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  • Zyrtec
  • Can you take Claritan Nasal Spray and another OTC allergy med such as Claritan, Zyrtec, etc. (drugs.com)
  • First, generic medications are required to have the same active ingredients as brand name medications (for example, loratidine or cetirizine, which are the active ingredients in Claritin and Zyrtec respectively). (zocdoc.com)
  • claritin
  • my allergiste gave me singulair and aerius before my shots until feb. and when i take them i notice in the morning my eyes r really dry and hurt, just like when i took claritin (anti histamine allergy pill) he told me to take em every day, but i dont need them everyday because i sometimes i dont need to go out. (healingwell.com)
  • Pharmacy
  • Order your prescriptions from Humana Pharmacy ® and you'll receive your medications at home with free standard shipping! (humana.com)
  • Chewy Pet Pharmacy carries a variety of vet-prescribed allergy meds for dogs as well as medicines to treat cat allergies, from topical solutions to tablets. (chewy.com)
  • At Chewy Pharmacy, you can find all the same medications that are available at your vet's office, but you can shop for them from the comfort of home. (chewy.com)
  • Families whose children are severely reactive to synthetic colors must either pay up to ten times as much to have their antibiotic prescriptions filled without dyes at a compounding pharmacy, or opt for traditional medications out of desperation - and watch their child suffer with horrific and painful side effects for up to two weeks . (change.org)
  • meds
  • the problem was when he was 2.5 i took him off and he kept getting sick and was back on anti-biotics,then back on allergy meds,it helped but he had no amune system,i took him off all meds,including anti-biotics and he has since built up ammunity to a lot of his allergies. (healingwell.com)
  • side effects
  • Singulair has almost no side effects and is great for allergies. (healingwell.com)
  • When your health care team records your health history, allergies and side effects will be carefully noted. (healthcentral.com)
  • Taking two medications with different names but similar effects increases your chance of developing serious side effects. (livestrong.com)
  • All medication can cause side effects, but some can also cause allergies. (vic.gov.au)
  • The CMI includes detailed information about the medication in plain English, including use, side effects and precautions. (vic.gov.au)
  • They can advise you about side effects and possible interactions with other medication you are taking. (vic.gov.au)
  • Side effects of high doses of aspirin that are not caused by allergies include bruising and stomach upset, but even higher doses can cause confusion and ringing in the ears. (vic.gov.au)
  • allergen
  • In this case, the medication is the allergen that the body has been sensitized to by previous exposure. (healthcentral.com)
  • Allergies occur when the body has a harmful immune response from a protein that has been inhaled, eaten, drank or exposed to the body in a way that causes it to be sensitized and unable to tolerate the protein or otherwise called in this instance an allergen. (weebly.com)
  • These types of medication can save your life if you've been accidentally exposed to an allergen or if you're having a bad asthma attack. (verywellhealth.com)
  • occur
  • If an emergency should occur, it may be necessary to save your life by giving you a medication to which you've had a side effect. (healthcentral.com)
  • Allergies occur when your immune system is triggered by envirionmental factors it should ignore--for example, pollen in the air, or dander on a cat or dog--and creates cells to fight against them. (healthtap.com)
  • Allergies can occur to medication prescribed by your doctor or medication bought from supermarkets and pharmacies. (vic.gov.au)
  • pollen
  • The scenery is gorgeous, the weather ideal and my allergies are terrible due to the rag weed pollen, goldenrod and the mites on the oak tree leaves. (seekyt.com)
  • These medications work against histamines, chemicals released by the immune system in reaction to substances such as pollen or dust, which attach to cells and irritate them. (verywellhealth.com)