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  • perceive
  • Physiologic futility - when a procedure cannot bring about its physiologic objective (e.g. when CPR cannot achieve a BP target) - involves a "value choice" of the measurement of organ function rather than the value of the outcome for the patient as the patient might perceive it. (litfl.com)
  • practice
  • After analyzing two concrete cases from the perspective of the casuistry approach, they conclude that the increasing use of alternative therapies "provides an opportunity to reexamine the ethical foundations of western medical practice. (hospicecare.com)
  • intensive
  • A 77-year-old man whose medical history includes treated hypertension and hypercholesterolemia, previous heavy alcohol intake, and mild cognitive impairment required 15 days of treatment in the intensive care unit (ICU) of a university hospital for septic shock due to fecal peritonitis from a perforated sigmoid colon. (bioethics.net)
  • decision
  • The expression disproportionate futility qualifies a value-laden decision to abstain from a certain medical intervention - in spite of an eventual statistical probability of achieving an immediate beneficial therapeutic effect - because its application would represent an excessive burden and will actually not substantially modify the patient's prognosis. (hospicecare.com)
  • The writer concludes that this type of medical decision must involve certain ethical principles including non-malfeasance, beneficence, autonomy, and respect for all people. (echeat.com)
  • Medical decision making is a difficult area. (blogspot.com)
  • ethical
  • Ethical Considerations of Complementary and Alternative Medical Therapies in Conventional Medical Settings, Ann Intern Med 2002, 137, 8: 660- 664). (hospicecare.com)
  • This relevant distinction underlies the ethical principle of therapeutic proportionality, which states the moral obligation to implement only those medical interventions that fulfill a relation of due proportion between the means to be employed and the pursued end. (hospicecare.com)
  • The discussion includes a number of journals cited, as well as ethical papers, and the opinions of several medical professors. (nursingassistantguides.com)
  • benefits
  • And medical experience shows that the subjective perception of the benefits of a given therapy is not a necessary condition for defining its objective utility. (hospicecare.com)
  • rather
  • Thus, with Christensen I would rather introduce a distinction between absolute, statistical and disproportionate futility. (hospicecare.com)
  • death
  • The common sense notion that a time does come for all of us when death or disability exceeds our medical powers cannot be denied. (springer.com)
  • Premature death has meaning in a medical sense, but what is its meaning in a religious sense? (medicalethicsandme.org)
  • patient
  • Exploring these issues has forced us to revisit the doctor-patient relationship and the relationship of the medical profession to society in a most fundamental way. (springer.com)
  • I maintain that medical futility is the unacceptable likelihood of achieving an effect that the patient has the capacity to appreciate as a benefit . (springer.com)
  • den Hollander D. Medical futility and the burns patient. (litfl.com)
  • University
  • Dr Karen M Hancock - Project Coordinator and Research Associate, Medical Psychology Research Unit, University of Sydney, Sydney, NSW. (mja.com.au)
  • Resources
  • FOAMed Medical Education Resources by LITFL is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 4.0 International License . (litfl.com)