascular paths into account while using their own fatty tissue to address the loss of volume in the face without having to make incisions. (wikipedia.org)
  • The adult stem cells are taken from an area of fatty tissue in a separate area of the body, typically from the patient's hip, knee or abdomen. (wikipedia.org)
  • However, the implanted biological pacemaker cells still typically need to be supplemented with an artificial pacemaker while the cells form the necessary electrical connections with cardiac tissue. (wikipedia.org)
  • Furthermore, there are vast developments in tissue engineering, which involve leveraging of technologies from biomaterials, molecular medicine, biochemistry, nanotechnology, genetic and biomedical engineering for regeneration and cell expansion targets to restructure and/or repair human organs. (wikipedia.org)
  • Adipose tissue host progenitor cells with reported interesting cardiomyogenic and vasculogenic potential in the sense that they improve heart functions and reduce infarction size in rodent animal models. (wikipedia.org)
  • Hence, research has been focused on induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) from somatic human tissue. (wikipedia.org)
  • However, cardiac remodling remains limited due to limited cell residency, impact of mechanical forces onto cell survival and tissue hypoxia. (wikipedia.org)
  • Cardiac tissue engineering is a new technology based on the use of combinations of cells with regenerative capacity, biological and/or synthetic materials, cell signaling agents to induce the regeneration of an organ or damaged tissue. (wikipedia.org)
  • Adipose tissue (lipid cells), which requires extraction by liposuction. (wikipedia.org)
  • In practice, stem cells are identified by whether they can regenerate tissue. (wikipedia.org)
  • After the cells of interest have been isolated from living tissue, they can subsequently be maintained under carefully controlled conditions. (wikipedia.org)
  • In practice, the term "cell culture" now refers to the culturing of cells derived from multicellular eukaryotes, especially animal cells, in contrast with other types of culture that also grow cells, such as plant tissue culture, fungal culture, and microbiological culture (of microbes). (wikipedia.org)
  • The historical development and methods of cell culture are closely interrelated to those of tissue culture and organ culture. (wikipedia.org)
  • The laboratory technique of maintaining live cell lines (a population of cells descended from a single cell and containing the same genetic makeup) separated from their original tissue source became more robust in the middle 20th century. (wikipedia.org)
  • Cells can be isolated from solid tissues by digesting the extracellular matrix using enzymes such as collagenase, trypsin, or pronase, before agitating the tissue to release the cells into suspension. (wikipedia.org)
  • Alternatively, pieces of tissue can be placed in growth media, and the cells that grow out are available for culture. (wikipedia.org)
  • Therapies
  • However, for in vivo implantation, a large quantity of stem cells is required with extensive in vitro cell culture to ensure the success of cell-based therapies. (wmedicinereport.com)
  • This self-regeneration capacity gives rise to alternatives to classical cellular therapies whereby administration of growth factors such as Thymosin β4 for cell activation and migration are solely necessary. (wikipedia.org)
  • Recent work has suggested their application for stem cell therapies for muscular dystrophy. (wikipedia.org)
  • vivo
  • A novel approach to characterize the microstructural response of the myocardium to ischemia and cell therapy, using serial diffusion tensor MRI tractography of the heart in vivo , is presented. (celltherapynews.com)
  • Moreover, let-7 could promote ectopic bone formation of mesenchymal stem cells in vivo . (celltherapynews.com)
  • The authors introduced bone morphogenetic protein 2 (BMP2), an effective growth factor for bone formation, and herpes simplex virus thymidine kinase (HSV-tk) encoding genes into TDFs to engineer a specific, functional TDF cell line (TDF BMP2/HSV-tk) that induced bone regeneration in vivo. (wmedicinereport.com)
  • Additional concerns of the emergence of cancer cell-like features in the TDF population after in vivo stimulation of bone regeneration were addressed with previous reports showing that the re-injection of TDFs did not re-establish teratomas in mice with severe combined immunodeficiency (SCID). (wmedicinereport.com)
  • In the study, the engineered cell line showed enhanced alkaline phosphatase activity (ALP), elevated calcium content and mRNA expression of osteogenic genes in vitro, followed by remarkably improved bone volume formation in animal models in vivo. (wmedicinereport.com)
  • Recent advances in cell surface and intracellular marker identification and single-cell analyses led to greater resolution and high-throughput ex-vivo quantification. (wikipedia.org)
  • Cells can be isolated from tissues for ex vivo culture in several ways. (wikipedia.org)
  • clinical
  • Role of amniotic fluid mesenchymal cells engineered on MgHA/collagen-based scaffold allotransplanted on an experimental animal study of sinus augmentation," Clinical Oral Investigations , vol. 17, no. 7, pp. 1661-1675, 2013. (hindawi.com)
  • VetStem Technology: Summary VetStem Regenerative Cell Therapy is based on a clinical technology licensed from Artecel Inc. Original patents are from the University of Pittsburgh and Duke University. (stemcelltherapy.me)
  • The non-dilutive funding will support Gamida Cell's ongoing research and development efforts including its Phase III registration study of NiCord ® for hematological malignancies (blood cancers like leukemia and lymphoma), and its clinical trials of CordIn ® for sickle cell disease and thalassemia and NK cells as a potential immune therapy for cancer. (hematopoiesisnews.com)
  • There are an array of clinical variants of the disease, ranging from the asymptomatic monoclonal gammopathy of undetermined significance (MGUS) and smouldering MM, to the more aggressive active MM and plasma cell leukaemia. (biomedcentral.com)
  • 6 Clinical trials with stem cells. (docplayer.net)
  • Strategic decision to target an easier disease to get cells into clinical trial = Type-1 diabetes. (docplayer.net)
  • Antibodies are used to quantify and purify hematopoietic progenitor stem cells for research and for clinical bone marrow transplantation. (wikipedia.org)
  • Among progressing the use of stem cells for translational purposes, aiming at tapping the potential of stem cell biology towards clinical application, Hescheler actively promotes the vision of EPAA through innovative alternative testing strategies, applying stem cells towards toxicity testing. (wikipedia.org)
  • endothelial cells
  • Our aim was to develop and characterize a highly reproducible rat syngeneic in vitro model of the BBB using co-cultures of primary rat brain endothelial cells (RBEC) and astrocytes to study receptors involved in transcytosis across the endothelial cell monolayer. (jove.com)
  • Recent studies[citation needed] have suggested that mammal hearts also host naturally occurring cardiac stem cells which are capable of differentiating themselves into cardiomyocytes, endothelial cells and cardiac fibroblasts. (wikipedia.org)
  • ESCs
  • In a recent study, Yoon Young Go and co-workers isolated fibroblasts from a teratoma generated according to a previously established protocol, via the transplantation of human ESCs in immune-deficient mice. (wmedicinereport.com)
  • mice
  • Primary rat articular chondrocytes and bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells were cultured on the layers of bare poly(lactide-co-caprolactone) (PLCL) and mineralized PLCL nanofibers, respectively, for 7 days, and the biphasic cell-nanofiber construct was investigated at 4 weeks after implantation into nude mice. (celltherapynews.com)
  • Researchers investigated the reparative potential of human bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells and traced their homing patterns following administration to mice with ischemia/reperfusion injury using whole body bioluminescence imaging. (celltherapynews.com)
  • Additionally, KaLwRij mice exhibit an inherent ability to support the growth of exogenous malignant plasma cells. (biomedcentral.com)
  • In this model, cells are directly implanted into the ventral lobe of the prostate in Balb/c athymic mice, and allowed to progress for 4-6 weeks. (jove.com)
  • Increased glomerular filtration rate and impaired contractile function of mesangial cells in TRPC6 knockout mice. (abcam.co.jp)
  • It is important to mention that Long-Term Hematopoietic Stem Cells (LT-HSCs) in mice and humans are the hematopoietic cells with the greatest self-renewal capacity. (wikipedia.org)
  • Other genetic manipulation studies in mice indicate that the gene is required for the development and maintenance of bone marrow-based blood cell formation and the vascular network. (wikipedia.org)
  • This expression has the ability to produce B-cell lymphomas in transgenic mice and contribute to the survival of Burkitt's lymphoma in vitro. (wikipedia.org)
  • Transgenic mice expressing EBNA1 in B cell lines showed a predisposition for developing B cell lymphoma, thus demonstrating that EBNA1 is a viral oncogene and that it likely plays a role in B cell neoplasia. (wikipedia.org)
  • Experiments in alpha-sarcoglycan deficient dystrophic mice have shown that mesoangioblast transplantation can restore muscle function. (wikipedia.org)
  • fetal
  • The first successful experiment with biological pacemakers was carried out by Arjang Ruhparwar's group at Hannover Medical School in Germany using transplanted fetal heart muscle cells. (wikipedia.org)
  • genes
  • In the present study, MMP-9, uPAR and cathepsin B genes were downregulated in glioma xenograft cells using shRNA plasmid constructs and we evaluated the involvement of integrins and changes in their adhesion, migration and invasive potential. (jove.com)
  • Stem cell markers are genes and their protein products used by scientists to isolate and identify stem cells. (wikipedia.org)
  • Below is a list of genes/protein products that can be used to identify various types of stem cells, or functional assays that do the same. (wikipedia.org)
  • Both mutant proteins failed to enter cell nuclei normally and had a reduced capacity to target genes regulated by the normal ETV6 protein. (wikipedia.org)
  • EBNA1 is the only identified latent protein-encoding genes that it consistently expressed in Burkitt's lymphoma cells and is believed to contribute to EBV malignancies through B cell-directed expression. (wikipedia.org)
  • Regeneration
  • In order to reduce the length of time for regeneration, further research is being conducted to speed regeneration such as nerve grafts and stem cells. (wikipedia.org)
  • donor
  • Donor CAR T cells, on the other hand, brought remissions without this troubling complication. (hemacare.com)
  • Blood, which requires extraction through apheresis, wherein blood is drawn from the donor (similar to a blood donation), and passed through a machine that extracts the stem cells and returns other portions of the blood to the donor. (wikipedia.org)
  • phenotypes
  • He was the first scientist worldwide to perform electrophysiological and functional experiments on stem cells and differentiated phenotypes thereof. (wikipedia.org)
  • Culture conditions vary widely for each cell type, and variation of conditions for a particular cell type can result in different phenotypes. (wikipedia.org)
  • chemotherapy
  • Stem cell transplants are procedures that restore blood-forming stem cells in people who have had theirs destroyed by the very high doses of chemotherapy or radiation therapy that are used to treat certain cancers. (stemcelltherapy.me)
  • tumor
  • This implied that the HSV-tk suicide gene could modulate side-effects of stem cell therapy, including uncontrollable teratoma and tumor formation. (wmedicinereport.com)
  • Here we use tumor cell migration and invasion as an example and describe two related assays to illustrate the commonly used, easily accessible methods to measure these processes. (jove.com)
  • apoptosis
  • antiviral medication), the TDF cells underwent elimination by apoptosis due to the presence of the HSV-tk/ganciclovir gene marker. (wmedicinereport.com)
  • On exposure to GCV treatment, the engineered cell line underwent apoptosis, whereas the TDF control survived. (wmedicinereport.com)
  • Injection
  • In addition, a safety study showed safety better than surgical alternatives for this cultured cell injection procedure at a 3-year follow-up. (wikipedia.org)
  • Facial Autologous Muscular Injection is also known as Fat Autograft Muscular Injection, as Autologous Fat Injection, as Micro-lipoinjection, as Fat Transfer and as Facial Autologous Mesenchymal Integration, abbreviated as FAMI. (wikipedia.org)
  • Injection of cardiomyogenic and/or angiogenic stem cells have been proposed as alternatives to existing treatments. (wikipedia.org)