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  • amelanotic melanoma
  • The researchers published a study in the journal JAMA Dermatology that outlines key features linked to amelanotic melanoma, a form of skin cancer that lacks the brown or black color that stems from the pigment melanin. (news-medical.net)
  • Amelanotic melanoma is linked to worse survival because it's more likely to be diagnosed at a later stage,' said the study's senior author Nancy E. Thomas, MD, PhD, a UNC Lineberger member, the Irene & Robert Alan Briggaman Distinguished Professor and chair in the UNC School of Medicine Department of Dermatology. (news-medical.net)
  • A 2014 study led by UNC Lineberger researchers found that amelanotic melanoma was typically diagnosed at more advanced stages than pigmented melanoma, and that the risk of death was higher. (news-medical.net)
  • Amelanotic melanoma can evade detection because it falls outside a commonly used diagnostic criteria. (news-medical.net)
  • We wanted to identify patients at higher risk for amelanotic melanoma in whom we need to look carefully for this cancer type. (news-medical.net)
  • They found that people who lacked moles on their backs, who had many freckles, and 'sun-sensitive' features - including red hair, light-colored eyes and an inability to tan -- had higher odds of developing amelanotic melanoma. (news-medical.net)
  • We hope this helps raise awareness for the potential for amelanotic melanoma in this group. (news-medical.net)
  • ultraviolet
  • One of the most important contributors to melanoma is ultraviolet (UV) sun damage. (kidshealth.org)
  • MC1R mutations also are sometimes involved in melanomas that develop independent of exposure to ultraviolet light. (britannica.com)
  • Exposure to ultraviolet (UV) light from the sun is thought to cause most melanomas, but there's evidence to suggest that some may result from sunbed exposure. (www.nhs.uk)
  • The exact cause of all melanomas isn't clear, but exposure to ultraviolet (UV) radiation from sunlight or tanning lamps and beds increases your risk of developing melanoma. (mayoclinic.org)
  • Still, doctors believe exposure to ultraviolet (UV) radiation from the sun and from tanning lamps and beds is the leading cause of melanoma. (mayoclinic.org)
  • Ultraviolet (UV) rays are clearly a major cause of melanoma. (cancer.org)
  • Ultraviolet energy Melanoma often occurs on parts of the body exposed to UV energy. (nccn.org)
  • occur
  • Acral lentiginous melanomas are a rare type of melanoma that usually occur on the palms of the hands and soles of the feet. (www.nhs.uk)
  • Acral lentiginous melanomas are the most common type of melanoma in people with dark skin, but they can occur in people with any skin type. (www.nhs.uk)
  • Melanomas can also occur in areas that don't receive much sun exposure, such as the soles of your feet, palms of your hands and fingernail beds. (mayoclinic.org)
  • These are sometimes referred to as hidden melanomas because they occur in places most people wouldn't think to check. (mayoclinic.org)
  • When melanoma occurs in people with darker skin, it's more likely to occur in a hidden area. (mayoclinic.org)
  • This refined characterization improves our understanding of the progressive changes that occur in melanoma cells during dedifferentiation, which can help develop better strategies to target this form of therapy resistance," says first study author Jennifer Tsoi, a UCLA researcher. (medicalnewstoday.com)
  • Some melanomas occur in parts of the body that are rarely exposed to sunlight. (cancer.org)
  • It seems to occur during the development of the melanoma. (cancer.org)
  • Although skin melanomas can occur anywhere on the body, the chest and back are the most common sites for men. (moffitt.org)
  • For women, melanomas often occur on the legs. (moffitt.org)
  • lymph node
  • If the sentinel lymph node is clear of melanoma, it's extremely unlikely that any other lymph nodes are affected. (www.nhs.uk)
  • If the sentinel lymph node contains melanoma, there's a risk that other lymph nodes in the same group will also contain melanoma. (www.nhs.uk)
  • But, for melanomas that are thicker, are ulcerated, and/or have lymph node spread, the risk of recurrence after surgery goes up. (nccn.org)
  • exposure
  • Over exposure to sunlight can cause skin changes which can lead to melanoma. (cancerindex.org)
  • And though you might think that ongoing exposure - being in the sun because you work outside, for example - would increase someone's risk of melanoma, it's actually occasional exposure that has the potential to do the most damage. (kidshealth.org)
  • Melanomas are uncommon in areas which are protected from sun exposure, such as the buttocks and the scalp. (www.nhs.uk)
  • The type of sun exposure that causes melanoma is sudden intense exposure - for example, while on holiday, which leads to sunburn . (www.nhs.uk)
  • Limiting your exposure to UV radiation can help reduce your risk of melanoma. (mayoclinic.org)
  • Melanomas can also develop in areas of your body that have little or no exposure to the sun, such as the spaces between your toes and on your palms, soles, scalp or genitals. (mayoclinic.org)
  • cells
  • Melanoma is caused by skin cells that begin to develop abnormally. (www.nhs.uk)
  • Just what damages DNA in skin cells and how this leads to melanoma isn't clear. (mayoclinic.org)
  • The scientists examined the process of dedifferentiation - that is, the process in which melanoma cells regress to an earlier stage of embryonic development - and found that, depending on the stage that they're in, melanomas can be broken down into four different subtypes. (medicalnewstoday.com)
  • The analysis revealed that melanoma cells can be divided into four subgroups, according to the genes that are activated and deactivated in each differentiation stage. (medicalnewstoday.com)
  • Researchers have found some gene changes inside mole cells that may cause them to become melanoma cells. (cancer.org)
  • Most of the gene changes commonly seen in melanoma cells are not inherited. (cancer.org)
  • Many other gene changes have been found in melanoma cells as well. (cancer.org)
  • The melanoma cells are only in the epidermis (the outer layer of skin) and have not invaded the dermis (the second layer of skin, under the epidermis). (nccn.org)
  • neurotropism Melanoma cells are able to grow into (invade) nerves. (nccn.org)
  • Feb. 11, 2011 -- An experimental, noninvasive test that relies on a special adhesive tape to collect cells from suspicious skin lesions can accurately identify both early and advanced melanomas, researchers say. (webmd.com)
  • thickness
  • The thickness of the melanoma is called the Breslow measurement . (cancer.org)
  • Healthcare professionals use a staging system called the AJCC system to describe how far melanoma has grown into the skin (the thickness) and whether it has spread. (www.nhs.uk)
  • mutations
  • About 50 percent of melanomas are associated with spontaneous mutations in a gene known as BRAF , which produces a protein called B-raf . (britannica.com)
  • Other genetic variants linked to melanoma include mutations in a tumour suppressor gene known as CDKN2A , which produces a kinase involved in regulating the cell cycle and cell division . (britannica.com)
  • Melanoma: from mutations to medicine. (springer.com)
  • genetic
  • Melanoma is a highly heterogeneous malignancy that is the result of the accumulation of genetic and epigenetic defects. (springer.com)
  • Genome and transcriptome analyses and extensive studies in DNA methylation, chromatin modifications and nucleosome positioning have revolutionised our genetic and epigenetic knowledge of melanoma over the last decade. (springer.com)
  • Skolnick MH, Cannon-Albright LA, Kamb A. Genetic predisposition to melanoma. (springer.com)
  • spread
  • If not caught early, melanoma can spread from the skin to other organs - often with deadly results. (kidshealth.org)
  • After someone is diagnosed with melanoma, doctors will try to figure out if it has spread, and if so, how far. (cancer.org)
  • Melanoma can spread to (invade) the lower part of the skin, called the dermis, to reach nearby tissues and other parts of the body. (nccn.org)
  • He was told that this melanoma had spread to other organs. (infobarrel.com)
  • If melanoma is found, other tests may be done to find out if it has spread to other areas of the body. (cancer.org)
  • Enlarged lymph nodes might suggest that melanoma could have spread there. (cancer.org)
  • If it seem appropriate after examination by the pathologist chemotherapy can be used to try to limit the spread of the melanoma. (vetinfo.com)
  • This can be reassuring because if melanoma reaches the lymph nodes, it's more likely to spread elsewhere. (www.nhs.uk)
  • Stage IV The melanoma has spread to one or more distant sites. (nccn.org)
  • spreads
  • If melanoma spreads, it will usually begin spreading through channels in the skin (lymphatics) to the nearest group of glands (lymph nodes). (www.nhs.uk)
  • prevention
  • The L'Oreal-owned brand has tapped Rebecca Minkoff, Sean Avery, Padma Lakshmi and Annabelle Dexter-Jones to raise awareness about melanoma prevention. (wwd.com)