• Laboratory workers are at risk when handling specimens containing Brucella species because of aerosol-generating procedures or accidents that may result in infection of blood or conjunctiva ( 6 ). (cdc.gov)
  • Blood culture isolates were initially misidentified because of variable Gram stain results, which led to misdiagnoses and subsequent laboratory exposures. (cdc.gov)
  • In addition, no study has assessed exposures that might result in the development of myositis in military personnel. (clinicaltrials.gov)
  • Military personnel experience a number of intense, unique exposures, often over a relatively short interval, which include different stresses, novel vaccines, distinct occupational exposures, battlefield injuries and unique chemicals during field deployment, that differ from those exposures in non-military populations. (clinicaltrials.gov)
  • Approximately 5 weeks after symptom onset, colleagues from the hospital microbiology laboratory where she was employed (laboratory 1) drew her blood for culture again. (cdc.gov)
  • We report two laboratory-acquired Brucella melitensis infections that were shown to be epidemiologically related. (cdc.gov)
  • from blood cultures, laboratory workers rely on the Gram stain as a preliminary test. (cdc.gov)
  • Of the eight reported cases, two were laboratory-acquired, five resulted from ingesting unpasteurized milk products from countries with endemic disease, and one had an undetermined source of infection (New York State Department of Health [NYSDOH], unpub. (cdc.gov)
  • In the first approach, we will assess risk factors in a case-control study of 300 patients who developed myositis while on active duty by comparing them to 1500 active duty military personnel (randomly selected, but matched 5:1 by gender, race, and age and military service within 10 years) who have not been diagnosed with an autoimmune disease or chronic muscle disease. (clinicaltrials.gov)
  • Establish or monitor quality assurance programs or activities to ensure the accuracy of laboratory results. (onetonline.org)
  • Preliminary data suggest a trend for an increasing incidence in myositis in military personnel over the last decade for unknown reasons. (clinicaltrials.gov)
  • Analyze laboratory findings to check the accuracy of the results. (onetonline.org)
  • Initial isolates from blood cultures of an index patient and two laboratory workers were incorrectly identified as contaminants, in part because of reporting of primary Gram stain results as gram-positive and gram-variable. (cdc.gov)
  • However, other military personnel do not. (clinicaltrials.gov)
  • To study environmental risk factors for myositis in military personnel. (clinicaltrials.gov)
  • Military personnel who developed myositis during their period of service. (clinicaltrials.gov)
  • Healthy military personnel who do not have myositis or another autoimmune disease. (clinicaltrials.gov)
  • Therefore, we propose a protocol that consists of three complementary approaches to attempt to determine the environmental factors associated with the development of myositis in active duty military personnel and an initial understanding of the possible mechanisms involved. (clinicaltrials.gov)
  • In the second case-control approach, we will attempt to define environmental factors associated with the development of myositis that developed in military personnel (n=150) by comparing them to 150 similarly matched military personnel who have not been diagnosed with an autoimmune disease or chronic muscle disease. (clinicaltrials.gov)
  • In early November 2001, a 57-year-old female laboratory worker (laboratory worker 1) began experiencing nonspecific symptoms of malaise, vomiting, headache, lower leg cramping, anorexia, and fever. (cdc.gov)
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