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  • Family
  • A number of specific carrier proteins for members of the vitamin A family have been discovered. (wikipedia.org)
  • The protein encoded by this gene belongs to the lipocalin family. (wikipedia.org)
  • Acyl carrier protein synthases (ACPS) are members of the family of phosphopantethienyl transferases responsible for the conversion of the inactive apo-Acyl carrier protein from fatty acid or polyketide biosynthesis into the active holo form through the post-translational addition of a 4'-phosphopantethiene chain derived from coenzyme A. (wikipedia.org)
  • Among animal AAAP family members are numerous growth regulating System A and System N isoforms, each exhibiting distinctive tissue and subcellular localizations. (wikipedia.org)
  • SLC1A2 / EAAT2 is a member of a family of the solute carrier family of proteins. (wikipedia.org)
  • It is a member of the multicopper oxidase family and is therefore homologous to laccase (benzenediol:oxygen oxidoreductase or ligninolytic phenol oxidase), as well as L-ascorbate oxidase, ceruloplasmin and dihydrogeodin oxidase. (wikipedia.org)
  • A single protein, PbrT (TC# 2.A.108.2.1), encoded within the lead resistance locus of Ralstonia metallidurans CH34, serves as the prototype for the PbrT family. (wikipedia.org)
  • The generalized transport reactions catalyzed by members of the PbrT family are: (1) Pb2+ (out) → Pb2+ (in), and (2) Fe2+ (out) → Fe2+ (in). (wikipedia.org)
  • 2.A.116 The Peptidoglycolipid Addressing Protein (GAP) Family. (wikipedia.org)
  • Functionally-characterized members of the family appear to catalyze inorganic phosphate (Pi) or inorganic sulfate uptake either by H+ or Na+ symport. (wikipedia.org)
  • The generalized transport reactions possibly catalyzed by members of the PiT family are: HPO42− (out) + [nH+ or Na+] (out) → HPO42− (in) + [nH+ or Na+] (in) Me2+ · HPO42− (out) + nH+ (out) → Me2+ · HPO42− (in) + nH+ (in) SO42− (out) + nH+ (out) → SO42− (in) + nH+ (in). (wikipedia.org)
  • Members of the PiT family arose by a tandem internal gene duplication event. (wikipedia.org)
  • A family of Rab27-binding proteins. (wikipedia.org)
  • UniProt
  • p>When browsing through different UniProt proteins, you can use the 'basket' to save them, so that you can back to find or analyse them later. (uniprot.org)
  • UCP3
  • Since protein UCP3 is affecting the long chain fatty acid metabolism and preventing cytosolic triglyceride storage. (wikipedia.org)
  • Telmisartan being an inhibitor by proven studies on rat skeletal muscle and improving the mutant protein activity and also its involvement in the dominant negative UCP3 mutants(C V Musa et al. (wikipedia.org)
  • Sequence
  • Note that the 'protein existence' evidence does not give information on the accuracy or correctness of the sequence(s) displayed. (uniprot.org)
  • p>This section provides information about the protein and gene name(s) and synonym(s) and about the organism that is the source of the protein sequence. (uniprot.org)
  • section indicates the name(s) of the gene(s) that code for the protein sequence(s) described in the entry. (uniprot.org)
  • homologous
  • UCPs contain the three homologous protein domains of MACPs. (wikipedia.org)
  • Its copper binding domain is homologous to that of the PcoA copper binding protein of E. coli. (wikipedia.org)
  • Surprisingly, TopPred predicts a 12 TMS topology for the yeast Pho89 protein, but the homologous regions are not predicted to show similar topological features. (wikipedia.org)
  • regulate
  • Ligand binding by the START domain in multidomain proteins can also regulate the activities of the other domains, such as the RhoGAP domain, the homeodomain and the thioesterase domain. (wikipedia.org)
  • Function
  • p>This subsection of the 'Function' section describes a region in the protein which binds nucleotide phosphates. (uniprot.org)
  • Cellular retinoic acid binding proteins (CRABP) are low molecular weight proteins whose precise function remains largely unknown. (wikipedia.org)
  • Expression of this protein is observed in 16 different tissue types, indicating that the protein may serve a housekeeping function. (wikipedia.org)
  • DL-TBOA, WAY-213613, and dihydrokainic acid are known inhibitors of the protein, and function as excitotoxins. (wikipedia.org)
  • They function as carriers to the cell surface in post-golgi recycling pathways. (wikipedia.org)
  • TC# 2.A.20.2.7) have been reported to function as viral receptors, but they undoubtedly function as transport proteins as well. (wikipedia.org)
  • Residues
  • The protein exhibits a single N-terminal hydrophobic segment (a putative TMS), plus 6 additional putative TMSs in the C-terminal region (residues 420-650) of this 652 aas protein. (wikipedia.org)
  • An N-terminal domain (residues 100-218 in the R. metallidurans protein) shows similarity to the C-terminal cytochrome C6 domain in the diheme c-type cytochrome, FixP of Azorhizobium caulinodans. (wikipedia.org)
  • hydrophobic
  • Most importantly, the interior of the protein encompasses a 26 × 12 × 11-Angstrom hydrophobic tunnel that is apparently large enough to bind a single cholesterol molecule. (wikipedia.org)
  • inhibitors
  • p>Describes annotations that are concluded from looking at variations or changes in a gene product such as mutations or abnormal levels and includes techniques such as knockouts, overexpression, anti-sense experiments and use of specific protein inhibitors. (uniprot.org)
  • lipids
  • The three main purposes of metabolism are the conversion of food/fuel to energy to run cellular processes, the conversion of food/fuel to building blocks for proteins, lipids, nucleic acids, and some carbohydrates, and the elimination of nitrogenous wastes. (wikipedia.org)
  • Inside cells under normal conditions, lysosomes convert, or metabolize, lipids and proteins into smaller components to provide energy for the body. (wikipedia.org)
  • Nucleic
  • Metabolism is usually divided into two categories: catabolism, the breaking down of organic matter for example, the breaking down of glucose to pyruvate, by cellular respiration, and anabolism, the building up of components of cells such as proteins and nucleic acids. (wikipedia.org)
  • acidic
  • If an embryo has not initiated the thinning process naturally, a small "window" is created chemically in the wall of the protein coat using a dilute acidic solution pulsed onto the embryo surface through an extremely fine glass needle. (arizonafertility.com)
  • membrane protein
  • Single-pass type I membrane protein. (bosterbio.com)
  • This general experimental approach is recognized today and has become a standard tool for membrane protein research. (wikipedia.org)
  • Lewis S. Rosenstiel Award (1973) Member of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences (1986) Member of the National Academy of Sciences (1987)National Academy of Sciences (1987) Anatrace Membrane Protein Award (2007) Distinguished Alumni Achievement Award (2009) Peter Mitchell Memorial Medal (2012) The results of Kaback's studies are described in over 450 publications in peer-reviewed scientific journals. (wikipedia.org)
  • phosphatase
  • Alkaline phosphatase (ALP, ALKP, ALPase, Alk Phos) (EC 3.1.3.1) or basic phosphatase is a homodimeric protein enzyme of 86 kilodaltons. (wikipedia.org)
  • Alkaline phosphatase in E. coli is uncommonly soluble and active within elevated temperature conditions such as 80 °C. Due to the kinetic energy induced by this temperature the weak hydrogen bonds and hydrophobic interactions of common proteins become degraded and therefore coalesce and precipitate. (wikipedia.org)
  • Alkaline phosphatase in E. coli is located in the periplasmic space and can thus be released using techniques that weaken the cell wall and release the protein. (wikipedia.org)
  • amino
  • 2. The fusion protein according to claim 1, wherein the Targeting Moiety and the protease cleavage site are separated by at most 10 amino acid residues, preferably by at most 5 amino acid residues, and more preferably by at most zero amino acid residues. (patentsencyclopedia.com)
  • 6. The fusion protein according to claim 1, wherein the Targeting Moiety comprises at most 50 amino acid residues, preferably at most 40 amino acid residues, more preferably at least 30 amino acid residues, and most preferably at most 20 amino acid residues. (patentsencyclopedia.com)
  • Proteins are made of amino acids arranged in a linear chain joined together by peptide bonds. (wikipedia.org)
  • family
  • Other susceptible family members occur among siblings of the index case, and not among other relatives. (pharmacologicalsciences.us)
  • West Nile Virus (WNV) is a member of the flavivirus family, which are small (~11,000 bases) single-stranded RNA viruses that typically infect many species and often have an insect vector. (iayork.com)
  • SNARE complexes contain at least one member of the syntaxin family, in addition to two or three other cognate SNAREs. (rupress.org)
  • Predominantly, members of the plant family Leguminosae have evolved with nitrogen fixing bacteria from the family Rhizobiaceae. (intechopen.com)
  • SLC9A10 is a member of the sodium-hydrogen exchanger (NHE) family and is required for male fertility and sperm motility. (wikipedia.org)
  • Mitochondrial uncoupling proteins (UCP) are members of the larger family of mitochondrial anion carrier proteins (MACP). (wikipedia.org)
  • Carrier testing is typically offered to individuals who are considering pregnancy or are already pregnant, have a family history of a specific genetic disorder and to people in ethnic backgrounds that have an increased risk of specific genetic conditions. (wikipedia.org)
  • cellular
  • Taking a systems approach, we develop and summarise the view that "serum ferritin" actually originates from damaged cells (and thus reflects cellular damage), that it contains some iron but has lost or liberated most of its normal content, and that since the protein part of ferritin is assumed to be benign, that it is this (initially) free iron that correlates with and is causative of disease. (rsc.org)
  • transcript
  • The transcript initiated from the proximal promoter encodes the longer SCPx protein, and the transcript initiated from the distal promoter encodes the shorter SCP2 protein, with the 2 proteins sharing a common C-terminus. (wikipedia.org)
  • functional
  • Although grown worldwide for its protein and oil, high value added products such as plant functional nutraceuticals, including phospholipids, saponins, isoflavones, oligosaccharides and edible fibre, have gained importance in the last decade. (intechopen.com)
  • genetic
  • PGD can be utilized by individuals or couples who are affected by a condition of genetic origin, or if both individuals are found to be carriers of a recessive genetic condition. (wikipedia.org)
  • Cell
  • Other proteins have structural or mechanical functions, such as those that form the cytoskeleton, a system of scaffolding that maintains the cell shape. (wikipedia.org)
  • Proteins are also important in cell signaling, immune responses, cell adhesion, active transport across membranes, and the cell cycle. (wikipedia.org)
  • Results showed that there are special proteins (lectins) present on the zeospheres of the fungi which recognize specific sugar moieties upon the algal cell wall. (wikipedia.org)
  • cells
  • Expression of mislocalized mutant syntaxin 3 in Madin-Darby canine kidney cells leads to basolateral mistargeting of apical membrane proteins, disturbance of tight junction formation, and loss of ability to form an organized polarized epithelium. (rupress.org)
  • found
  • Serum ferritin" presents a paradox, as the iron storage protein ferritin is not synthesised in serum yet is to be found there. (rsc.org)
  • domain
  • 4. The fusion protein according claim 1, wherein the translocation domain is the H N domain of a clostridial neurotoxin. (patentsencyclopedia.com)
  • Both the cyclooxygenase and the peroxidase active sites are located in the catalytic domain, which accounts for approximately 80% of the protein. (wikipedia.org)
  • high
  • The copra is pressed or dissolved with solvents, producing the coconut oil and a high-protein, high-fiber mash. (wikipedia.org)
  • upon
  • carrier free antibody available upon request. (bosterbio.com)
  • The key to effective inactivation depended upon a color test developed by Youngner, which allowed formalin induced viral protein degradation to be accurately plotted. (wikipedia.org)
  • important
  • Soybean ( Glycine max (L.) Merrill) is a globally important commercial crop, grown mainly for its protein, oil and nutraceutical contents. (intechopen.com)
  • normal
  • Susceptible persons are offspring of phenotypically normal parents who are carriers of the trait. (pharmacologicalsciences.us)
  • In matings between two phenotypically normal heterozygotes, the probability of having a susceptible child (the segregation frequency) averages 1 /4 (Figure 5.3) and that of having a carrier among phenotypically normal children is 2/3. (pharmacologicalsciences.us)
  • The protein in serum ferritin is considered benign, but it has lost ( i.e. dumped) most of its normal complement of iron which when unliganded is highly toxic. (rsc.org)
  • research
  • As a member of the Jonas Salk research team, Youngner contributed in the development of polio vaccine, including techniques for large scale production of poliovirus and the rapid color test measurement of polio virus in living tissue. (wikipedia.org)
  • association
  • This association was absent in BRCA2 carriers ( p = 0.57). (springer.com)
  • Since 2009 Boussiba has also served as a member of the European Algae Biomass Association (EABA), and since 2014 he has served as the head of its scientific board. (wikipedia.org)
  • thought
  • These targeting signals are thought to be recognized in the TGN or endosomes, which leads to the sorting of cargo proteins into transport vesicles destined for the apical or basolateral plasma membrane. (rupress.org)
  • Board
  • Between 2009 and 2012 Boussiba served as a member of the board of directors at the Inter-University Marine Biology and Biotechnology Institute in Eilat. (wikipedia.org)
  • uses
  • The all-wet process uses raw coconut rather than dried copra, and the protein in the coconut creates an emulsion of oil and water. (wikipedia.org)
  • University
  • After completing a Sc.D. degree in microbiology at the University of Michigan, Youngner stayed on as a faculty member, and left in 1947 to join the National Cancer Institute (NCI) in Bethesda. (wikipedia.org)
  • In 1989 he became an Investigator of the Howard Hughes Medical Institute and Professor of Physiology and Microbiology, Immunology & Molecular Genetics, as well as a member of the Molecular Biology Institute at the University of California Los Angeles. (wikipedia.org)