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  • PBDEs
  • For example, a flurry of recent studies shows that as the level of PBDEs, a type of flame retardant, increases in pregnant women's blood from 10 to 100 ppb, the IQ scores of their children drop by about 5 points. (thestar.com)
  • Add to glyphosate chemicals and vaccines which contain mercury - PCBs, PBDEs, and phthalates, and a perfect brew for autism rates to soar becomes apparent. (naturalsociety.com)
  • This study identifies environmental chemicals of concern such as: arsenic (45.0 ± 15.0 µg/g creatinine), lead (5.40 ± 2.80 µg/dL), t,t-muconic acid (266 ± 220 µg/g creatinine), 1-hydroxypyrene (0.25 ± 0.15 µmol/mol creatinine), PBDEs (28.0 ± 15.0 ng/g lipid), and PCBs (33.0 ± 16.0 ng/g lipid). (springer.com)
  • prenatal
  • We defined mean prenatal mercury concentration as the mean of total whole blood mercury concentrations in maternal samples collected at 16- and 26-weeks of gestation, delivery, and neonatal cord blood samples. (biomedcentral.com)
  • We used multiple linear mixed models and linear regression models to estimate the association between mean prenatal mercury concentrations and child behavior and anxiety, respectively. (biomedcentral.com)
  • The median prenatal total blood mercury concentrations was 0.67 μg/L. Overall, we did not find statistically significant associations between mean prenatal mercury concentrations and behavior problems scores, but a 2-fold increase in mercury concentrations at 16-weeks gestation was associated with 0.83 point (95% CI: 0.05, 1.62) higher BASC-2 anxiety scores. (biomedcentral.com)
  • We found limited evidence of an association between very-low level prenatal mercury exposure and behaviors in children, with an exception of anxiety. (biomedcentral.com)
  • Lanphear, the recipient of a 2011 SFU prize in support of controversy, co-authored a study showing prenatal BPA exposure worsens girls' behaviour. (medicalxpress.com)
  • This is the first time that prenatal health practitioners, researchers, educators, policy makers and environmental health experts from across Canada will be coming together to share their knowledge and discuss strategies for integrating education about early-life exposures to toxic substances into prenatal clinical practice," says Eric Crighton a researcher at the University of Ottawa. (medicalxpress.com)
  • Some suggest that prenatal exposure to PCBs and mercury is related to performance impairments, attention and concentration problems, while other do not present any statistically significant association. (aaem.pl)
  • Harley KG, Rauch SA, Chevrier J et al (2017) Association of prenatal and childhood PBDE exposure with timing of puberty in boys and girls. (springer.com)
  • occur
  • ES can occur when people become sensitive to substances or phenomena in their everyday environment at levels well below what would be considered to be acceptable to the general population. (openparliament.ca)
  • EPA therefore picks a spot where they believe the greatest exposure will occur, then EPA establishes the concentration (in parts per million) that they believe the individual can "safely" receive during a lifetime of exposure. (ejnet.org)
  • cadmium
  • Diaz-Barriga F, Santos MA, Mejia JJ et al (1993) Arsenic and cadmium exposure in children living near a smelter complex in San Luis Potosi, Mexico. (springer.com)
  • Cigarette smokers tend to have much higher levels of arsenic and cadmium than non-smokers. (needs.com)
  • child's
  • How can the government deem something safe if it has never been tested singularly - let alone how the effects from multiple exposures (PCBs, mercury, glyphosate, etc.) can devastate a child's immune system and neurological soundness when considered together? (naturalsociety.com)
  • consequences
  • the developing fetus and child are particularly vulnerable to toxic exposures, and the consequences of inadequate protection can be significant," says Erica Phipps, Executive Director for the Canadian Partnership for Children's Health and Environment (CPCHE). (medicalxpress.com)
  • Great Lakes
  • Many of the inland lakes, both in Ontario and elsewhere - not just around the Great Lakes, but elsewhere - there's mercury in those fish. (environmentreport.org)
  • Somewhere between 60% and 90% of the PCBs entering the Great Lakes come from the atmosphere, according to Travis and Hester. (ejnet.org)
  • deficits
  • Exposure to organic solvents during development may cause a spectrum of disorders, including structural birth defects, hyperactivity, attention deficits, reduced IQ, learning and memory deficiencies. (latitudes.org)
  • Since then, much lower levels of exposure to lead have been shown to result in learning deficits and brain disorders, like ADHD. (thestar.com)
  • histories
  • But comparing Type 2s taking Lantus, Avandia, Actos, Metformin and Januvia with Type 1s using R insulin or for that matter, Type 2s taking only Sulfonylureas and NPH (a common European protocol), may mean that you are comparing two different populations with different blood sugar histories and drug exposures. (blogspot.com)
  • pregnant
  • Some studies of people who eat lots of fish have linked even low-level mercury exposure in pregnant women and young children to subtle impairments in hearing, hand-eye coordination, and learning ability. (consumerreports.org)
  • But, the mercury in that very same tuna would cause so much brain damage that the overall effect of eating tuna while pregnant would be negative-wiping out an average of eight IQ points. (nutritionfacts.org)
  • Basu N, Tutino R, Zhang Z et al (2014) Mercury levels in pregnant women, children, and seafood from Mexico City. (springer.com)
  • assessment
  • The studies were mostly well designed, using prospective cohorts with the exposure assessment based on the biomarker of exposure. (aaem.pl)
  • Costilla-Salazar R, Trejo-Acevedo A, Rocha-Amador D et al (2011) Assessment of polychlorinated biphenyls and mercury levels in soil and biological samples from San Felipe, Nuevo Mercurio, Zacatecas, Mexico. (springer.com)
  • Martínez-Salinas RI, Elena Leal M, Batres-Esquivel LE et al (2010) Exposure of children to polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in Mexico: assessment of multiple sources. (springer.com)
  • Salmon
  • At the other end of the spectrum, the brain-boosting effect of DHA may trump the brain-damaging effects of mercury in salmon by a little less than one IQ point. (nutritionfacts.org)
  • And, the IQ study didn't take into account the relatively high levels of PCBs in salmon, and the accompanying concerns about "cancer risk. (nutritionfacts.org)
  • fatty
  • Fortunately, it's easy to choose lower-mercury fish that are also rich in healthful omega-3 fatty acids. (consumerreports.org)
  • Today we weigh the potential health benefits of omega-3 fatty acids with the risks of ingesting too much mercury. (nutritionfacts.org)
  • DDT and PCBs are most soluble in the fatty tissues of living things, so they tend to move into the food chain and concentrate in living things. (ejnet.org)
  • widespread
  • U.S. data shows that widespread exposure to a neurotoxin, like lead, that causes a 5-point drop in IQ across a population would result in a 57 per cent increase in the number of U.S. children who are challenged, from 6 million to 9.4 million. (thestar.com)
  • brain
  • According to EPA estimates, about 1.16 million women in the U.S. of childbearing years eat sufficient amounts of mercury-contaminated fish to risk damaging brain development of their children. (latitudes.org)
  • Mercury exposure at high levels can harm the brain, heart, kidneys, lungs and immune system of people of all ages. (eponline.com)
  • This episode features audio from Mercury vs. Omega-3s for Brain Development , Omega-3s, Prostate Cancer, and Atrial Fibrillation , and Omega-3s and the Eskimo Fish Tale . (nutritionfacts.org)
  • But, of course, the mercury is bad for brain development. (nutritionfacts.org)
  • impairments
  • Middlemore-Risher ML, Buccafusco JJ, Terry AV Jr. Repeated exposures to low-level chlorpyrifos results in impairments in sustained attention and increased impulsivity in rats. (aaem.pl)
  • clinical
  • Most primary care physicians lack training in and knowledge of the clinical recognition, management and avoidance of such exposures. (cmaj.ca)
  • human
  • 3 Some mercury is released by cremation of human or animal remains. (aappublications.org)
  • The participants at the Wingspread workshop agreed that sufficient evidence is available to demonstrate that exposures to certain toxic substances, including PCBs and related chemicals, have been sufficient to harm human health. (ijc.org)
  • Without interventions, future exposures will continue to harm human health. (ijc.org)
  • What separates Travis and Hester from other U.S. government researchers before them is their stated belief that all this pollution is taking its toll on human health: "We maintain that ambient [normal, everyday] levels of pollution have risen to the point where human health is being affected on a global scale. (ejnet.org)
  • high levels
  • Although the dominant health concerns arise from gestational exposure, infants and children may be exposed postnatally to MeHg from breast milk should their mothers consume foods that contain high levels or if they consume fish or foodstuffs that contain fish products. (aappublications.org)
  • bodies
  • The predominant source of MeHg in the aquatic environment is atmospheric mercury deposited on the surfaces of bodies of water that is then biomethylated by microorganisms and subsequently biomagnified as it ascends the food chain. (aappublications.org)
  • Not only is farmed trout a great choice for those who want to increase their omega-3 intake, it is also an excellent choice for those who are worried about too much mercury getting into their bodies. (healwithfood.org)
  • environment
  • Mercury is naturally present in the environment. (aappublications.org)
  • Of the approximately 3400 metric tons per year of elemental mercury released into the global environment, 95% resides in terrestrial soils, 3% in ocean surface waters, and the remaining 2% in the atmosphere. (aappublications.org)
  • 1 Approximately 70% of the mercury in the environment comes from anthropogenic sources, primarily emissions from coal-fired electric power generation facilities and waste dumps, 2 although natural sources such as volcanos and mines also deposit it in the environment. (aappublications.org)
  • In these forms, mercury remains in the environment indefinitely. (aappublications.org)
  • The Chemicals Management Plan (CMP) is a program to protect Canadians and their environment from exposure to harmful chemicals and living organisms. (gc.ca)
  • One could raise doubts about many aspects of this approach to pollution control, but the ORNL researchers highlighted only one key problem: continuous releases of mercury (or radioactivity, or other toxin), although they may protect the most-exposed individual, do nevertheless allow toxic materials to enter the environment continuously. (ejnet.org)
  • data
  • Blood samples and sociodemographic data were collected by Akwesasne community members, without prior knowledge of participants' exposure status. (nih.gov)